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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | May 10, 1994
There's no "Stand" tonight -- ABC is taking the night off rather than pre-empt "Roseanne" and "NYPD Blue." For entertainment, it's the network to watch anyway; for more serious fare, tune to PBS and "Frontline."* "A Perry Mason Mystery: The Case of the Lethal Lifestyle." (8-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Almost 25 years ago, Hal Holbrook starred as "The Senator," one of several rotating "wheel" elements in an umbrella show called "The Bold Ones." Tonight he plays the latest attorney presented under the Perry Mason banner, suggesting that life is indeed cyclical and that there are wheels within wheels.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 14, 2003
While Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World storms into the Charles this weekend - and as worldwide audiences await Tom Cruise as The Last Samurai - the theater will also present a rip-roaring period classic as part of its Mifune-Kurosawa series. First released in 1958, The Hidden Fortress, a Japanese medieval entertainment, renders a comedy of ethical equilibrium as a sublime 16th-century civil-war epic. At the center is a righteous, ornery princess in disguise, piercing enemy lines to seek sanctuary in a friendly province, and a valiant, no-nonsense general (Toshiro Mifune)
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By Henry Sheehan and Henry Sheehan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 1998
In his first feature film, "In the Company of Men," writer-director Neil LaBute used two young corporate employees' pursuit and sexual humiliation of a secretary to portray relations between the sexes as a cruel male power trip.In his new film, "Your Friends & Neighbors," LaBute still hews to his vision of men as brutes. Only now he has expanded it; the women are emotional pigs, too. The movie follows the infidelities of three friends from college, now affluent professionals, and their current lovers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 21, 2002
With the birth of Miranda's son on Sex and the City last season, making Sarah Jessica Parker's character pregnant as well probably would have been series suicide. So producers of the hit HBO comedy followed shows like Judging Amy, Providence and Cheers, which hid their female stars' bulges instead of writing the pregnancies into the scripts. (Of course, Parker's stylish Carrie Bradshaw character, a sex columnist, didn't allow her to don a convenient concealer -- like the baggy flowing judge's robes that helped Judging Amy's Amy Brenneman.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 26, 1994
At last, a busy day. Watch for reports about today's multiracial elections in South Africa. Then choose from among a well-intentioned anti-violence special on CBS and Fox, an old "NYPD Blue" and so on. But beware: programming today and tomorrow on the broadcast networks and news channels could be pre-empted by coverage of events leading up to former President Richard M. Nixon's funeral.* "The Dreamer of Oz" (8-10 p.m., WRC, Channel 4) -- John Ritter stars as the fanciful writer, whose life story is told -- and whose imaginings are brought to life cleverly and seamlessly.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 30, 1993
Tonight's TV is full of options, and also has its share of surprises. There is, for example, an "America's Most Wanted" that sounds most interesting, and a new Valerie Bertinelli telemovie that actually is most interesting.* "Murder of Innocence" (9-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Here's one that caught me totally off guard. It's the latest Valerie Bertinelli telemovie, yet this one is more harrowing, polished and impressive than anything else she's ever done. She portrays a woman descending into insanity -- and her performance is very good, and commendably restrained.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | July 21, 2002
With the birth of Miranda's son on Sex and the City last season, making Sarah Jessica Parker's character pregnant as well probably would have been series suicide. So producers of the hit HBO comedy followed shows like Judging Amy, Providence and Cheers, which hid their female stars' bulges instead of writing the pregnancies into the scripts. (Of course, Parker's stylish Carrie Bradshaw character, a sex columnist, didn't allow her to don a convenient concealer -- like the baggy flowing judge's robes that helped Judging Amy's Amy Brenneman.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 14, 2003
While Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World storms into the Charles this weekend - and as worldwide audiences await Tom Cruise as The Last Samurai - the theater will also present a rip-roaring period classic as part of its Mifune-Kurosawa series. First released in 1958, The Hidden Fortress, a Japanese medieval entertainment, renders a comedy of ethical equilibrium as a sublime 16th-century civil-war epic. At the center is a righteous, ornery princess in disguise, piercing enemy lines to seek sanctuary in a friendly province, and a valiant, no-nonsense general (Toshiro Mifune)
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1996
NEW YORK -- All this talk of Sylvester Stallone's make-over from monosyllabic muscleman to pudgy Everyman has disturbed my sense of order so much that I beg him to join me in pushups. Just a few, I urge, entering his Central Park South hotel suite. "No, no, no," he says, explaining later, "A little listlessness has set in."The slight bulge hanging over his slacks as he sits in front of a half-smoked cigar is proof. But the changes brewing inside his gut aren't as apparent, so Stallone announces them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 28, 1999
The taxi cab pulls up in the driveway of a rambling, ivy-covered, two-story Cape Cod painted picket-fence white. Leaves are falling from ancient oaks and elms as a young woman gets out of the cab, looks at the house and takes a deep breath as if trying to inhale it all. "Enjoy your visit," the cab driver says as he pulls away. "Not visiting," the woman replies. "I think I'm home." The scene is from the pilot for "Providence," the surprise hit of last season. The drama about a plastic surgeon in her 30s who chucks her lucrative Beverly Hills practice and Malibu lifestyle to return to her hometown of Providence, R.I., and a low-paying job in a community clinic is so popular that it has inspired copycat dramas like "Judging Amy" on CBS this fall.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 28, 1999
The taxi cab pulls up in the driveway of a rambling, ivy-covered, two-story Cape Cod painted picket-fence white. Leaves are falling from ancient oaks and elms as a young woman gets out of the cab, looks at the house and takes a deep breath as if trying to inhale it all. "Enjoy your visit," the cab driver says as he pulls away. "Not visiting," the woman replies. "I think I'm home." The scene is from the pilot for "Providence," the surprise hit of last season. The drama about a plastic surgeon in her 30s who chucks her lucrative Beverly Hills practice and Malibu lifestyle to return to her hometown of Providence, R.I., and a low-paying job in a community clinic is so popular that it has inspired copycat dramas like "Judging Amy" on CBS this fall.
FEATURES
By Henry Sheehan and Henry Sheehan,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 28, 1998
In his first feature film, "In the Company of Men," writer-director Neil LaBute used two young corporate employees' pursuit and sexual humiliation of a secretary to portray relations between the sexes as a cruel male power trip.In his new film, "Your Friends & Neighbors," LaBute still hews to his vision of men as brutes. Only now he has expanded it; the women are emotional pigs, too. The movie follows the infidelities of three friends from college, now affluent professionals, and their current lovers.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 6, 1996
NEW YORK -- All this talk of Sylvester Stallone's make-over from monosyllabic muscleman to pudgy Everyman has disturbed my sense of order so much that I beg him to join me in pushups. Just a few, I urge, entering his Central Park South hotel suite. "No, no, no," he says, explaining later, "A little listlessness has set in."The slight bulge hanging over his slacks as he sits in front of a half-smoked cigar is proof. But the changes brewing inside his gut aren't as apparent, so Stallone announces them.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | May 10, 1994
There's no "Stand" tonight -- ABC is taking the night off rather than pre-empt "Roseanne" and "NYPD Blue." For entertainment, it's the network to watch anyway; for more serious fare, tune to PBS and "Frontline."* "A Perry Mason Mystery: The Case of the Lethal Lifestyle." (8-10 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Almost 25 years ago, Hal Holbrook starred as "The Senator," one of several rotating "wheel" elements in an umbrella show called "The Bold Ones." Tonight he plays the latest attorney presented under the Perry Mason banner, suggesting that life is indeed cyclical and that there are wheels within wheels.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | April 26, 1994
At last, a busy day. Watch for reports about today's multiracial elections in South Africa. Then choose from among a well-intentioned anti-violence special on CBS and Fox, an old "NYPD Blue" and so on. But beware: programming today and tomorrow on the broadcast networks and news channels could be pre-empted by coverage of events leading up to former President Richard M. Nixon's funeral.* "The Dreamer of Oz" (8-10 p.m., WRC, Channel 4) -- John Ritter stars as the fanciful writer, whose life story is told -- and whose imaginings are brought to life cleverly and seamlessly.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 30, 1993
Tonight's TV is full of options, and also has its share of surprises. There is, for example, an "America's Most Wanted" that sounds most interesting, and a new Valerie Bertinelli telemovie that actually is most interesting.* "Murder of Innocence" (9-11 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Here's one that caught me totally off guard. It's the latest Valerie Bertinelli telemovie, yet this one is more harrowing, polished and impressive than anything else she's ever done. She portrays a woman descending into insanity -- and her performance is very good, and commendably restrained.
NEWS
September 12, 1994
"NYPD Blue," ABC's controversial police drama, failed last night to set a record for most Emmys won in a season. It needed to succeed in all the categories for which it was nominated to top "Hill Street Blues," which holds the record with eight.Leigh Taylor-Young of "Picket Fences" beat out the competition in the supporting actress category, which included Sharon Lawrence and Amy Brenneman of "NYPD Blue." And in the supporting actor category, Fyvush Finkel of "Picket Fences" beat Gordon Clapp and Nick Turturro of "NYPD Blue."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 5, 2007
The Jane Austen Book Club is a movie ready-made for a cinema subdivision of Oprah's Book Club. Just consider the potential: This contemporary comedy-drama of five women and a man analyzing one Austen novel each month would foment discussion of six Austen books and Karen Joy Fowler's witty 2004 novel (also called The Jane Austen Book Club), along with such standby talk-show topics as infidelity and female friendship. An Oprah Winfrey-brand phenomenon would have to be more provocative than the lulling movie writer-director Robin Swicord has made from Fowler's peppy, humorous pastiche.
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