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By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | July 24, 2004
The Columbia Association has reversed its decision to deny a local chapter of Amnesty International an information booth at Columbia's 10th annual International Day today. After hearing about a dozen people from Amnesty International and other supportive residents testify at a Columbia Council meeting Thursday, association President Maggie J. Brown decided to grant the group a booth. CA initially turned down the application of Amnesty International, which campaigns worldwide for human rights, claiming it didn't align with the festival's theme of celebrating the planned community's ethnic and cultural diversity.
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NEWS
January 9, 2013
Amnesty International's Frank Jannuzi wrote one of those letters that causes me to ask, "Where do I begin to answer?" ("Time to repeal Maryland's death penalty," Jan. 8). In the second paragraph, he alludes to the fact that imposition of the death penalty is "extremely expensive," and it is; but the question is, why should that be? No matter which method is used to end the life of a heinous criminal, the "means" to accomplish that are actually inexpensive. How much do those chemicals cost, or that burst of electricity?
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - Police are abusing Taser electroshock weapons, routinely inflicting injury, pain and even death in hundreds of cases where using such dangerous force is not necessary, Amnesty International charged yesterday. While these stun guns have been called nonlethal alternative to bullets, a study by the human rights group found that police use the weapons "excessively" and their use is not confined to times where firearms otherwise might be needed. The report said Tasers are used on unarmed suspects in 80 percent of the cases, for verbal noncompliance in 36 percent, and for cases involving "deadly assault" only 3 percent of the time.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2011
Fabienne Doucet is haunted by the stories of the women and children she has met who are still living in camps one year after an earthquake reduced the island nation of Haiti to rubble. There's the former accounting student who apologizes for crying as she describes being gang-raped by four men. There's the young girl who was beaten so brutally she can no longer have children. And there's the mother who was so grateful to receive clothing for her babies that she insisted on washing Doucet's feet.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 8, 2000
PRAGUE, Czech Republic - In an extensive report that has infuriated NATO leaders, Amnesty International said yesterday that NATO violated international law in its bombing war over Yugoslavia by hitting targets where civilians were sure to be killed. The report was released less than a week after Carla del Ponte, the chief prosecutor for the war crimes tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, told the U.N. Security Council that her investigation found no basis for charging NATO or its leaders with war crimes.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 5, 1998
WASHINGTON -- The world's leading human rights group, Amnesty International, is launching its first worldwide campaign aimed at the United States, citing abuses such as "widespread and persistent" police brutality, "endemic" physical and sexual violence against prisoners, "racist" application of the death penalty, and use of "high-tech repression tools" such as electroshock devices and incapacitating chemical sprays.The London-based group kicks off a yearlong USA Campaign with the release tomorrow of a 150-page report highlighting what Amnesty calls an American "double standard" of criticizing human-rights abuses abroad while not doing enough to remedy those at home.
NEWS
January 9, 2013
Amnesty International's Frank Jannuzi wrote one of those letters that causes me to ask, "Where do I begin to answer?" ("Time to repeal Maryland's death penalty," Jan. 8). In the second paragraph, he alludes to the fact that imposition of the death penalty is "extremely expensive," and it is; but the question is, why should that be? No matter which method is used to end the life of a heinous criminal, the "means" to accomplish that are actually inexpensive. How much do those chemicals cost, or that burst of electricity?
NEWS
September 8, 1995
The Annapolis chapter of Amnesty International will hold a candlelight vigil Thursday to honor female victims of human rights abuses.The vigil will begin at 7:30 p.m. at Lawyers Mall at State Circle.Information: 841-5491.
NEWS
May 3, 1994
Dr. Christianna Nichols Leahy, an associate professor of political science, was named the 1994 Distinguished Teacher at Western Maryland College during the annual Senior Investiture and Honors Convocation Sunday.Dr. Leahy, who came to the college in 1984, is known for her volunteer work with Amnesty International, where she is one of 120 experts concerned with human rights records of various nations.Dr. Leahy earned her bachelor's degree from American University and her master's and doctorate in comparative politics from Georgetown University.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | December 18, 1998
LONDON -- In a stunning decision, Britain's highest court unanimously reversed itself yesterday and granted Chile's Gen. Augusto Pinochet a new hearing in his bid to avoid extradition to Spain for alleged human rights crimes.The House of Lords said a judge who had ruled against Pinochet failed to disclose his ties to Amnesty International, one of the groups leading the legal charge against the ex-dictator.The reversal effectively moved the case against Pinochet back to square one, slowed Spain's attempts at extradition and embarrassed Britain's legal establishment.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow , michael.sragow@baltsun.com | December 10, 2009
"The Secret Policeman's Ball" movies play like a "That's Entertainment" of the British counterculture, and they're on glorious display at the AFI Silver this weekend. Their guiding impresario, Martin Lewis, is bringing these films and their exuberant precursors and offshoots to Silver Spring in every possible incarnation, starting with a 40-minute highlights film to be shown for free tonight, followed by the British release versions of "The Secret Policeman's Ball" and "The Secret Policeman's Other Ball."
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Doug Donovan,Sun reporter | November 18, 2007
About 350 Amnesty International members marched outside Baltimore's Supermax prison yesterday to call for an end to Maryland's death penalty. Organizers and speakers at the event praised Gov. Martin O'Malley for publicly supporting efforts to repeal the state's death penalty, a move the General Assembly rejected in March. Folabi K. Olagbaju, director of Amnesty International's Mid-Atlantic regional office, said the group will try again when the legislature meets next year and was encouraged by O'Malley's support.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton and Justin Fenton,sun reporter | November 9, 2006
From a suicidal teenager to a suspected car thief who flees on foot, some people who have refused to cooperate with Harford County police have been getting a wake-up call -- the 50,000-volt variety. The Harford County Sheriff's Office is believed to be among the first police agencies in Maryland to issue Taser stun guns to its deputies, who have used the devices to stop people who flee or refuse to comply with orders, and for the mentally ill who become violent. The agency has been issuing stun guns to patrol deputies since last year, and they have used them on at least 28 occasions since January.
NEWS
By SUSAN GVOZDAS and SUSAN GVOZDAS,Special to the Sun | September 15, 2006
During her 15 months teaching students in rural Mongolia, Katie Church lived in a tent. She had no running water or electricity. She cooked her meals in a makeshift fireplace. She fought winter temperatures that dropped to 40 degrees below zero. Six years later, the St. Mary's High School graduate has returned to Mongolia in hopes of helping substance abusers. Church, who has dedicated her life to public service since graduating from St. Mary's College in 1999, was recently honored by the Southern Maryland school with its first Outstanding Young Alumni award.
NEWS
By Joel Greenberg and Joel Greenberg,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 24, 2006
JERUSALEM -- In a report released yesterday, Amnesty International accused Israel of committing war crimes during its recent campaign against Hezbollah in Lebanon, saying it broke international law by deliberately causing extensive destruction to the country's infrastructure. "Many of the violations examined in this report are war crimes that give rise to individual criminal responsibility," the human rights group said. "They include directly attacking civilian objects and carrying out indiscriminate or disproportionate attacks.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 7, 2006
LONDON --Amnesty International accused the United States and its allies yesterday of widespread abuses in Iraq, including torture and the continued detention of thousands of prisoners without charge or trial. The accusations could fuel the debate over the treatment of detainees that flared after the publication of graphic photographs showing prisoners at Abu Ghraib prison in Baghdad being mistreated by American guards. More recently, British forces in Iraq have been criticized after videotapes showed British soldiers beating Iraqi youths after demonstrations in southern Iraq.
NEWS
October 7, 1991
Martin Ennals, 64, the former secretary-general of Amnesty International who helped build it into a leading human rights group, died Saturday in Saskatoon, Canada, after a yearlong battle with lung cancer. Mr. Ennals led the development of the London-based group as a major international monitor of human rights during his tenure as secretary-general from 1968 to 198. In 1977, he accepted the Nobel Peace Prize on Amnesty's behalf. Born in England, he earned a degree at the London School of Economics in international relations.
NEWS
July 23, 2004
Suddenly on July 19, 2004 ROBERT ROWLAND "BO", of Lewes, DE., formerly of Jarrettsville, MD., father of Penelope Schnick, Lori Schnick and Sarah Carroll, son of Helen Stapleton Schnick and the late Rowland Bernard Schnick, grandfather of Ethan Carroll and former husband of Linda Brown. Services will be held Saturday July 24, at 1:30 P.M. at St. Alban's Anglican Church, Joppa, MD. Friends may call at the Kurtz Funeral Home P.A., 1114 Baldwin Mill Rd., Jarrettsville, Saturday from 11:30 A.M. until 12:30 P.M. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to Amnesty International or A.C.L.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | June 15, 2005
WASHINGTON - That was quite a stretch by an Amnesty International official in branding the prisoner detention camps at Guantanamo Bay "the gulag of our time," considering the millions of deaths meted out by the Stalinist regime during the Cold War. But President Bush's response that the comparison with the Soviet prisons was "absurd" and Defense Secretary Donald H. Rumsfeld's labeling of the word as "reprehensible" have not silenced criticism that human...
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