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By Darryl Fears, The Washington Post | May 2, 2011
A new report on the health of the Anacostia River by the DC Appleseed advocacy group has a finding that will surprise no one: It is filthy. But the report, scheduled for release Monday, has a surprisingly bold suggestion to federal officials for cleaning it up: You bear most of the responsibility for polluting the river, and you should do more to help restore it. City officials, including Mayor Vincent Gray and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.),...
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NEWS
By Darryl Fears, The Washington Post | May 2, 2011
A new report on the health of the Anacostia River by the DC Appleseed advocacy group has a finding that will surprise no one: It is filthy. But the report, scheduled for release Monday, has a surprisingly bold suggestion to federal officials for cleaning it up: You bear most of the responsibility for polluting the river, and you should do more to help restore it. City officials, including Mayor Vincent Gray and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.),...
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NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 26, 2005
The body of a University of Maryland senior who had been missing for more than a week was discovered floating in the Anacostia River yesterday, Washington police said. Arvin Sharma, a 22-year-old Greenbelt resident, was discovered near the 11th Street Bridge about 9:45 a.m., according to police. He was last seen in the early morning of April 16 at Club Lime in the 1800 block of Half St. in Southwest Washington, police said. Sharma drove to the club with several friends that night. They told police that when the group was ready to leave, they could not find Sharma and he did not return cell phone messages.
NEWS
By Mark Greenbaum and David O'Leary | September 13, 2010
One of the few positives that accompanies the end of summer is the arrival of pennant fever which allows a lucky handful of cities to harbor sandlot dreams of October glory. Sadly, for yet another season, the playoffs will elude both of our local teams. The Orioles have, at least, perked up under their new manager, but the Nationals? Their rusty collection of mediocre arms, tired bats, and underwhelming prospects is locked into another last-place finish. The sting of this year's disappointment was worsened by the announcement that Stephen Strasburg, the Nationals' top young phenom who struck out 14 batters in his first big league start, was felled by a potentially career-ending arm injury.
SPORTS
March 29, 2008
EXHIBITION BASEBALL Orioles@Nationals 6 P.M. [MASN] This game isn't about the baseball, it's about the chance to see the Washington Nationals' new stadium. The cozy ballpark, which will seat 41,888, is located along the banks of the Anacostia River. Still, for $611 million, it's no Camden Yards.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | April 22, 2010
On the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, what environmental legislation should we celebrate most? What bill has really stood tall for our fragile planet? The Endangered Species Act of 1973? The Clean Air Act of 1990? Or … the District of Columbia's plastic bag tax of 2010? Actually, despite my gratitude for healthy lungs and spotted owls, I would vote for D.C.'s brand new 5-cent tax on plastic bags. The concepts behind this local municipal bill, believe it or not, are the best tools we now have for saving our global environment, including solving the crisis of climate change.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Jeff Barker and Ed Waldman and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - In a political maneuver that delays for two weeks a vote on a stadium plan, the chairwoman of the D.C. Council moved to sharply reduce the public money that would be needed to build a ballpark for the relocated Montreal Expos. Saying she had yet another plan that would save Washington $350 million, D.C. Council chairwoman Linda W. Cropp yesterday outlined a proposal under which the city would finance about a third of the stadium's cost and leave the rest to a developer who would get a potentially lucrative federal tax credit.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie | November 7, 1991
Government officials signed a pact to clean up the Anacostia River yesterday, tackling an urban river so filthy that even the hearty blue crab can't live there and so devoid of trees that its water reaches a stifling 95 degrees in places.Flowing through Prince George's and Montgomery counties and into the heart of the District of Columbia, the Anacostia has been branded the "forgotten river."When the federal government vowed 30 years ago to clean up the Potomac and seven years ago to clean up the Chesapeake Bay, it ignored their tributary, the Anacostia, which is now so polluted that it will take a major local, state and federal effort to clean it up."
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,Staff Writer | April 21, 1993
Two polluted tributaries of the Chesapeake Bay, one urban and the other rural, rank among the most threatened rivers in North America, a national conservation group said yesterday.Runoff from Washington-area streets fouls the Anacostia River, and pollution from Pennsylvania farms has put the Susquehanna at risk, said American Rivers, a Washington-based organization.The Anacostia, which flows from Maryland through Washington, and the Susquehanna, the bay's largest freshwater artery, made the group's list of 25 waterways considered "in serious decline."
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 9, 2004
WASHINGTON - Mayor Anthony A. Williams' plan to finance a baseball stadium headed for a tantalizingly close vote in D.C. Council today, as the mayor warned opponents that baseball won't deliver a team if the city scraps or tinkers with the original stadium proposal. Williams said yesterday that he had secured the required seven votes for passage, but council opponents, who have complained about the stadium's cost, characterized his majority on the 13-member body as shaky. Williams said in the afternoon that, "We're trying to tighten them up and reinforce them [the votes]
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 24, 2010
Chesapeake born and bound to thee 'deed I am, I'm Chesapeake free Chesapeake born, Chesapeake Bay bred And when I'm gone, Chesapeake dead! "Chesapeake Born," Tom Wisner With the death this month of Tom Wisner, the colorful Chesapeake Bay folk singer, poet and storyteller whose work captured the spirit and beauty of the bay from Havre de Grace to Point Lookout, the nation's largest estuary lost one of its foremost advocates. At a recent gathering recalling Wisner's life at King's Landing Park in Calvert County, whose education center was named for him, eulogist Gov. Martin O'Malley spoke of his friendship with "The Bay Bard."
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | April 22, 2010
On the 40th anniversary of Earth Day, what environmental legislation should we celebrate most? What bill has really stood tall for our fragile planet? The Endangered Species Act of 1973? The Clean Air Act of 1990? Or … the District of Columbia's plastic bag tax of 2010? Actually, despite my gratitude for healthy lungs and spotted owls, I would vote for D.C.'s brand new 5-cent tax on plastic bags. The concepts behind this local municipal bill, believe it or not, are the best tools we now have for saving our global environment, including solving the crisis of climate change.
NEWS
March 22, 2010
A proposal in the Baltimore City Council to help clean up the environment by limiting the use of plastic bags in shops and stores is a perfect example of a law so compromised by the demands of competing special interests that it ends up accomplishing nothing. The plan endorsed Tuesday by a City Council panel started out honestly enough. Three years ago, the council began considering proposals to deal with the mounting problem of plastic and paper bag waste accumulating on city streets.
NEWS
March 22, 2010
A proposal in the Baltimore City Council to help clean up the environment by limiting the use of plastic bags in shops and stores is a perfect example of a law so compromised by the demands of competing special interests that it ends up accomplishing nothing. The plan endorsed Tuesday by a City Council panel started out honestly enough. Three years ago, the council began considering proposals to deal with the mounting problem of plastic and paper bag waste accumulating on city streets.
NEWS
February 22, 2010
The Baltimore City Council is again considering action to curb the mountain of plastic and paper bag waste accumulating on city streets. Most of this garbage ends up tangled in trees or clogging drainage grates, from whence it flows through the sewer system to pollute local rivers and streams. It's an eyesore and an environmental hazard the city just doesn't need. But it's a mystery why the council, which has been grappling with this issue since 2007, hasn't simply followed the lead of the successful effort to reduce plastic bag use in Washington.
SPORTS
March 29, 2008
EXHIBITION BASEBALL Orioles@Nationals 6 P.M. [MASN] This game isn't about the baseball, it's about the chance to see the Washington Nationals' new stadium. The cozy ballpark, which will seat 41,888, is located along the banks of the Anacostia River. Still, for $611 million, it's no Camden Yards.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 8, 1998
WASHINGTON - The urban Muse was on the move recently: 15 "slam poets" - competitive-minded junior high school versifiers - journeyed here from east of the Anacostia River, the threadbare cusp of the city, to have it out in a mainline bookstore five blocks from the White House.As this city's cultural events go, east of the Anacostia River is nowhere, the city's poverty core, the place for the rarest presidential photo op. The area's shortchanged opportunities are occasionally debated west of the river, but toward no great change of fate.
NEWS
March 22, 2010
A proposal in the Baltimore City Council to help clean up the environment by limiting the use of plastic bags in shops and stores is a perfect example of a law so compromised by the demands of competing special interests that it ends up accomplishing nothing. The plan endorsed Tuesday by a City Council panel started out honestly enough. Three years ago, the council began considering proposals to deal with the mounting problem of plastic and paper bag waste accumulating on city streets.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 26, 2005
The body of a University of Maryland senior who had been missing for more than a week was discovered floating in the Anacostia River yesterday, Washington police said. Arvin Sharma, a 22-year-old Greenbelt resident, was discovered near the 11th Street Bridge about 9:45 a.m., according to police. He was last seen in the early morning of April 16 at Club Lime in the 1800 block of Half St. in Southwest Washington, police said. Sharma drove to the club with several friends that night. They told police that when the group was ready to leave, they could not find Sharma and he did not return cell phone messages.
SPORTS
By Ed Waldman and Jeff Barker and Ed Waldman and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2004
WASHINGTON - In a political maneuver that delays for two weeks a vote on a stadium plan, the chairwoman of the D.C. Council moved to sharply reduce the public money that would be needed to build a ballpark for the relocated Montreal Expos. Saying she had yet another plan that would save Washington $350 million, D.C. Council chairwoman Linda W. Cropp yesterday outlined a proposal under which the city would finance about a third of the stadium's cost and leave the rest to a developer who would get a potentially lucrative federal tax credit.
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