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By Frank Dell'Apa and Frank Dell'Apa,Boston Globe | May 15, 1992
Soon after Lyle Alzado developed the brain lymphoma that would eventually cause his death, he announced that the cancer had been caused by anabolic steroids and human growth hormone.Alzado, who died yesterday at age 43, said he hoped that by making his case public, he would help others learn from his mistakes."He used steroids to get bigger and to win," said Dr. Lyle Micheli, an orthopedic surgeon at Massachusetts General Hospital. "He was involved in a sport that requires size and strength."
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By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,bill.ordine@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
That Big Brown became the Barry Bonds of horse racing - both have had their extraordinary athletic accomplishments associated with steroids - might be an unfortunate blemish on the winner of this year's Kentucky Derby and Preakness. However, if the publicity surrounding Big Brown trainer Rick Dutrow's admission that he occasionally used steroids on the colt hastened the end of steroid use in some racing jurisdictions, that's just fine with many in Maryland's racing community. In September, the Maryland Racing Commission approved restrictions on a handful of anabolic steroids in an action similar to new rules approved in Kentucky in August.
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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 7, 1998
BERLIN -- A former East German sports doctor admitted yesterday in a Berlin court that he handed out anabolic steroids for use by young female swimmers, the first formal confession of such practices by an official of the Communist state that once churned out gold-medal-winning athletes.In a brief statement, Dieter Binus said that the doses of the steroids never exceeded 1,000 milligrams a year, an amount that he contended was too small to harm the young swimmers. He denied giving testosterone injections or other drugs to the athletes.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | August 20, 2008
Facial puffiness. Higher blood pressure and heart rate. Drastic personality changes. Those are some of the signs Maryland physicians are being encouraged to look for as they treat young athletes - signs that could be red flags for steroid use, according to a campaign launched yesterday. "The message about anabolic steroids, about energy drinks, supplements, is something that people want to know about," said Michael Gimbel, director of Powered by Me!, a St. Joseph Medical Center program for training and educating people on steroids and other performance enhancers.
NEWS
By Watertown (Wis.) Daily Times | August 12, 1991
LYLE ALZADO used to be a rough, tough -- emphasis on tough, by his own admission and boast -- defensive end with the NFL Raiders. Today, having "used a certain steroid" in trying for a comeback with the Raiders last year, he has an inoperable brain tumor. That sounds a loud alarm bell.Alzado's belief that the steroid brought on the tumor has some medical backing. Dr. Forest Tennant, the NFL's former drug adviser, told the Associated Press: "Anabolic steroids depress the immune system and lymphocytes.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | March 13, 2005
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - The recipe called for 1/2 cc of testosterone cypionate every three days; 1 cc of testosterone enanthate per week; Equipoise and Winstrol V, 1/4 cc every three days, injected into the buttocks, one in one cheek, one in the other. It was the cocktail of a hardcore steroids user, and it is one of the "arrays" Mark McGwire used to become the biggest thing in baseball in the 1990s, sources have told the newspaper. Long before Jose Canseco claimed he injected McGwire in the buttocks in his tell-all autobiography Juiced, McGwire denied ever using illegal steroids.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | March 14, 2004
On the eve of its biggest annual event, professional wrestling was hit with a blow Friday when a national newspaper raised questions about the role of steroids and painkillers in the lives -- and deaths -- of wrestlers. USA Today reported in an investigation that at least 65 wrestlers among the 1,000 under age 45 who had performed professionally since 1997 had died, including 25 from heart attacks or other coronary problems. It termed that rate "extraordinarily high ... for people that young."
NEWS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Staff Writer | November 20, 1992
He could have been the "before" picture in a Charles Atlas bodybuilding ad."I was the little guy who always got laughed at, pushed around, when I was a kid," said the man, who was charged Wednesday as a principal in what U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration officials described as a nationwide black-market steroids business that was smashed by a DEA task force based in Baltimore.The suspect, who has agreed to cooperate with authorities, asked that his name not be published. In turn, he agreed to discuss his use of steroids and the damaging effect the performance-enhancing drugs have on competitors he has known on the amateur bodybuilding circuit.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry | July 7, 1991
Ask yourself this question: Are you a guy of the male gender If so, I advise you to report to prison immediately, because you are violating a federal law.I base this statement on a letter I got from alert reader Richard Watkins, M.D., who sent me a shocking medical document concerning the federal Anabolic Steroids Control Act. Steroids, as you know, are substances that some guys put in their bodies in an effort to develop bulging, rippling, sharply defined...
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - Steroids experts say federal prosecutors missed an opportunity to learn more about what slugger Barry Bonds did and didn't do - and perhaps strike a memorable blow against steroid use - by failing to proceed with a trial in the case of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, or BALCO. Now, the experts suggest, Bonds might as well wear a question mark on his back instead of No. 25. "The whole BALCO thing leaves us in a very unsatisfied situation," said Gary Wadler, a New York University medical professor and an expert on drugs in sports.
NEWS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,Sun Reporter | July 1, 2008
It usually takes three questions into his chats with youngsters about the dangers of using steroids for Don Hooton to find out how little they know. Hooton says that after he asks youths their ages and where they're from, he asks whether any adult - parent, teacher or coach - has talked seriously to them about the dangers of the substance that he believes caused his son, Taylor, to commit suicide five years ago at the age of 17. "Rarely do 10 percent of the hands go up," Hooton said yesterday during a Promoting a Lifetime of Activity for Youth (PLAY)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun reporter | December 19, 2007
Following a national trend, the Maryland Racing Commission said yesterday that it is "resolved" to implement a ban on anabolic steroids beginning with the Pimlico race meet April 17. Maryland will follow the recommendations set forth in a Dec. 17 meeting by the Association of Racing Commissioners International and the Racing Medication and Testing Consortium. The RMTC is pushing for the regulation of four commonly used steroids - boldenone (Equipose), stanozolol (Winstrol), nandrolone (Durabolin)
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,Sun reporter | September 20, 2005
WASHINGTON - Steroids experts say federal prosecutors missed an opportunity to learn more about what slugger Barry Bonds did and didn't do - and perhaps strike a memorable blow against steroid use - by failing to proceed with a trial in the case of the Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative, or BALCO. Now, the experts suggest, Bonds might as well wear a question mark on his back instead of No. 25. "The whole BALCO thing leaves us in a very unsatisfied situation," said Gary Wadler, a New York University medical professor and an expert on drugs in sports.
SPORTS
By NEW YORK DAILY NEWS | March 13, 2005
ANN ARBOR, Mich. - The recipe called for 1/2 cc of testosterone cypionate every three days; 1 cc of testosterone enanthate per week; Equipoise and Winstrol V, 1/4 cc every three days, injected into the buttocks, one in one cheek, one in the other. It was the cocktail of a hardcore steroids user, and it is one of the "arrays" Mark McGwire used to become the biggest thing in baseball in the 1990s, sources have told the newspaper. Long before Jose Canseco claimed he injected McGwire in the buttocks in his tell-all autobiography Juiced, McGwire denied ever using illegal steroids.
SPORTS
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | October 31, 2004
SAN FRANCISCO - The vice president of BALCO Laboratories told federal investigators last year that San Francisco Giants star Barry Bonds tried the company's new performance-enhancing drugs but didn't like how one of them made him feel - just one of many allegations included in revelatory documents disclosed by the government late Friday. According to the investigator's report, James Valente alleged that Bonds received "the clear" and "the cream" - code names for the steroid THG and a testosterone cream - from BALCO "on a couple of occasions."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sun Staff | March 14, 2004
On the eve of its biggest annual event, professional wrestling was hit with a blow Friday when a national newspaper raised questions about the role of steroids and painkillers in the lives -- and deaths -- of wrestlers. USA Today reported in an investigation that at least 65 wrestlers among the 1,000 under age 45 who had performed professionally since 1997 had died, including 25 from heart attacks or other coronary problems. It termed that rate "extraordinarily high ... for people that young."
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,bill.ordine@baltsun.com | October 3, 2008
That Big Brown became the Barry Bonds of horse racing - both have had their extraordinary athletic accomplishments associated with steroids - might be an unfortunate blemish on the winner of this year's Kentucky Derby and Preakness. However, if the publicity surrounding Big Brown trainer Rick Dutrow's admission that he occasionally used steroids on the colt hastened the end of steroid use in some racing jurisdictions, that's just fine with many in Maryland's racing community. In September, the Maryland Racing Commission approved restrictions on a handful of anabolic steroids in an action similar to new rules approved in Kentucky in August.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | August 20, 2008
Facial puffiness. Higher blood pressure and heart rate. Drastic personality changes. Those are some of the signs Maryland physicians are being encouraged to look for as they treat young athletes - signs that could be red flags for steroid use, according to a campaign launched yesterday. "The message about anabolic steroids, about energy drinks, supplements, is something that people want to know about," said Michael Gimbel, director of Powered by Me!, a St. Joseph Medical Center program for training and educating people on steroids and other performance enhancers.
SPORTS
By LAURA VECSEY | January 23, 2004
THE MINUTE President Bush stared glinty-eyed into the camera and went Clint Eastwood on the issue of steroids, you knew we were going to spend the next few news cycles rehashing the litany of steroid abuses/abusers going on in sports. Quick, what's WADA? What's HGH, THG, EPO, Balco? Who's Dick Pound, Victor Conte, Kelli White? To refresh my memory on this mind-numbing topic, I hit the Internet. Guess what? Reading online about steroids, I amazingly found links to steroid sellers on Internet sites of a least two of America's largest newspapers.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2004
When President Bush called on professional sports to do more to eradicate the abuse of performance-enhancing drugs, the message was not lost on the Orioles' organization. Orioles officials applauded the president's decision to highlight the illicit use of steroids and other supplements in his State of the Union address on Tuesday night. They hope that athletes heed the call to set a better example for America's children. But whatever good comes of the heightened national awareness of the dangers of steroids and other risky supplements, it will come about a year too late for the organization.
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