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AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 9, 2013
Two businesses in Bel Air recently teamed up to get a special edition Old Glory flying again. Bishop & Adkins P.A., a CPA firm at 612 Rock Spring Road, says it recently acquired a replica of the original garrison flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore on Sept. 12, 1814. The replica had flown over Fort McHenry and was in need of repair, the firm noted in a news release. The flag was taken to Kroh's Cleaners on Pennsylvania Avenue, which repaired and cleaned it. Bishop & Adkins was able to display the repaired flag for the July 4th celebrations in Bel Air and elsewhere in Harford County.
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NEWS
September 21, 2014
I read with interest Roy Valiant's letter ( "Stop desecrating the anthem," Sept 18). As someone who routinely shouts, "O!" when the song is performed at Orioles games, I'd like to offer a different perspective. I won't dwell on how ironic it is that a song associated with independence has become the focus of so many "authorities" laying down the law about how it must be sung. Instead, I'd like to point out that Francis Scott Key did not write a hymn or a dirge or a prayer. He wrote and published a poem - a poem that became so popular that someone eventually set it to music.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
As Defenders' Day approaches here in Baltimore, we will be commemorating the two-hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore and Francis Scott Key's composition of "The Defence of Fort McHenry. "  I expect that the ink was scarcely dry on the poem when people were singing it, to the tune of "To Anacreon in Heaven," a British  drinking song. It caught on, of course, though "The Star-Spangled Banner" did not become the official national anthem until 1931. In 1879, Dudley Buck, an American  organist and composer, used the tune in a composition for organ later orchestrated as the "Festival Overture on the American National Air," also known as the "Festival Overture on the 'Star-Spangled Banner.'" Surely someone in Baltimore will find a way to program this work during the bicentennial season.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 11, 2014
As Defenders' Day approaches here in Baltimore, we will be commemorating the two-hundredth anniversary of the Battle of Baltimore and Francis Scott Key's composition of "The Defence of Fort McHenry. "  I expect that the ink was scarcely dry on the poem when people were singing it, to the tune of "To Anacreon in Heaven," a British  drinking song. It caught on, of course, though "The Star-Spangled Banner" did not become the official national anthem until 1931. In 1879, Dudley Buck, an American  organist and composer, used the tune in a composition for organ later orchestrated as the "Festival Overture on the American National Air," also known as the "Festival Overture on the 'Star-Spangled Banner.'" Surely someone in Baltimore will find a way to program this work during the bicentennial season.
NEWS
September 21, 2014
I read with interest Roy Valiant's letter ( "Stop desecrating the anthem," Sept 18). As someone who routinely shouts, "O!" when the song is performed at Orioles games, I'd like to offer a different perspective. I won't dwell on how ironic it is that a song associated with independence has become the focus of so many "authorities" laying down the law about how it must be sung. Instead, I'd like to point out that Francis Scott Key did not write a hymn or a dirge or a prayer. He wrote and published a poem - a poem that became so popular that someone eventually set it to music.
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | July 4, 1997
AS BANDS AND orchestras across the country tune up for Independence Day concerts, they are certain to perpetuate our nation's curious case of muddled musical personality on patriotic occasions.A typical Fourth of July crowd-pleaser is ''The 1812 Overture,'' which might be considered an odd choice. It celebrates a military defeat of the French, our allies during the Revolution, by the Russians, who were not exactly our friends, and the British, who were our enemies -- both during the Revolution and in 1812.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
A key document in the transition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" from popular song to national anthem is coming home to Fort McHenry. A draft of the song's arrangement, drawn up in the early 20th century by a committee that included composer and bandleader John Philip Sousa, has been donated to the national monument and historic shrine by the woman whose father obtained it from his music teacher. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was adopted as the national anthem by an act of Congress in 1931.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
It's a mere yellowing piece of paper with a few hundred words scrawled on it, a document that once sat forgotten in a drawer for three-quarters of a century. But this summer, the original manuscript of "The Star-Spangled Banner," the poem Francis Scott Key wrote about a certain inspiring morning in September 1814, will be the centerpiece of a sprawling, multimillion-dollar statewide celebration. On Friday morning, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced the schedule of events for Star-Spangled Summer 2014, a three-month tribute that will conclude Maryland's commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore sun | February 17, 2012
An article in The Baltimore Sun  by Chris Kaltenbach recounts how documents from 1917 on the musical arrangement of "The Star-Spangled Banner" came to be donated to Fort McHenry.   The tune to which Francis Scott Key's poem (originally titled "Defence of Fort McHenry") is that of "To Anacreon in Heaven. " Anacreon, the Greek lyric poet, was the patron of The Anacreontic Club of eighteenth-century London, which celebrated food and drink. The melody is attributed to the British musicologist and composer John Stafford Smith.  But it is probably not the text of   "To Anacreon in Heaven"*  that buzzed in Key's head as he wrote his verses, but a different set of words, "Adams and Liberty,"  a patriotic text by Robert Treat Paine also set to Smith's tune:  YE sons of Columbia, who bravely have fought,          For those rights, which unstained from your Sires had descended,      May you long taste the blessings your valour has brought,          And your sons reap the soil which their fathers defended.                          'Mid the reign of mild Peace,                          May your nation increase,      With the glory of Rome, and the wisdom of Greece;          And ne'er shall the sons of Columbia be slaves,          While the earth bears a plant, or the sea rolls its waves.
NEWS
December 1, 2010
I read with great interest the article "Rare copy of the 'Star Spangled Banner' goes on the auction block" (Nov. 30), but I feel that the publisher of the item to be auctioned, Thomas Carr, continues to not get the recognition he deserves. Carr not only ran a music store but was also the organist at Old St. Paul's Episcopal Church. While Chris Coover, a senior book and manuscript specialist at Christie's auction house says that "[Carr] may not have known that Francis Scott Key was the author," Key most certainly did know him since Key was a strong Episcopalian and a good friend of the Old St. Paul's rector at that time, Bishop Kemp.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 10, 2014
It's a mere yellowing piece of paper with a few hundred words scrawled on it, a document that once sat forgotten in a drawer for three-quarters of a century. But this summer, the original manuscript of "The Star-Spangled Banner," the poem Francis Scott Key wrote about a certain inspiring morning in September 1814, will be the centerpiece of a sprawling, multimillion-dollar statewide celebration. On Friday morning, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake announced the schedule of events for Star-Spangled Summer 2014, a three-month tribute that will conclude Maryland's commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the War of 1812.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | July 9, 2013
Two businesses in Bel Air recently teamed up to get a special edition Old Glory flying again. Bishop & Adkins P.A., a CPA firm at 612 Rock Spring Road, says it recently acquired a replica of the original garrison flag that flew over Fort McHenry during the Battle of Baltimore on Sept. 12, 1814. The replica had flown over Fort McHenry and was in need of repair, the firm noted in a news release. The flag was taken to Kroh's Cleaners on Pennsylvania Avenue, which repaired and cleaned it. Bishop & Adkins was able to display the repaired flag for the July 4th celebrations in Bel Air and elsewhere in Harford County.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
A key document in the transition of "The Star-Spangled Banner" from popular song to national anthem is coming home to Fort McHenry. A draft of the song's arrangement, drawn up in the early 20th century by a committee that included composer and bandleader John Philip Sousa, has been donated to the national monument and historic shrine by the woman whose father obtained it from his music teacher. "The Star-Spangled Banner" was adopted as the national anthem by an act of Congress in 1931.
NEWS
By NEIL A. GRAUER | July 4, 1997
AS BANDS AND orchestras across the country tune up for Independence Day concerts, they are certain to perpetuate our nation's curious case of muddled musical personality on patriotic occasions.A typical Fourth of July crowd-pleaser is ''The 1812 Overture,'' which might be considered an odd choice. It celebrates a military defeat of the French, our allies during the Revolution, by the Russians, who were not exactly our friends, and the British, who were our enemies -- both during the Revolution and in 1812.
NEWS
By The Rev. Timothy E. Schenck | July 4, 2002
IT'S BEEN a rough couple of weeks for God. Declared unconstitutional by a court in San Francisco on June 26, God now faces the prospect of a most unusual July 4. Many of our most beloved patriotic customs hang in the balance. Singing "God Bless America"? That's obviously out. Buying a small flag for the local Independence Day parade? That would involve using currency bearing the phrase "In God We Trust." Even "The Star-Spangled Banner" is suspect since the little-known fourth verse contains not just the word "God" but also refers to the nation's being "blest with victory and peace."
SPORTS
By Marty McGee and Marty McGee,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 9, 1991
LAUREL -- Anacreontic drove to victory in the Heavenly Cause Stakes at Laurel Race Course, catching two speedier fillies in the final yards.The filly waited off a quick early pace set by Luramore, and after Suspect Terrain overhauled her in the final sixteenth-mile, Anacreontic was there to pass them both."
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