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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Southern belle. Fairy-tale princess. Nun. Pioneer aviatrix. Is there any role Amy Adams can't play? Maybe. It's hard imagining her as a victim in the next Friday 13th sequel, or as a lethal cyborg in the Terminator franchise. But just about everything else seems possible, especially after her star turn as a saucy Amelia Earhart in the summer-blockbuster in waiting, Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian. "I don't know that there's a better actress in her generation," says Smithsonian director Shawn Levy, who was in Washington on Thursday evening for the movie's world premiere at the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum.
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January 1, 2010
Next Friday Broken Embraces: (Sony Pictures Classics) A screenwriter analyzes the mysteries surrounding a car accident 14 years earlier that took his sight and killed the love of his life (Penelope Cruz).: Daybreakers : (Lionsgate) Humans have become an endangered species, hunted and forced into hiding after a mysterious plague transforms the majority of the world's population into vampires. With Ethan Hawke. Leap Year: (Universal Pictures) A woman follows her boyfriend to Ireland to ask him to marry her, but complications arise when she is stranded and must enlist the help of a surly Irishman.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 7, 2008
In Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day, making whoopee is divine but sisterhood is powerful. This screwball frolic set in 1939 London stars Amy Adams as would-be West End headliner Delysia Lafosse and Frances McDormand as Miss Pettigrew, the failed governess who winds up as her social secretary. It's an unusual and engaging romantic comedy because it's mostly about how these women ready each other for real love. Their friendship is the fulcrum on which success with men is based. Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (Focus)
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By Michael Sragow | December 25, 2009
Precious . . (4 STARS) The biggest surprise of 2009 was this electrically compassionate look at an abused young woman (Gabourey Sidibe) and her escape from the control of a horrifying mother (Mo'Nique). These two create an extraordinary dance of simmering rebellion and sadistic manipulation. But the whole ensemble is aces, including Mariah Carrey as a responsible, no-nonsense social worker and Paula Patton as a dedicated teacher. Under Lee Daniels' direction, you can't look away for a nanosecond.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 21, 2007
Enchanted will make some enchanted evening for the dating crowd and also be a boisterous Saturday matinee for youngsters. This tale of fairy-tale characters who tumble down a well in the storybook land of Andalasia and come rocketing up a manhole in New York's Times Square has a piquant idea and enough good jokes to overcome its uneven moviemaking and uncertain tone. Best of all, it has Amy Adams as the gorgeous maiden Giselle - and she carries the film gracefully and uproariously on her creamy shoulders.
NEWS
September 13, 1990
TEXT: Head coach: David Lord (4th season) Assistant coaches: Ed Libely and Lee Wood.1989 record: 9-5, lost to Chesapeake in region semifinals.Returnees: Senior Meredith Huffines (MF); juniors Ava Tasker (MF), Dawn Frederick (stopper), Michelle Myer (wing) and Holly Mowry (G).Newcomers: Freshman Amy Adams (striker).Coach's outlook: "This is a completely different team. We lost 12 seniors from last year, so we're real young. We only have five starters back, but we have some real talented kids.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow | December 25, 2009
Precious . . (4 STARS) The biggest surprise of 2009 was this electrically compassionate look at an abused young woman (Gabourey Sidibe) and her escape from the control of a horrifying mother (Mo'Nique). These two create an extraordinary dance of simmering rebellion and sadistic manipulation. But the whole ensemble is aces, including Mariah Carrey as a responsible, no-nonsense social worker and Paula Patton as a dedicated teacher. Under Lee Daniels' direction, you can't look away for a nanosecond.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 23, 2007
Finding the fresh response in obvious situations has become a specialty for Amy Adams - never more so than in Enchanted, in which she plays a fairy-tale beauty named Giselle who tumbles down a well in the magic kingdom of Andalasia and ends up peering out from a manhole in Times Square. Over the phone from Manhattan, Adams says that when she read the Enchanted script she saw that "it was a different incarnation of the classic fish-out-of-water story, the way it was told." The character of Giselle revved up her comic engine.
FEATURES
January 1, 2010
Next Friday Broken Embraces: (Sony Pictures Classics) A screenwriter analyzes the mysteries surrounding a car accident 14 years earlier that took his sight and killed the love of his life (Penelope Cruz).: Daybreakers : (Lionsgate) Humans have become an endangered species, hunted and forced into hiding after a mysterious plague transforms the majority of the world's population into vampires. With Ethan Hawke. Leap Year: (Universal Pictures) A woman follows her boyfriend to Ireland to ask him to marry her, but complications arise when she is stranded and must enlist the help of a surly Irishman.
FEATURES
February 26, 2008
Almost 750 readers weighed in at baltimoresun.com on who they thought was the best-dressed on the Oscar red carpet this year: 28.0 percent Anne Hathaway 21.0 percent Katherine Heigl 12.5 percent Heidi Klum 11.4 percent Someone else 9.4 percent Jennifer Garner 6.7 percent Marion Cotillard 5.9 percent Nicole Kidman 3.5 percent Miley Ray Cyrus 0.9 percent Amy Adams 0.7 percent Jennifer Hudson
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | May 17, 2009
WASHINGTON - -Southern belle. Fairy-tale princess. Nun. Pioneer aviatrix. Is there any role Amy Adams can't play? Maybe. It's hard imagining her as a victim in the next Friday 13th sequel, or as a lethal cyborg in the Terminator franchise. But just about everything else seems possible, especially after her star turn as a saucy Amelia Earhart in the summer-blockbuster in waiting, Night at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian. "I don't know that there's a better actress in her generation," says Smithsonian director Shawn Levy, who was in Washington on Thursday evening for the movie's world premiere at the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 7, 2008
In Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day, making whoopee is divine but sisterhood is powerful. This screwball frolic set in 1939 London stars Amy Adams as would-be West End headliner Delysia Lafosse and Frances McDormand as Miss Pettigrew, the failed governess who winds up as her social secretary. It's an unusual and engaging romantic comedy because it's mostly about how these women ready each other for real love. Their friendship is the fulcrum on which success with men is based. Miss Pettigrew Lives for a Day (Focus)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 23, 2007
Finding the fresh response in obvious situations has become a specialty for Amy Adams - never more so than in Enchanted, in which she plays a fairy-tale beauty named Giselle who tumbles down a well in the magic kingdom of Andalasia and ends up peering out from a manhole in Times Square. Over the phone from Manhattan, Adams says that when she read the Enchanted script she saw that "it was a different incarnation of the classic fish-out-of-water story, the way it was told." The character of Giselle revved up her comic engine.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | November 21, 2007
Enchanted will make some enchanted evening for the dating crowd and also be a boisterous Saturday matinee for youngsters. This tale of fairy-tale characters who tumble down a well in the storybook land of Andalasia and come rocketing up a manhole in New York's Times Square has a piquant idea and enough good jokes to overcome its uneven moviemaking and uncertain tone. Best of all, it has Amy Adams as the gorgeous maiden Giselle - and she carries the film gracefully and uproariously on her creamy shoulders.
NEWS
September 13, 1990
TEXT: Head coach: David Lord (4th season) Assistant coaches: Ed Libely and Lee Wood.1989 record: 9-5, lost to Chesapeake in region semifinals.Returnees: Senior Meredith Huffines (MF); juniors Ava Tasker (MF), Dawn Frederick (stopper), Michelle Myer (wing) and Holly Mowry (G).Newcomers: Freshman Amy Adams (striker).Coach's outlook: "This is a completely different team. We lost 12 seniors from last year, so we're real young. We only have five starters back, but we have some real talented kids.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 16, 2005
A junebug is a big scarab beetle that comes out flying in May or June to eat leaves and beget larvae that feed on the roots of plants and grass. Junebug pivots on two gorgeous human junebugs who are trying to get or stay attached to a tight, rooted family down in Dixie. Madeleine (Embeth Davidtz), a Chicago dealer in outsider art, marries a smooth transplanted Southerner, George (Alessandro Nivola), after a whirlwind six-month courtship. She has never met his mom and dad. Ashley (Amy Adams)
NEWS
By Jill Rosen | February 23, 2009
Though some feared the economy would cast its gloomy shadow over the red carpet, if anything, stars glittered even more last night, as if to spite the recession. In statement necklaces with fat jewels that couldn't be ignored. With shoulders bared. With hair pulled loosely into seductive buns. With flamboyant sequins, luxe beads, compelling architectural details and fabric pleated in delicate wedding-cake layers. Some chose vibrant jewel tones - notably Amy Adams in a fitted ruby gown by Carolina Herrera, Freida Pinto in a sapphire, Bollywood-inspired dress by John Galliano and Heidi Klum in a bright rose Roland Mouret.
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