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Amputation

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By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
It's a typical scene at fire departments everywhere: lockers lining the garage, with coats hanging and boots at the ready for quick changes when an emergency calls. But at the Odenton Volunteer Fire Company one boot has a leg sticking out of it. Firefighter William Fisher returned to work at Odenton this month, eight months after having his right leg amputated below the knee, the result of a lingering injury from his Army service in Iraq. After intense rehabilitation, seemingly endless paperwork to prove that he met the National Fire Protection Association standards, and extensive work with a company to develop a special boot for his prosthetic leg, Fisher printed out dozens of copies of a certification declaring him fit for duty and placed them in everyone's mailbox at the station.
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NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 16, 2014
It's a typical scene at fire departments everywhere: lockers lining the garage, with coats hanging and boots at the ready for quick changes when an emergency calls. But at the Odenton Volunteer Fire Company one boot has a leg sticking out of it. Firefighter William Fisher returned to work at Odenton this month, eight months after having his right leg amputated below the knee, the result of a lingering injury from his Army service in Iraq. After intense rehabilitation, seemingly endless paperwork to prove that he met the National Fire Protection Association standards, and extensive work with a company to develop a special boot for his prosthetic leg, Fisher printed out dozens of copies of a certification declaring him fit for duty and placed them in everyone's mailbox at the station.
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HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
Over the 14 years since losing her right arm to a hollow-point bullet, Dana Burke was convinced she could feel herself pointing, pinching or waving as she motioned with the 5-inch-long limb the attack left behind. Still, she had to relearn how to pull her hair back in a ponytail and tie her shoes. It's a struggle to play horsie with her three children using only one arm for support, and she had to start off with a child's fat crayon to learn to write left-handed. But now, she has proof of what she knew all along.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2013
A 40-year-old construction worker had his right leg partially severed from his body after being struck by a piece of heavy machinery at a construction site in Odenton on Thursday morning, according to the Anne Arundel County Fire Department. Emergency personnel responded to the site in the 2600 block of Conway Road about 8:15 a.m. for a report of a man seriously injured and found the injured worker suffering from an "incomplete amputation" of his leg, the department said. The man was transported by a Maryland State Police helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, the department said.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2002
Patients with severe leg injuries fare equally well - or poorly - whether they have reconstructive surgery or lose their damaged limbs to amputation, says a study published today. The sobering truth, said doctors in Baltimore and elsewhere, is that 40 percent of patients remain severely disabled two years after their injuries, and half do not return to work, no matter which route they take. "If you have reconstruction, you're going to have more surgery, more hospitalizations and are at risk for complications of those surgeries," said Dr. Alan L. Jones, chief of orthopedic surgery at the University of Maryland Shock Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Erika Niedowski and Erika Niedowski,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2005
Twenty orthopedic surgeons in five states delivered the same awful news to Melissa Arnold: The best way to fix her young son Adam's short thigh bone was to cut off his leg and fit him with a prosthesis. "It was never an option for me," said Arnold, a freelance writer from Red Oak, Iowa, who sought medical opinions from Minnesota to Colorado. "I was quite certain that something like a short leg had to be fixed with something other than an amputation. It's too short, so you cut it off?" It took years of searching, but Arnold finally found another treatment.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN STAFF | May 10, 2002
They asked for donations and they asked for prayers yesterday at Oakland Mills High School. Mostly, they asked visitors to think about former student Rayna DuBose, because they could think of little else. DuBose, a freshman basketball player at Virginia Tech and a 2001 graduate of Oakland Mills, remained in good condition yesterday at the University of Virginia Medical Center, three days after she underwent amputation surgery of her hands and feet because of complications from meningitis.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1998
Two weeks and seven operations into their fight to save Joseph Langer's shattered leg, surgeons at Maryland Shock Trauma Center decided they had tried long enough. A decade ago, they might have been reluctant to quit this soon -- but not now.They told the 37-year-old Pasadena man, who was injured in September when he stopped to help two fallen motorcyclists, that he'd suffer less with a prosthesis than a reconstructed leg that would require years of additional surgery and, perhaps, never stop hurting or support his weight.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 17, 1994
MIAMI -- University of Miami defensive end Rusty Medearis, who risked amputation by returning to the field this season, ended his football career Thursday.Medearis, 23, of Ozark, Mo., who suffered an extensive left knee injury in 1992, was considered the top defensive end in the nation by College and Pro Football Weekly magazine after his sophomore year, the Hurricanes' 1991 national championship season.Said coach Dennis Erickson: "He could have continued to play, but he's the only one who can judge the pain he was going through.
NEWS
By NewHouse News Service | June 7, 2007
The millions spent on the trial could be spent on the people of Sierra Leone, to support the people who suffered. There are people for whom surviving is really hard. The wounds are in our minds." - MUCTARR JALLOH, 29, who moved to New York after enduring atrocities during the 10-year civil war in his native Sierra Leone, including the amputation of his right hand and ear, on the war crimes trial of former Liberian President Charles Taylor, accused of arming and controlling rebels who raped, mutilated and enslaved civilians NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 15, 2012
Over the 14 years since losing her right arm to a hollow-point bullet, Dana Burke was convinced she could feel herself pointing, pinching or waving as she motioned with the 5-inch-long limb the attack left behind. Still, she had to relearn how to pull her hair back in a ponytail and tie her shoes. It's a struggle to play horsie with her three children using only one arm for support, and she had to start off with a child's fat crayon to learn to write left-handed. But now, she has proof of what she knew all along.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | October 24, 2012
A buzz spread among the North Carroll field hockey players as they gathered just inside the gate to their playing field and looked toward the parking lot. "Is she here? Is she coming?" They're all dressed in black shirts with the words "Team Heinle" printed across their backs. Each letter in "Heinle" has a word descending from it - Hope. Enthusiastic. Inspiring. Noble. Love. Extraordinary. All words that apply to Laura Heinle, the North Carroll varsity assistant coach who has coached most of them since they reached the school's junior varsity squad and who is now recovering from bone cancer.
NEWS
By Raven L. Hill, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
A Silver Spring woman has won a $2.35 million malpractice lawsuit against Shady Grove Adventist Hospital in Rockville after a misdiagnosis resulted in the amputation of several fingers, most of her right foot and left leg. Yesenia Rivera, 28, arrived at the hospital's emergency room in shock and complaining of severe abdominal pain on Aug. 3, 2006. She'd been diagnoses with kidney stones two days earlier and sent home, said Julia Arfaa, her attorney. Hospital staff, however, said they believed she had an ectopic pregnancy and did not treat the kidney problem until hours later.
NEWS
By Tracy Wilkinson and Tribune Newspapers | January 17, 2010
Inside a small stucco pavilion built as a urology clinic - one of the few buildings in the hospital complex deemed structurally sound - patient after patient was wheeled into the makeshift operating room on an old bed Saturday. Workers doused the walls with disinfectant as a couple of nurses prepped the wounded and gave them a bit of anesthesia. Then out came the saws. The work was amputations. On the grounds of the heavily damaged General Hospital, injured people, some with crudely severed limbs, moaned or stared vacantly.
FEATURES
By Abigail Tucker and Abigail Tucker,Sun Reporter | April 23, 2008
She would give up her leg. Kathy Bowie knew this even before the specialists at Mercy Medical Center outlined the options. They could fuse her arthritic ankle into place, vastly limiting her ability to ride horses, or amputate below the knee. If she kept the leg, she'd lose so much more: the view from Kennedy's Peak in the Blue Ridge Mountains, where she and her Appaloosa mare could gaze down on the winding Shenandoah and look eagles right in the eye. She'd lose the thrill of seeing cougars flash across the bridle path, and of out-galloping swarms of angry ground bees.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN REPORTER | August 14, 2007
Henry is a three-legged cat who has published two books and answered more than 20,000 personal letters; a feline who, while he may have used up one or two of his own nine lives, has gone on to comfort and inspire thousands of human ones. Not bad for a homeless kitten that, after the ashes of Southern California's 2003 Cedar Fires stopped smoldering, showed up on the doorstep of an unscorched home in the mountain town of Julian and wormed his way into the hearts of a displaced family staying there.
NEWS
May 6, 2004
Homer Avila, 48, a dancer and choreographer who went on to a new career in dance after the amputation of his cancerous right leg and hip, died April 27 in New York from cancer that had spread to his lungs, a friend said. Until the amputation in 2001, Mr. Avila was known best for work with Avila/Weeks Dance, a modern-dance company he directed with Edisa Weeks. He also performed with Twyla Tharp, Mark Morris, Ralph Lemon and the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Mr. Avila's disease was diagnosed as a rare form of cancer called chondrosarcoma, an illness that had gone undetected, he said, because he could not afford health insurance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2006
After spending nearly 20 years lengthening limbs, Dr. Dror Paley decided it was time to organize a fundraiser. Not that the orthopedic surgeon or his workplace, Sinai Hospital's International Center for Limb Lengthening, are without donations. Some patients started giving money nearly two decades ago, which prompted Paley to establish the Save-A-Limb Fund. Other patients organized tennis and golf events. But Paley himself never actively raised money to help fund research and further development for treating children and adults with limb deformities.
NEWS
By NewHouse News Service | June 7, 2007
The millions spent on the trial could be spent on the people of Sierra Leone, to support the people who suffered. There are people for whom surviving is really hard. The wounds are in our minds." - MUCTARR JALLOH, 29, who moved to New York after enduring atrocities during the 10-year civil war in his native Sierra Leone, including the amputation of his right hand and ear, on the war crimes trial of former Liberian President Charles Taylor, accused of arming and controlling rebels who raped, mutilated and enslaved civilians NEWHOUSE NEWS SERVICE
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