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By Anita Finkel and Anita Finkel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1995
"The Hundred Secret Senses," by Amy Tan. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 358 pages. $24.95 Shamelessly manipulative, cloyingly sentimental, blatantly false and phony - yes, it's a new, sure-to-be-best-selling Amy Tan novel streaking into town. The word "seductive" is sometimes applied to Ms. Tan's prose - a point readily granted, with the proviso that, in addition to a certain slick attractiveness, "seductive" connotes calculation and even a degree of contempt."The Hundred Secret Senses" tells the story of two half-sisters.
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NEWS
November 20, 2005
"The idea for this book began with a bolt of lightning and a clap of thunder." Saving Fish From Drowning by Amy Tan.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | November 9, 2003
The Opposite of Fate: A Book of Musings, by Amy Tan. Putnam. 398 pages. $24.95. At the beginning of this collection of meditations on her life and work, Amy Tan sets the record straight: The Joy Luck Club, her 1996 best seller about four Chinese immigrants and their daughters, is not a memoir. Nor is her most recent book, The Bonesetter's Daughter. Contrary to popular misconceptions, Tan writes, these stories are based only loosely on her life and are inspired instead by what she calls "emotional truths."
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2005
Saving Fish From Drowning Amy Tan G.P. Putnam / 496 pages Novelists lie; it's part of the job description. But in Amy Tan's Saving Fish From Drowning - her most ambitious work - the reader is ushered into a hall of mirrors where the writer begins by insisting that her story is largely true. She writes of a chance visit to the American Society for Psychical Research and her discovery of so-called "Automatic Writing," messages dictated by the dead through the living. She stumbles onto the memories of Bibi Chen, a woman with whom Tan says she had a nodding acquaintance in San Francisco.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | September 27, 1993
When Amy Tan considered whether her successful novel "The Joy Luck Club" should ever be adapted as a movie, she had more than the usual author's qualms about retaining the essence of her creation."
NEWS
By Joan Mooney and Joan Mooney,Ms. Mooney is a writer living in Washington | June 9, 1991
THE KITCHEN GOD'S WIFE.Amy Tan.Putnam.415 pages. $21.95. Amy Tan's much-awaited second novel has a good deal in common with "The Joy Luck Club" -- good news for her many fans. It is not a self-imitation, but readers will recognize her voice.Once again, Ms. Tan alternates between narration by a San Francisco-born daughter and her Chinese-born mother. Pearl, the daughter, conveys the familiar feeling of impatience when her mother, Winnie, clings to her old-fashioned ways or makes emotional demands that a Chinese mother considers it her daughter's duty to fulfill.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 30, 1991
Washington -- This time, her name is above the title on the book jacket. She's being feted at splashy publishing parties, and her promotional tour will take her not just across the country but over the Atlantic. The transformation of Amy Tan from surprise discovery of 1989 to established commodity of 1991 is complete.Which has netted her, to date, fame, fortune and two cracked teeth, the result of the nocturnal gnashings of an author who hit the top her first time out and now faced the dreaded sophomore jinx that has bedeviled other promising writers.
NEWS
November 20, 2005
"The idea for this book began with a bolt of lightning and a clap of thunder." Saving Fish From Drowning by Amy Tan.
NEWS
November 26, 1999
Bernard Klatzko,73, a researcher, author and record producer specializing in acoustic blues and early jazz, died Nov. 15 at North Shore Hospital in Glen Cove, N.Y., of complications from lymphoma.In the mid-1960s, Mr. Klatzko and the author Gayle Wardlow traveled to the Mississippi Delta looking for people who knew blues singers like Charley Patton, Son House and Skip James. His interviews and his 78-rpm recordings of early jazz and country blues became source material for archival reissues from the Origin Jazz Library and Yazoo records.
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN and LAURA LIPPMAN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2005
Saving Fish From Drowning Amy Tan G.P. Putnam / 496 pages Novelists lie; it's part of the job description. But in Amy Tan's Saving Fish From Drowning - her most ambitious work - the reader is ushered into a hall of mirrors where the writer begins by insisting that her story is largely true. She writes of a chance visit to the American Society for Psychical Research and her discovery of so-called "Automatic Writing," messages dictated by the dead through the living. She stumbles onto the memories of Bibi Chen, a woman with whom Tan says she had a nodding acquaintance in San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | November 9, 2003
The Opposite of Fate: A Book of Musings, by Amy Tan. Putnam. 398 pages. $24.95. At the beginning of this collection of meditations on her life and work, Amy Tan sets the record straight: The Joy Luck Club, her 1996 best seller about four Chinese immigrants and their daughters, is not a memoir. Nor is her most recent book, The Bonesetter's Daughter. Contrary to popular misconceptions, Tan writes, these stories are based only loosely on her life and are inspired instead by what she calls "emotional truths."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Schwarzbaum and By Lisa Schwarzbaum,Special to the Sun | February 25, 2001
"The Bonesetter's Daughter," by Amy Tan. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 353 pages. $25.95. Ingest enough of Amy Tan's stories and even a reader from the American heartland might feel Chinese. Because once you wander past the very Asian ghosts, superstitions, salutations and English-as-a-second-language locutions, the universal appeal of Tan's audience-pleasing novels -- the recurrent "Chinese" theme that rings true in English and in translation into Danish, Czech, or Tagalog -- is that adult children (especially daughters)
NEWS
November 26, 1999
Bernard Klatzko,73, a researcher, author and record producer specializing in acoustic blues and early jazz, died Nov. 15 at North Shore Hospital in Glen Cove, N.Y., of complications from lymphoma.In the mid-1960s, Mr. Klatzko and the author Gayle Wardlow traveled to the Mississippi Delta looking for people who knew blues singers like Charley Patton, Son House and Skip James. His interviews and his 78-rpm recordings of early jazz and country blues became source material for archival reissues from the Origin Jazz Library and Yazoo records.
NEWS
By Anita Finkel and Anita Finkel,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 29, 1995
"The Hundred Secret Senses," by Amy Tan. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 358 pages. $24.95 Shamelessly manipulative, cloyingly sentimental, blatantly false and phony - yes, it's a new, sure-to-be-best-selling Amy Tan novel streaking into town. The word "seductive" is sometimes applied to Ms. Tan's prose - a point readily granted, with the proviso that, in addition to a certain slick attractiveness, "seductive" connotes calculation and even a degree of contempt."The Hundred Secret Senses" tells the story of two half-sisters.
NEWS
By Judith Wynn | January 22, 1995
Is it any coincidence that literature by and about Chinese people attracts major attention in the United States whenever we're having major economic troubles? The Depression of the 1930s saw West Virginia-born novelist Pearl Buck win best-sellerdom and the Nobel Prize with her "Good Earth" trilogy despite indignant howls from American belletrists that the woman couldn't write her way out of a paper bag.In this era of recession and layoffs, the hardships endured by the characters of Amy Tan ("The Kitchen God's Wife")
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | September 27, 1993
When Amy Tan considered whether her successful novel "The Joy Luck Club" should ever be adapted as a movie, she had more than the usual author's qualms about retaining the essence of her creation."
NEWS
By Judith Wynn | January 22, 1995
Is it any coincidence that literature by and about Chinese people attracts major attention in the United States whenever we're having major economic troubles? The Depression of the 1930s saw West Virginia-born novelist Pearl Buck win best-sellerdom and the Nobel Prize with her "Good Earth" trilogy despite indignant howls from American belletrists that the woman couldn't write her way out of a paper bag.In this era of recession and layoffs, the hardships endured by the characters of Amy Tan ("The Kitchen God's Wife")
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Schwarzbaum and By Lisa Schwarzbaum,Special to the Sun | February 25, 2001
"The Bonesetter's Daughter," by Amy Tan. G.P. Putnam's Sons. 353 pages. $25.95. Ingest enough of Amy Tan's stories and even a reader from the American heartland might feel Chinese. Because once you wander past the very Asian ghosts, superstitions, salutations and English-as-a-second-language locutions, the universal appeal of Tan's audience-pleasing novels -- the recurrent "Chinese" theme that rings true in English and in translation into Danish, Czech, or Tagalog -- is that adult children (especially daughters)
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 30, 1991
Washington -- This time, her name is above the title on the book jacket. She's being feted at splashy publishing parties, and her promotional tour will take her not just across the country but over the Atlantic. The transformation of Amy Tan from surprise discovery of 1989 to established commodity of 1991 is complete.Which has netted her, to date, fame, fortune and two cracked teeth, the result of the nocturnal gnashings of an author who hit the top her first time out and now faced the dreaded sophomore jinx that has bedeviled other promising writers.
NEWS
By Joan Mooney and Joan Mooney,Ms. Mooney is a writer living in Washington | June 9, 1991
THE KITCHEN GOD'S WIFE.Amy Tan.Putnam.415 pages. $21.95. Amy Tan's much-awaited second novel has a good deal in common with "The Joy Luck Club" -- good news for her many fans. It is not a self-imitation, but readers will recognize her voice.Once again, Ms. Tan alternates between narration by a San Francisco-born daughter and her Chinese-born mother. Pearl, the daughter, conveys the familiar feeling of impatience when her mother, Winnie, clings to her old-fashioned ways or makes emotional demands that a Chinese mother considers it her daughter's duty to fulfill.
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