Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAnacostia
IN THE NEWS

Anacostia

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 25, 2000
Two days' worth of sewage spills in the median strip of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway dumped about 12,600 gallons of sewage into a creek flowing into the Anacostia River, said a spokesman for the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission. The Prince George's County Health Department discovered the first spill Monday after a motorist reported a smell along the parkway near Route 450 in Bladensburg, said utility spokesman Chuck Brown. Utility workers fixed the spill, which was blamed on a grease clog in a pipe, but the next day another spill occurred in the same place, Brown said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Darryl Fears, The Washington Post | May 2, 2011
A new report on the health of the Anacostia River by the DC Appleseed advocacy group has a finding that will surprise no one: It is filthy. But the report, scheduled for release Monday, has a surprisingly bold suggestion to federal officials for cleaning it up: You bear most of the responsibility for polluting the river, and you should do more to help restore it. City officials, including Mayor Vincent Gray and Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-D.C.),...
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 24, 1997
LANDOVER -- The third-ranked St. Frances Panthers continued an impressive stretch of basketball, defeating Anacostia, 60-46, in the opening game of the inaugural DeMatha Invitational at the USAir Arena yesterday.Mark Karcher scored a game-high 30 points for the Panthers on 12-for-16 shooting and junior center Shawn Hampton added 10 points and 11 rebounds.After falling behind early, St. Frances (19-4) controlled the rest of the game, leading by as many as 18 points in the second half. Since losing the area's No. 1 ranking, St. Frances has reeled off four straight double-digit victories.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2007
The NAACP's long-planned move to Washington is on hold - at least for now. Last year, leaders of the nation's oldest civil rights organization announced, with great fanfare, their intention to relocate NAACP headquarters from Northwest Baltimore to the nation's capital. In December, the District of Columbia City Council voted to provide $3.5 million in grants to help the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People move to Anacostia Gateway, a 63,000-square-foot office complex rising along the eastern banks of the Anacostia River.
SPORTS
By Derek Toney and Derek Toney,Contributing Writer | December 18, 1992
WASHINGTON -- It was a day that All-American Keith Booth scored only 16 points and was in foul trouble the entire second half.It was a day that second-leading scorer Norman Nolan fouled out midway in the final period after scoring only nine.But on a day that those things should have spelled big problems for Dunbar, Yashida King stepped up in an enormous way.King had his best game as a varsity player, scoring 26 points as the No. 1 Poets defeated Anacostia, Washington's top-ranked team, 78-70, in the opening game of the Gonzaga Classic at Gonzaga High.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1998
COLLEGE PARK -- It was not a normal recruiting season for Maryland.Two weeks ago, recruiting coordinator Chris Cosh left to take the defensive coordinator's job at Michigan State. That didn't appear to have an adverse effect, as five of the 19 players who signed letters of intent with Maryland yesterday played in Prince George's County, one of the areas Cosh worked.Two players from Anacostia High in Washington, D.C., reneged on oral commitments to Maryland coach Ron Vanderlinden and instead shifted their allegiance, and the coach is waiting on others to meet assorted academic standards.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen | November 22, 1997
Ron Vanderlinden's second recruiting effort has already netted commitments from seven players, with the early emphasis being on receivers and secondary players, two areas where Maryland needs immediate help.The Terps expect to get three players from Anacostia High in Washington: wide receiver Jay Chapman, defensive back Tyrone Stewart and linebacker Bobby Addison. Stewart's father, Willie, is the coach at Anacostia, the same program that this year sent the Terps two-way prospect Eric James.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2007
The NAACP's long-planned move to Washington is on hold - at least for now. Last year, leaders of the nation's oldest civil rights organization announced, with great fanfare, their intention to relocate NAACP headquarters from Northwest Baltimore to the nation's capital. In December, the District of Columbia City Council voted to provide $3.5 million in grants to help the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People move to Anacostia Gateway, a 63,000-square-foot office complex rising along the eastern banks of the Anacostia River.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | April 7, 1998
WHEN Congress was run by Democrats and the White House by a Republican, congressional Democrats frequently called for the restoration of U.S. cities before money was spent on other programs.When Republicans became a congressional majority and tried to create tax incentives for individuals and businesses in order to rebuild decaying neighborhoods, they were blocked by liberal Democrats, who feared that success in this area would end the cult of dependency that is their political bread and butter.
NEWS
By John B. O'Donnell and John B. O'Donnell,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 21, 1994
BLADENSBURG -- Against the backdrop of an abandoned Maryland marina silted over as the result of urban development, the chief federal environmental official said yesterday that 40 percent of the nation's rivers, lakes and streams are adversely affected by pollution.Carol M. Browner, head of the Environmental Protection Agency, cited the Anacostia River waterfront, just outside Washington in this historic Prince George's County community, as an example of what "silt from polluted runoff -- the No. 1 problem threatening America's waterways" -- can produce.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
The board of the NAACP is expected to vote this weekend on a proposal to relocate the civil rights organization's headquarters from Northwest Baltimore to the nation's capital. Those close to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People say the 64-member board is expected to approve the proposal to move to a new office and retail complex rising on the east bank of the Anacostia River. While the much-anticipated decision would solidify the organization's intent to relocate, it would be far from the final step in a plan that has been decades in the making.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,SUN REPORTER | December 19, 2006
After two decades in Baltimore, the NAACP is set to relocate to the nation's capital. Bruce S. Gordon, president and chief executive of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, said last night that the organization is in final negotiations with Washington officials and a developer to move its headquarters from Northwest Baltimore to an office and retail site under construction in Southeast Washington's historic Anacostia district.
BUSINESS
By LORRAINE MIRABELLA and LORRAINE MIRABELLA,SUN REPORTER | December 13, 2005
Baltimore developer The Cordish Co. will play a key role in transforming a gritty riverbank in southeast Washington into a hub of shops, restaurants, condos, offices and hotels surrounding the new Washington Nationals ballpark to be built by 2008, the Anacostia Waterfront Corp. announced yesterday. A group led by Cordish, in partnership with Monument Realty LLC, was one of two development teams Washington officials chose for the estimated $2 billion project to redevelop nearly 15 acres of publicly and privately controlled land north and east of the 21-acre ballpark site on the Anacostia River, about a mile south of the Capitol.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 26, 2005
The body of a University of Maryland senior who had been missing for more than a week was discovered floating in the Anacostia River yesterday, Washington police said. Arvin Sharma, a 22-year-old Greenbelt resident, was discovered near the 11th Street Bridge about 9:45 a.m., according to police. He was last seen in the early morning of April 16 at Club Lime in the 1800 block of Half St. in Southwest Washington, police said. Sharma drove to the club with several friends that night. They told police that when the group was ready to leave, they could not find Sharma and he did not return cell phone messages.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 29, 2004
WASHINGTON - When it opened in 1992, Oriole Park at Camden Yards was hailed as an old-fashioned ballpark with modern amenities that nestled cozily into its urban environs. Now, it appears a new stadium will be built in the region, and D.C. officials believe their proposed park will accentuate the qualities that fans like best about Camden Yards. They say it would be even more intimate. The new, unnamed stadium would be built on the Anacostia River waterfront and would house the Montreal Expos, who are being lured to Washington subject to the approval of Major League Baseball.
SPORTS
By David Steele | September 23, 2004
HERE'S WHAT you need to know about where Washington has decided to put its proposed ballpark, and why Peter Angelos can't possibly be happy about it: If they build it, they will come. If D.C. builds it along the Anacostia waterfront in a Southeast Washington area starving for development, baseball will come to it. There will be a Washington Expos, or Senators, or Grays, or Not-Orioles, or some tenant under some name. They'll be there. Bud Selig and Co. will be so on board with this plan, they might as well walk into today's owners meeting with Metro farecards in hand.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | February 16, 2007
The board of the NAACP is expected to vote this weekend on a proposal to relocate the civil rights organization's headquarters from Northwest Baltimore to the nation's capital. Those close to the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People say the 64-member board is expected to approve the proposal to move to a new office and retail complex rising on the east bank of the Anacostia River. While the much-anticipated decision would solidify the organization's intent to relocate, it would be far from the final step in a plan that has been decades in the making.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 25, 2000
Two days' worth of sewage spills in the median strip of the Baltimore-Washington Parkway dumped about 12,600 gallons of sewage into a creek flowing into the Anacostia River, said a spokesman for the Washington Suburban Sanitary Commission. The Prince George's County Health Department discovered the first spill Monday after a motorist reported a smell along the parkway near Route 450 in Bladensburg, said utility spokesman Chuck Brown. Utility workers fixed the spill, which was blamed on a grease clog in a pipe, but the next day another spill occurred in the same place, Brown said.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | September 14, 1999
I got down to the Anacostia Museum of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington too late to review the retrospective exhibition of Alma Thomas, an African-American artist who, before her death in 1978, became one of the most important figures in the Washington Color Field School.However, a companion exhibition at the Anacostia Museum, "Locating the Spirit: Religion and Spirituality in African-American Art," continues through Dec. 1 and is well worth the trip to D.C.The show focuses on the many ways African-American artists have expressed and interpreted the role of religion and spirituality in the black community.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.