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By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | September 27, 2005
Although the Major League Baseball Players Association's new steroids plan isn't as stringent as the one proposed by the commissioner's office, it does add the highly controversial and reportedly oft-used amphetamines to the banned list. The proposal, detailed in a letter by union chief Donald Fehr, also includes lengthening the penalty of a first failed drug test from 10 days to 20 games with the possibility of it being lowered to 10 or increased to 30 depending on an arbiter's findings.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts and The Baltimore Sun | September 21, 2014
Orioles slugger Chris Davis, suspended recently for using a banned stimulant, was caught amid a leaguewide crackdown that began three years ago as players' use of Adderall spiked, according to sports physicians and other experts. Amphetamines — a drug with addictive properties — have long been a part of the game's darker side. Even the home run record-setting Hank Aaron acknowledged using the stimulants, once commonly known as "greenies. " The action by Major League Baseball sheds light on growing concern about amphetamines — a type of drug that has become increasingly potent.
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SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | June 25, 2006
Former Orioles Jim Traber and Mickey Tettleton had just picked up their sons from football camp when the details of Jason Grimsley's affidavit on drugs in baseball crackled over the car radio. As they listened to Grimsley's description of leaded (laced with amphetamines) and unleaded (regular) coffee in major league clubhouses, the old teammates laughed and laughed. "That was giving away a secret of the clubhouse," said Traber, who played parts of four seasons for the Orioles. "But yeah, I knew about it."
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Orioles infielder Chris Davis, Major League Baseball's most prodigious home run hitter last season and an outspoken opponent of performing-enhancing drugs, was suspended for 25 games Friday by the league for testing positive for the drug Adderall. It was his second failed test for an amphetamine in his career. The suspension began Friday before the first-place Orioles' doubleheader against the New York Yankees at Camden Yards and will last beyond the first round of the playoffs, assuming the Orioles make the postseason.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | January 12, 2007
Throughout baseball's raging steroids controversy, San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds has maintained his innocence by offering the same, continual refrain - he gets tested each season and has never failed a drug test. Now, a published report alleges that Bonds, indeed, failed one in 2006, testing positive for amphetamines in the drugs' first year on Major League Baseball's banned substances list. Citing several anonymous sources, the New York Daily News reported yesterday that Bonds, who is also under investigation for possible perjury, tested positive and, as part of his defense, initially told a union official that he had taken the substance from the locker of Giants teammate Mark Sweeney.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 21, 2006
While everybody waits for the remaining names in the Jason Grimsley affidavit to be revealed, the Orioles are trying to proceed as if they aren't all aware that the other shoe is going to land right in the middle of their clubhouse. Three of the blacked-out names in the leaked affidavit clearly are current or former Orioles, based on Grimsley's claim that he had a conversation with three teammates last year about "how they were going to play the baseball season next year when Major League Baseball banned the use of amphetamines and began testing for them."
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE and BILL ORDINE,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
NFL players will face random testing and stiffer penalties for amphetamine use as the result of a change in league policy that now places the drug in the category of performance-enhancers, such as steroids. Previously, the NFL categorized amphetamines as a "substance-abuse drug." Drugs in that group pose personal medical concerns, a league spokesman said, but are usually not considered substances that can give a player an edge on the field. Use of drugs on the performance-enhancer list is scrutinized more closely with league-wide random testing and punishment is swifter.
SPORTS
By THE NEW YORK TIMES | April 22, 2003
NEW YORK - The use of muscle-building drugs and amphetamines remains commonplace in major league baseball, current and former major leaguers say, even as players are being tested for steroids for the first time this season. Far from abandoning performance-enhancing drugs, they say, some players have switched from steroids to drugs like human growth hormone. Some players who say they do not use muscle-building drugs contend that this places them in a difficult position: either join in and use the banned substances or risk losing ground to players who use them in an effort to win the huge contracts that come with hitting the ball farther or throwing it harder.
NEWS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
WASHINGTON - The senator trying to prod baseball into tougher drug testing said yesterday that the newly announced anti-steroid program represents progress but that the sport should also screen for stimulants. The new program - which includes year-round testing for steroid use and a 10-day suspension for a first violation - represents "dramatic and significant progress," said Arizona Republican John McCain, who had threatened to introduce legislation compelling reforms if baseball didn't act voluntarily.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2005
When he joined the Orioles in 1961, Boog Powell would see the pills lying in bowls in the training room, as available as Tootsie Rolls. They were stimulants, known as "greenies," and Powell said yesterday that players would use them sometimes if "you'd have a cold and you didn't feel good, or when you'd get into towns at 4 in the morning and you had a game the next day. It was legal." The big first baseman said he sampled them perhaps a half-dozen times in his 17-year major league career.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2013
Orioles left-hander Troy Patton said he took an Adderall pill four days before this past season ended as a temporary fix to improve focus and then was tested for banned substances the next day. On Friday, Major League Baseball announced that Patton was suspended for 25 games without pay, starting next season, for testing positive for a banned amphetamine. He will be placed on the restricted list for the start of 2014. “I took one because I was stupid,” said Patton, who was 2-0 with a 3.70 ERA in 56 games in 2013.
SPORTS
By David Selig and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
Orioles minor league infielder Ryan Adams has received a 25-game suspension after testing positive for an Amphetamine in violation of Major League Baseball's joint drug prevention and treatment program, MLB announced Friday. The suspension of Adams, who is currently on the roster at Triple-A Norfolk, is effective at the start of next season. Adams had been a member of the Orioles' 40-Man roster at the time the test was administered. The Orioles declined comment on the situation.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | December 14, 2007
Testing policies and penalties for performance-enhancing drugs: MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL At least two annual urine tests administered during and between seasons for anabolic steroids and amphetamines. Positive steroid tests result in a 50-game suspension for a first offense, a 100-game suspension for a second offense and a lifetime ban for a third offense. NFL Urine tests administered randomly during the season or offseason for anabolic steroids and amphetamines. Players must be tested at least once a year.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | August 9, 2007
Barry Bonds has more home runs than anybody else in major league baseball history. If the polls, not to mention our eyes and ears, are correct, not many people (myself included) are finding any joy in that fact today. That can't be helped, not after all that has led up to this moment, as Bonds and his baggage crossed the threshold of the record once held by Henry Aaron. But this also can't be helped: Time is going to prove that we, at this time and in this place, are wrong. Bonds' record will not carry an asterisk, and he will not wear a scarlet letter for eternity.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | May 27, 2007
With all the talking Jason Giambi has done over the years - to grand juries and to full-color newspapers and now to New York Yankees and Major League Baseball officials - you'd think by now he would have also spoken to the notorious Mitchell investigators. Or at least been put on their schedule. That, you'd think, is why the Mitchell folks exist, and this seems to be a fastball down the middle for them. But it hasn't happened yet. Which probably tells you all you need to know about the priorities of all involved.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and Dan Connolly,Sun reporter | January 12, 2007
Throughout baseball's raging steroids controversy, San Francisco Giants slugger Barry Bonds has maintained his innocence by offering the same, continual refrain - he gets tested each season and has never failed a drug test. Now, a published report alleges that Bonds, indeed, failed one in 2006, testing positive for amphetamines in the drugs' first year on Major League Baseball's banned substances list. Citing several anonymous sources, the New York Daily News reported yesterday that Bonds, who is also under investigation for possible perjury, tested positive and, as part of his defense, initially told a union official that he had taken the substance from the locker of Giants teammate Mark Sweeney.
SPORTS
August 30, 1991
Baseball2 Philadelphia Eagles -- Signed DT Jerome Brown.HockeyHartford Whalers -- Signed D Adam Burt to a multiyear contract.F: Richmond Renegades (ECHL) -- Named Dave Allison coach.Track and fieldInternational Amateur Athletic Federation -- Suspended Delisa Floyd, 800 meters runner, for 4 years for testing positive for amphetamines at the World Track and Field Championships.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER | December 14, 2007
Testing policies and penalties for performance-enhancing drugs: MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL At least two annual urine tests administered during and between seasons for anabolic steroids and amphetamines. Positive steroid tests result in a 50-game suspension for a first offense, a 100-game suspension for a second offense and a lifetime ban for a third offense. NFL Urine tests administered randomly during the season or offseason for anabolic steroids and amphetamines. Players must be tested at least once a year.
SPORTS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 3, 2006
The U.S. Attorney's office in San Francisco issued a statement yesterday questioning the accuracy of a Los Angeles Times report published over the weekend. The story identified major league baseball players, including three Orioles, whose names had been blacked out of a steroid investigation affidavit filed earlier this year in federal court. The Times report described a search warrant affidavit signed by an IRS special agent investigating steroid use in professional baseball. The affidavit, based on statements to investigators allegedly made by pitcher Jason Grimsley, implicated a number of his former teammates as users of performance-enhancing drugs.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY and DAN CONNOLLY,SUN REPORTER | July 12, 2006
PITTSBURGH -- Baseball still has work to do to clean up performance-enhancing substances in the game, but its top official staunchly believes his sport is now the toughest on performance-enhancing substances. Commissioner Bud Selig, in his annual luncheon with the Baseball Writers' Association of America, continually championed baseball's revamped drug policy, pointing out that only one player has been suspended this season compared with a dozen in 2005. He also said he is especially proud of this year's agreement between baseball and the players union that bans amphetamines.
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