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NEWS
December 6, 2006
An editorial that appeared Tuesday should have stated that Baltimore loses about $10 million a year in uncollected admission and amusement taxes on licensed video poker games. By passing a bill to allow more so-called amusement games in bars and other businesses, a City Council committee this week may have attached inadvertent meaning to Baltimore's "Get in on it" slogan.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Lauren Cox, the wife of Ravens long snapper Morgan Cox, was not amused by Drake's song about cheating athletes at the ESPYs this week. Cox wrote a rambling blog post Thursday titled " Drake, take your 'side pieces' and shove it " -- a sharp contrast to her other posts, which usually discuss Bible verses. It's a little hard to parse Cox's writing, but apparently she was incensed that the event celebrated Michael Sam coming out as the first openly gay current NFL player while Drake's performance made light of athletes' infidelities.
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TRAVEL
By Donna M. Owens, Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2011
Think amusement parks are just for kids? Think again. There's nothing like screaming aboard a careening roller coaster, gorging on funnel cake and popcorn, or splashing in a spray of water to bring out your inner child. The advent of spring means parks across the region are now open for business, albeit with abridged, seasonal hours. That gives early birds ample time to catch a sneak preview before the summer crowds descend. Many parks are launching new rides, shows and attractions aimed at all ages.
TRAVEL
By Dan Singer, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Jolly Roger Parks is celebrating 50 years in Ocean City on Tuesday with a ceremony at its flagship amusement park on Coastal Highway. Charles "Buddy" Jenkins, the founder and owner, laid the groundwork for Jolly Roger Parks in 1964 when he met renowned golfer Arnold Palmer and collaborated with him to open the Arnold Palmer Putting Course and Driving Range on 30th Street. During the years that followed, Jenkins added several rides and attractions to the property, and in 1974 he acquired the rights to open a second amusement park on Ocean City's downtown pier.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | July 22, 2010
With a handful of amusement parks within easy driving distance, Baltimoreans can spend their summer weekends sampling breath-taking roller coasters, cavorting with some of their kids' favorite animated characters or getting soaked even though they're miles from the nearest ocean. And for those who haven't been in a few years — maybe it's time to once again sample the simple summer pleasures that only an amusement park can provide. Here's a look at five parks within 200 miles of the center of Baltimore, along with a sampling of what new rides and attractions they have to offer.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | February 16, 1992
County Executive Robert R. Neall issued his first veto Thursday, nixing a seemingly innocuous bill allowing carnivals and lawn parties onSundays.Calling Councilman Edward Middlebrooks' bill "hasty and partial legislation" and "piece-meal tinkering," Neall's brief veto message ordered a comprehensive study of amusement licensing. Such a study is sorely needed, he said Friday, because the licensing code hasnot been updated since the early 1950s."We could have 10 bills like this on amusements, and we'd end up with a polyglot," Neall said.
NEWS
By Staff report | March 3, 1992
County Executive Robert R. Neall has appointed a new seven-member commission to study amusement licenses with the goal of revising licensing regulations.The Anne Arundel Amusement License Commission wascreated last fall through a County Council bill. It is charged with revising regulations and laws concerning bingo, parades, coin-operated machines and other amusement activities.The commission will meet tomorrow for the first time. Each memberwill serve a two-year term. They are:* D. Boone Wayson of Annapolis, owner of Wayson's Bingo.
NEWS
By Lynn Anderson and Lynn Anderson,Sun Reporter | April 26, 2007
A bill that could drastically increase the number of video poker games, pool tables and other amusement devices in Baltimore bars and convenience stores has been sent back to committee for amendments. City Councilman Robert W. Curran asked that the legislation be remanded to the Land Use and Transportation Committee on Monday. In a memo obtained by The Sun, Curran said he wanted the committee to add amendments that would increase licensing fees for the games. The bill was amended once before to increase such fees from $180 to $350.
NEWS
By C. FRASER SMITH | February 12, 2006
The would-be gaming entrepreneur had a question. "If slot machine gambling is illegal, why do we have it on every street corner?" He waved his arm in an arc that embraced the universe of hypocrisy he saw spreading out in front of him. Who didn't know about the Baltimore area's not-so-secret slots industry? The slots impresario-in-waiting was not worried about any corrupting influence or the sight of miscreants trifling with the majesty of the law. He wanted a piece of the action, a much bigger piece.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | April 20, 1998
Thomas Richard Beers, a scientist and engineer who pursued a lifelong love affair with the arts, died of a heart attack Friday at his home in Roland Park. He was 85.During a long and colorful career, Mr. Beers promoted a traveling opera company, managed the old Carlin's Amusement Park, and helped create top-secret radar defense systems for Westinghouse Electric Corp. in Linthicum.In his spare time, he played the piano and organ, performed in amateur opera and musical productions, served as an on-air reader for the Radio Reading Service for the Blind, and restored antique cars.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2014
In advance of tonight's serious debate about big issues in the race for governor, here are two amusing - intentionally or not - contributions to the political discourse this week, courtesy of Douglas F. Gansler's campaign. On Wednesday, his campaign publicized an original song written by a supporter. If you're wondering what rhymes with "Gansler," the answer is: "Gansler. "  The lyrics say "Doug Gansler" 14 times in less than 90 seconds, plus eek out another three mentions of "Doug" and two more of "Mr. Gansler.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2013
It was a fantasyland created to celebrate innocent storybook tales, yet it was integrated nearly a decade before civil rights laws demanded it. That was the unusual mix of sweetness and humanity that could be found for decades at the Enchanted Forest in Ellicott City. Their sentimental pull still powerful nearly six decades later, the Ellicott City amusement park's figures and structures, which found a second home eight years ago at Clark's Elioak Farm, will soon enjoy yet another revival in the public's consciousness.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | July 26, 2013
I was not prepared for the dramatic and clear view of the Bay Bridge that I had on my recent visit to Edgemere. I went in search of the old Bay Shore amusement park, where Baltimore families once traveled by streetcar to spend the day, and I found a delightful summertime oasis, minus the old carousel, roller coaster and bowling alley. And while many of the 1906 park pavilions and rather grand architectural pieces vanished after World War II, enough survives to satisfy anyone with an amateur's interest in archaeology.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 7, 2013
The wooden roller coaster and the Dixie Ballroom are long gone. Gone, too, from Gwynn Oak Park is the merry-go-round where a toddler in a pink dress took a historic spin on a summer afternoon a half-century ago. That simple pleasure, a first for a black child at the formerly segregated Gwynn Oak Amusement Park, had become possible just weeks earlier in 1963 when hundreds of black and white protesters thrust Baltimore into the national spotlight...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
Is there a cross-dresser in every man just dying to leap out and into some lacy outfit: Maybe so. The Elks Club members at the heart of Jordan Harrison's modest play "Act a Lady," set in a Midwestern town during those frustrated days of Prohibition, leap at the chance to perform in drag during a charity event. What happens next, on and off the stage, adds up to a wry theatrical evening, as confirmed by the local premiere of "Act a Lady," courtesy of Iron Crow Theatre Company.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2013
Even as an experienced sailor, Peter McChesney said that racing the J/70 gives him a different kind of thrill. The 223/4-foot boat, the newest design of Rhode Island-based J/Boats, which began building its line in the late 1970s, will be the most popular entry in the prestigious Annapolis National Offshore One-Design (NOOD) Regatta Series, which will be held Friday through next Sunday. The third leg of the six-race series is expected to attract an estimated 1,000 sailors, with the top prize being a trip to the Top-Sider NOOD Regatta Championship in the British Virgin Islands in November.
FEATURES
By Dianna Marder and Dianna Marder,Knight-Ridder News Service | August 22, 1993
Elysburg, Pa. -- Grab the car keys. Pack the kids. Here's fun you can afford.It's Knoebels Grove, an amusement park that draws nearly a million folks each season. Yet, you may never have heard of it.That's not really so surprising, since the place is just about smack-dab in the middle of nowhere (actually, the middle of Pennsylvania is more like it, about 160 miles northwest of Philadelphia).It's an unlikely location for an amusement park -- one with a roller coaster that enthusiasts have ranked fifth-best in the nation -- sandwiched as it is between the East Branch of the Susquehanna River on the north and the fringe of the anthracite coal region on the south.
NEWS
By HUGH PEARSON | February 10, 1991
AT THE AGE of 33, two years into wearing them, I' discovering that dreadlocks are appropriately named. As much as I like them, I'm alternately amused and frustrated by people's reactions to my hair style.Dreadlocks are as ancient as Africa and India. The regal Masai warriors of Kenya sport them. But today dreadlocks are most often identified with the Rastafarians of Jamaica and, by extension, with reggae musicians.There are two ways to "create" dreadlocks. Due to the wool-like texture of most black people's hair, it can simply be twisted and will remain that way even after it is washed.
NEWS
April 9, 2013
Having co-hosted a pre-game radio show with John Unitas for four years while producing the radio broadcasts on WCBM for the Baltimore Colts, I think John would be laughing over the family feud about Joe Flacco portraying him in a movie. John would probably remark that Joe is a little too tall for the role. John had a great sense of humor, and I think he would have approved of Joe Flacco's own "golden arm. " As a Ravens season ticket holder, I can attest to both quarterbacks "coolness quotient.
TRAVEL
By Jake Fewster, The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2012
The eerie sound of a pipe organ fills the air on Ocean City 's boardwalk as families, couples and solitary fans enter the seaside ride filled with severed heads, torture chambers and other ghoulish delights. Trimper's Haunted House is a vacation staple that has stood in the same location since 1964. But this boardwalk icon is far more than a nostalgic reminder of summers past. The house is an important part of the legacy of Bill Tracy, master of dark rides, those amusement park staples that ferry patrons through interiors where lighting, sound and creative displays are designed to amuse - or terrify.
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