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By Sheridan Lyons | May 4, 1991
A federal jury took less than two hours yesterday to convict a former director of public works at the U.S. Naval Academy of conspiracy for having demanded gifts and Amway purchases from a contractor in return for work.Capt. James E. Weston, 47, now retired in Henderson, Nev., was convicted on seven counts: conspiracy, five counts of seeking and accepting gifts while serving as a public official and obstructing the 1990 investigation.He wore a wide smile after the verdict was announced, as he had done Wednesday in cheerfully telling the jury how he repeatedly asked Annapolis contractor Carroll R. Dunton to buy items at a builder's discount for his home on the academy grounds.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and By Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | May 27, 2001
Kimberly E. Rice had a crush on Eric D. DeGross from the moment she saw him. But it took six years for Eric to regard Kim as anything other than a good friend. The two met in Pikesville in 1994 when Kim joined a local Amway network. The direct-sales company offers household products and other items through its members, who sell the products in return for a percentage of the sales. Eric, 43, had joined the company in 1988. At the time, he also owned his own auto-repair business. When Kim joined Amway, she was employed full time as a lawyer with a Baltimore firm.
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NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | May 6, 1991
Judy Haxton, forewoman of the jury that convicted retired U.S. Navy Capt. James E. Weston of charges of conspiracy, bribery and obstruction of justice, was asked after court what convinced the panel of his guilt.She answered in two words: "Captain Weston."The jury deliberated only two hours and 15 minutes Friday, including a 35-minute lunch, in U.S. District Court in Baltimore before convicting Weston of seven criminal charges.The indictment charged him with official misconduct -- receiving gifts from, and selling Amway products to contractors with whom he conducted official business as the academy's public works officer from 1985 to 1989, steering contracts to his Amway customers and hiding documents from a grand jury last year.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1997
Armed with only a computer, phone and fax machine, Patricia Garrity is an unlikely lawbreaker.But by operating her computer and fax machine from her Timonium townhouse, the meeting planner is violating Baltimore County zoning laws.And, most likely, so are the neighborhood Amway salesman, Avon lady and Tupperware vendor.Now, to reflect the realities of work in the 1990s, Baltimore County is considering changing its zoning regulations. Rather than listing acceptable or unacceptable businesses, as surrounding localities do, the county wants to regulate them according to the impact on neighborhoods.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joanne E. Morvay and By Joanne E. Morvay,Special to the Sun | May 27, 2001
Kimberly E. Rice had a crush on Eric D. DeGross from the moment she saw him. But it took six years for Eric to regard Kim as anything other than a good friend. The two met in Pikesville in 1994 when Kim joined a local Amway network. The direct-sales company offers household products and other items through its members, who sell the products in return for a percentage of the sales. Eric, 43, had joined the company in 1988. At the time, he also owned his own auto-repair business. When Kim joined Amway, she was employed full time as a lawyer with a Baltimore firm.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | July 31, 1991
A former U.S. Navy captain was sentenced yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to 40 months in prison for conspiracy, bribery and obstruction of justice charges stemming from his dealings with contractors at the U.S. Naval Academy.James E. Weston, who was the public works officer at the academy, is free on his own recognizance and will surrender to federal marshals on Sept. 9. In addition to the prison sentence, Judge John R. Hargrove ordered that Weston, 47, be supervised for three years after his release from prison and that he pay a $7,500 fine along with $350 in court costs.
SPORTS
By Larry Guest and Larry Guest,Orlando Sentinel | September 22, 1991
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Talk to a half-dozen civic and business leaders in Grand Rapids, Mich., and the book on the DeVos family member now most directly at the wheel of the Orlando Magic is this: admirable, amicable, compassionate, honorable, community-conscious, intelligent, but -- is he tough enough?Dick DeVos, eldest son of the charismatic Amway billionaire who formally announced Thursday he and his family purchased the Magic, is a business and political specialist experienced far beyond his 35 years on this globe.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1997
Armed with only a computer, phone and fax machine, Patricia Garrity is an unlikely lawbreaker.But by operating her computer and fax machine from her Timonium townhouse, the meeting planner is violating Baltimore County zoning laws.And, most likely, so are the neighborhood Amway salesman, Avon lady and Tupperware vendor.Now, to reflect the realities of work in the 1990s, Baltimore County is considering changing its zoning regulations. Rather than listing acceptable or unacceptable businesses, as surrounding localities do, the county wants to regulate them according to the impact on neighborhoods.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 3, 1996
CINCINNATI -- Procter & Gamble Co. said yesterday that it has added Amway Corp. to a lawsuit that accuses an Amway distributor of spreading false statements linking P&G with Satanism.Cincinnati-based P&G, the largest U.S. consumer-products company, filed the suit against Randy Haugen in August, alleging that he used Amway's electronic voice mail system to spread the rumor to other Amway distributors.The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Utah, is the 15th such legal action initiated by P&G over the years.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | July 30, 1991
Retired Navy Capt. James E. Weston was sentenced today to 40 months in federal prison without parole and was fined $7,500 for soliciting gifts and Amway business from contractors while he was the U.S. Naval Academy's public works officer.Weston, convicted in May of conspiracy, bribery and obstruction of justice, continued to protest his innocence today in remarks to Judge John R. Hargrove in U.S. District Court in Baltimore."I am deeply sorry to have had any personal business dealings with Dunton Contracting or other contractors, even though my intention was not to give preferential treatment to anyone in the use of government funds," Weston said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG BUSINESS NEWS | April 3, 1996
CINCINNATI -- Procter & Gamble Co. said yesterday that it has added Amway Corp. to a lawsuit that accuses an Amway distributor of spreading false statements linking P&G with Satanism.Cincinnati-based P&G, the largest U.S. consumer-products company, filed the suit against Randy Haugen in August, alleging that he used Amway's electronic voice mail system to spread the rumor to other Amway distributors.The lawsuit, filed in U.S. District Court in Utah, is the 15th such legal action initiated by P&G over the years.
SPORTS
By Larry Guest and Larry Guest,Orlando Sentinel | September 22, 1991
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Talk to a half-dozen civic and business leaders in Grand Rapids, Mich., and the book on the DeVos family member now most directly at the wheel of the Orlando Magic is this: admirable, amicable, compassionate, honorable, community-conscious, intelligent, but -- is he tough enough?Dick DeVos, eldest son of the charismatic Amway billionaire who formally announced Thursday he and his family purchased the Magic, is a business and political specialist experienced far beyond his 35 years on this globe.
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson | July 31, 1991
A former U.S. Navy captain was sentenced yesterday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore to 40 months in prison for conspiracy, bribery and obstruction of justice charges stemming from his dealings with contractors at the U.S. Naval Academy.James E. Weston, who was the public works officer at the academy, is free on his own recognizance and will surrender to federal marshals on Sept. 9. In addition to the prison sentence, Judge John R. Hargrove ordered that Weston, 47, be supervised for three years after his release from prison and that he pay a $7,500 fine along with $350 in court costs.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | July 30, 1991
Retired Navy Capt. James E. Weston was sentenced today to 40 months in federal prison without parole and was fined $7,500 for soliciting gifts and Amway business from contractors while he was the U.S. Naval Academy's public works officer.Weston, convicted in May of conspiracy, bribery and obstruction of justice, continued to protest his innocence today in remarks to Judge John R. Hargrove in U.S. District Court in Baltimore."I am deeply sorry to have had any personal business dealings with Dunton Contracting or other contractors, even though my intention was not to give preferential treatment to anyone in the use of government funds," Weston said.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | May 6, 1991
Judy Haxton, forewoman of the jury that convicted retired U.S. Navy Capt. James E. Weston of charges of conspiracy, bribery and obstruction of justice, was asked after court what convinced the panel of his guilt.She answered in two words: "Captain Weston."The jury deliberated only two hours and 15 minutes Friday, including a 35-minute lunch, in U.S. District Court in Baltimore before convicting Weston of seven criminal charges.The indictment charged him with official misconduct -- receiving gifts from, and selling Amway products to contractors with whom he conducted official business as the academy's public works officer from 1985 to 1989, steering contracts to his Amway customers and hiding documents from a grand jury last year.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons | May 4, 1991
A federal jury took less than two hours yesterday to convict a former director of public works at the U.S. Naval Academy of conspiracy for having demanded gifts and Amway purchases from a contractor in return for work.Capt. James E. Weston, 47, now retired in Henderson, Nev., was convicted on seven counts: conspiracy, five counts of seeking and accepting gifts while serving as a public official and obstructing the 1990 investigation.He wore a wide smile after the verdict was announced, as he had done Wednesday in cheerfully telling the jury how he repeatedly asked Annapolis contractor Carroll R. Dunton to buy items at a builder's discount for his home on the academy grounds.
NEWS
December 8, 2004
Jay Van Andel, 80, the co-founder of Amway Corp. who helped parlay neighborhood soap sales into a billion-dollar business and later became a leading philanthropist for conservative causes, died of heart failure yesterday in Grand Rapids, Mich. Mr. Van Andel and Richard DeVos started selling diet supplements in the 1950s and coined the name Amway, an abbreviation of "American Way," in 1959, when they expanded into household cleaning products. Amway made its fortune by relying on a worldwide network of independent, mom-and-pop distributors.
NEWS
By Kelly Gilbert and Kelly Gilbert,Evening Sun Staff | April 26, 1991
Retired Navy Capt. James E. Weston repeatedly withheld his Amway business records from a federal grand jury during an investigation of alleged contract corruption at the U.S. Naval Academy, an FBI agent has told a jury at the captain's criminal trial here.Agent Thomas Drewry also testified that Weston, in an FBI interview last June, denied receiving gifts from, or doing outside business with, contractors who bid on Navy jobs while he was public works officer at the academy from 1985 to 1989.
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