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By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 29, 2002
DALLAS - Halliburton Co., the world's second-largest provider of oil field services, has settled 30 asbestos cases in New York for an undisclosed amount. The settlement includes cases of mesothelioma and lung cancer, Halliburton said yesterday in a statement. The company received numerous inquiries about those cases at a meeting of analysts and investors in Houston last Wednesday, spokesman Cedric Burgher said. Halliburton shares have tumbled 59 percent in the past year after three asbestos-exposure verdicts totaling $152 million last year sparked concern that such liabilities might push it into bankruptcy, which happened to W.R. Grace & Co. and Kaiser Aluminum Corp.
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SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
In the final seconds of the Morgan State football team's 28-3 thumping of visiting Bowie State (0-2) at Hughes Stadium on Saturday, Lee Hull did his best to avoid what has become a tradition for rookie head coaches: a Gatorade bath. Hull stood on the far end of the Bears (1-2) sideline while the offense marched downfield. He kept his eyes on assistant coaches who tried to distract him while a couple players grabbed the monstrous jug. Eventually, Hull appeared to give in, walking back to the end of the field where the offense was putting the finishing touches on the victory.
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NEWS
August 12, 1995
An article in Thursday's editions listed the wrong amount for Host Marriott Corp.'s debt. The debt as of June 16 was $2.3 billion. The Sun regrets the error.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Gerald Wiseberg makes for an unlikely drug kingpin, but federal authorities say the 81-year-old Korean War veteran helped run an operation that doled out vast amounts of powerful prescription painkillers. Wiseberg and his business partners opened a clinic in Baltimore County in early 2011, soon after the Drug Enforcement Administration raided a similar operation he ran in Florida. Wiseberg's office here attracted droves of former customers from other states, according to a federal indictment that was unsealed Friday charging them with a drug conspiracy.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | March 9, 2003
In 1970, the average amount of sugar each person consumed per year in the United States was 115 pounds. By 1999, that number was 158, an increase of more than 35 percent.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2000
Members of the Maryland Association of Certified Public Accountants are answering readers' tax questions through April 15. See below for how to submit a question. I participate in the Dependent Care Cafeteria Plan with my employer. A certain amount of my money is deducted from my gross earnings to establish a pretax account to pay for day care expenses. The amount that I reserved in this account -- $1,000 -- will not be enough cover the entire amount of day-care expenses that I will incur in 2000, about $2,000.
NEWS
June 12, 1996
Police Hampstead: The owner of J & P Pizza in the 900 block of Main St. told town police that someone broke into the business between 11 p.m. Sunday and 10 a.m. Monday. An undisclosed amount of cash was stolen. Pub Date: 6/12/96
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
Wondering how many tickets were sold to this year's Grand Prix of Baltimore?  Curious as to how the economic benefits of this city-subsidized event compare to last year's inaugural race? Well, you're going to have to just keep wondering.  Race On, the organizers of this year's race, announced yesterday it will not release the number of tickets sold to the three day festival.  Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration, which provided about $800,000 in city services to support the race and spent $7 million last year preparing downtown streets to serve as a race course, is not commissioning a study of the economic impact of this year's race.  Last year's "study confirmed what we know is an undisputed fact and that is the event has a significant positive economic impact," her spokesman Ryan O'Doherty said.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Evening Sun Staff | November 28, 1990
Maryland's court clerks and registers of wills will receive 25 percent pay raises for the next four-year term, the state Board of Public Works decided today.The pay increases will bring salaries for court clerks now earning $45,000 annually to the highest amount allowed under law, $56,250. Those earning $40,000 -- the lowest amount -- will see their salaries rise to $50,000.Salaries for registers of wills will climb from a current top of $45,000 to $56,250, and from a low of $37,500 to $46,875.
BUSINESS
By JULIUS WESTHEIMER | October 13, 1995
STOCKS SELLING FOR the lowest price-earnings ratios will do six times better than ones with the highest P/Es. Three industries fill the bill: Major regional banks, tobacco and department stores."
BUSINESS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2014
The Washington Nationals sought television rights fees nearly three times what the team receives now from the Baltimore Orioles-controlled Mid-Atlantic Sports Network, according to documents unsealed by a New York court last week. The documents were made available by the New York Supreme Court Commercial Division for New York County, which is hearing a dispute over the division of the rights fees the two teams receive from their shared TV network. Both clubs now receive about $40 million a year in return for granting MASN permission to televise their games, but the Nationals were seeking an increase to $118 million, citing recent deals for other teams, according to the documents.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Libber | May 19, 2014
By now, many people are aware that in order to opt out of a smart meter installation, an upfront fee of $75 - payable in three installations starting July 2014 - and an additional $11 to $17 per month will need to be paid, as ordered by the Maryland Public Service Commission (PSC). While my organization, Maryland Smart Meter Awareness (MSMA), is certainly grateful that the PSC decided to grant a permanent opt out, the fees greatly undermine public choice as only those who can afford to pay will be able to opt out. Nevertheless, many people who for reasons of health, privacy or safety, would strongly prefer to keep their analog meter, will be forced to accept a smart meter due to these fees.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 9, 2014
The outrageously bigoted remarks attributed to the owner of the Los Angeles Clippers basketball team mock the positive role black athletes have played in professional sports, even as those sports have served as an exit ramp from poverty. Perhaps the most incredible of Clippers owner Donald Sterling's taped remarks came when his former girlfriend reminded him that he had a whole team made up of black players. His response was: "I support them and give them food and clothes and cars and houses.
NEWS
By Michael B. Runnels | April 9, 2014
Responding to the Obama Administration's decision to delay enforcement of certain provisions of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), a number of politicians and commentators have argued that the president is running roughshod over the U.S. Constitution. To this point, constitutional law professor Jonathan Turley recently argued that such actions are presenting a "troubling mosaic" of executive power, and that "there will come a day when people step back and see the entire mosaic for what it truly represents: a new system with a dominant president with both legislative and executive powers.
NEWS
March 31, 2014
In January, Rick Raemisch was brought shackled and handcuffed to a state penitentiary in Colorado and deposited in a 13-by-17-foot cell with nothing in it except a bed, toilet and sink screwed to the floor. His restraints were removed, the door slammed shut behind him and then he was alone. Mr. Raemisch had committed no crime. He was, in fact, the recently appointed head of Colorado's corrections department, and as he later wrote in a New York Times op-ed, he hoped that by putting himself in an inmate's place he might get "a better sense of what solitary confinement was like, and what it did to the prisoners who were housed there, sometimes for years.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
Possession of small amounts of marijuana would be treated as a civil offense rather than a crime under a bill that passed the Senate Friday. The vote was 36 to 8. The measure now goes to the House of Delegates, where similar legislation last year failed to get out of committee. Under the bill, anyone caught with 10 grams or less of the drug would be issued a civil citation and fined up to $100. Juveniles would be required to appear in court and could be ordered into drug treatment, as could adults receiving their third citation.
NEWS
March 21, 2012
Having read City Councilman Jack Young's article about the problems with water bills, I would like to relate my own experience ("Water bill follies: City deserves better," March 19). In November 2011, I paid $76.27 for 110 days of water usage. This quarter, I received a bill for $76.27 for 92 days of water usage. The most recent bill covered 18 fewer days than the previous one, and there is now one fewer person living in the house than before. I called the Water Department for clarification and was told that no one can pay any less than $76.27.
EXPLORE
October 11, 2011
Editor: Pay attention, folks. We are trashing the world and hurricanes and the ensuing floods are throwing it back at us. Making a wreck of our world is not like making a wreck of our childhood bedrooms; Mother Nature, unlike our own mothers, cannot pick up the garbage we strew and the municipal, county, state and federal services are either unwilling or unable to take care of the mess.  Delighted by the perfect autumn weather this past...
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 12, 2014
The developer of the Harbor Point project will pay the city $400,000 in fees stemming from increased traffic under an agreement approved Wednesday by Baltimore's spending board. Under a second agreement, the city will accept responsibility for maintaining several small parks in the development, though Harbor Point will continue to own the land. City officials, who said the development will create thousands of jobs, described the agreements approved by the Board of Estimates as the latest steps necessary to make the $1.8 billion waterfront project a reality.
NEWS
March 3, 2014
The seizure of the Crimea region of southern Ukraine by Russian troops over the weekend has created the most serious crisis in Europe since Moscow's 2008 incursion into Georgia, which led to the effective dismemberment and annexation of parts of that former Soviet republic. President Barack Obama was right to warn Russian president Vladimir Putin that his country will pay a price for attempting a similar territorial grab in Ukraine, but in order to make that threat credible he must use all the diplomatic tools at his disposal to convince America's European allies to speak with one voice in condemning Russia's dangerous military adventurism and flagrant violation of international norms while avoiding an escalation of the crisis that could lead to armed conflict.
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