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By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2010
Question: I have a 7-foot Dracena marginata in my living room. Recently I noticed an ammonia scent coming from the soil. It's sporadic but smelly. Any thoughts? Answer: Sounds like an overwatering issue. Saturated soil decomposes anaerobically (no oxygen is available because the water takes up all the empty soil spaces.) This process stinks — think of a swamp or sewer. Draceneas do need high humidity however. To achieve this, especially during winter months when heating systems tend to dry indoor air, create a moist atmosphere by standing plant pots on trays or saucers of moist pebbles.
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NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2013
Northern District police said that the 3600 block of Falls Road has reopened to traffic after hazmat crews closed the thoroughfare because of an ammonia leak. The Fire Department arrived at the location, in the heart of the Hampden business district, about 7:30 a.m. Saturday. The leak came from a faulty compressor, and fire officials said the tank feeding the compressor had been shut down about noon. By mid-afternoon, businesses were still shut down as authorities ventilated the hazardous gas. No one was injured by the ammonia leak.
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NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
An ammonia leak at an old icehouse in West Baltimore caused an evacuation near the building that suffered an extensive fire in 2004. Homes in the 500 block of N. Pulaski St., less than a block east of the Baltimore American Ice Co. in the 2100 block of W. Franklin St., were evacuated because of the strong odor of ammonia, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a Fire Department spokesman. The 15 evacuees were put on warm MTA buses, Cartwright said. One person complained of breathing problems but refused hospital treatment.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | December 1, 2012
About 200 people were forced out of an Annapolis Junction food production facility after it was determined that ammonia was leaking from a refrigeration unit, Howard County emergency officials said. Firefighters from Howard and Anne Arundel counties, as well as Fort Meade, were called to the Taylor Farms Foodservice building in the 9000 block of Junction Dr. at about 9:40 a.m. Saturday, where they were able to stop the leak, according to Howard County fire spokesman Adam Nolder. Three employees of the company were evaluated by paramedics but refused further treatment.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,Sun Staff Writer | October 5, 1994
Twelve students were treated for minor ailments at area hospitals after an ammonia spill yesterday in a storage area at the Western School of Technology and Environmental Science in Catonsville.The rest of the high school, which has about 700 students, was evacuated and later closed for the day, although the spill was contained in a small area.Ten students were taken by ambulance to Sinai Hospital, where they were treated for eye, ear and nose irritations. All were released by midafternoon, said Sinai spokesman Paul Umansky.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
In its continuing collaboration with Solley-area residents, Constellation Power Source Generation has agreed to use a 30-percent-ammonia liquid that will be trucked through the neighborhood to the Brandon Shores power plant, where it will be used to reduce emissions. The company decided to transport aqueous ammonia in three to five trucks every day, each carrying 5,800 gallons, after meeting with a community group Monday night and figuring in additional concerns from other meetings and discussions with residents.
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | September 27, 2000
In a move seen as hopeful to neighbors, Constellation Power Source Generation officials have agreed to look into installing an emissions reduction system at the Brandon Shores power plant that will not use anhydrous ammonia, a potentially hazardous chemical that would be trucked through the Solley area daily. During a closed mediation session Monday night with Solley-area residents, the Constellation officials said they would give the residents a definite answer at a meeting Oct. 5 on whether the company will use anhydrous ammonia to reduce nitrogen oxide emissions, said Bonnie Johansen, a senior environmental scientist with Constellation.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Lan Nguyen and Alisa Samuels and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writers | April 24, 1992
A faulty hose apparently caused about 300 gallons of ammonia to vaporize and leak from a Laurel ice cream factory last night, resulting in the evacuation of 15 workers and about 60 nearby residents.Jack Sherman, general manager of the East Coast Ice Cream Novelties plant at 9090 Whiskey Bottom Road near U.S. 1, said the leak occurred while the ammonia was being transferred from one storage tank to another. "It was a temporary thing and it probably will not happen again for years and years to come," he said today.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | April 24, 1992
A state environmental crew today was seeking to determine what caused more than 250 gallons of liquid ammonia to leak from a Laurel ice cream factory last night, causing the evacuation of 15 workers and about 60 residents of a nearby trailer park.Workers at the East Coast Ice Cream Novelties plant at 9090 Whiskey Bottom Road near U.S. 1 were evacuated when the leak began about 8:44 p.m., said Battalion Chief Donald R. Howell of the Howard County Fire Department.The plant makes ice cream products for High's convenience stores.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 18, 2000
Neighborhood leaders agreed yesterday to set up a "community working group" with representatives of the Brandon Shores power plant operator in hopes of resolving the controversy over its plans to transport a potentially hazardous material through Solley-area neighborhoods. "We're going to give it a shot," said Lester A. Ettlinger, who has led much of the community protest against the proposal to use anhydrous ammonia - a chemical that can cause severe lung damage and death in extreme exposure - in its new anti-pollution system.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 7, 2010
Question: I have a 7-foot Dracena marginata in my living room. Recently I noticed an ammonia scent coming from the soil. It's sporadic but smelly. Any thoughts? Answer: Sounds like an overwatering issue. Saturated soil decomposes anaerobically (no oxygen is available because the water takes up all the empty soil spaces.) This process stinks — think of a swamp or sewer. Draceneas do need high humidity however. To achieve this, especially during winter months when heating systems tend to dry indoor air, create a moist atmosphere by standing plant pots on trays or saucers of moist pebbles.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella | February 18, 2009
TIP 37 Save on cleaning supplies by making your own The ingredients are probably all right there in your kitchen or bath cabinets - baking soda, ammonia, vinegar, rubbing alcohol. Know what to mix with what and you could make your own household cleaners and save money at the grocery or drugstore. Be careful and make sure you follow all the directions to be safe. Instead of paying extra for Pine Sol, Windex or Tilex, make your own floor, window and tile cleaners, suggests Web site www.creativehomemaking.
NEWS
December 16, 2008
The Environmental Protection Agency's end-of-year decision to exempt farmers from reporting the amount of ammonia emitted from animal waste doesn't pass the smell test. While this would benefit those in Maryland's poultry industry, which is based on the Eastern Shore and raised 295 million chickens last year, the ruling isn't welcome news for their neighbors, environmentalists and others citizens. The EPA's rule change exempts animal farm operations from having to report ammonia and other emissions under "right to know" requirements of federal emergency response laws.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 13, 2008
Brushing aside concerns raised by environmental groups, the Bush administration exempted most poultry farms yesterday from reporting releases of ammonia and other hazardous substances from the waste their flocks produce. The Environmental Protection Agency backed away from the blanket exemption it had originally proposed, saying the largest livestock farms will still have to report releases of potentially harmful gases - but only to emergency response planners, not environmental regulators.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,tim.wheeler@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
In its final days, the Bush administration is poised to exempt poultry farms from reporting how much ammonia and other noxious pollutants they are releasing into the air from the millions of tons of manure their flocks generate. The Environmental Protection Agency has asked the federal Office of Management and Budget to give final approval to a rule that would exclude poultry farms from environmental reporting required of other industries. The budget office reviews all proposed federal regulations to see that their benefits justify their costs.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | March 8, 2008
The ammonia spill that hit a West Baltimore neighborhood Thursday night was legitimate, but rumors - not noxious fumes - touched off the panic that engulfed an elementary school hours later, fire officials said. The Thursday night spill occurred when workers at a shuttered ice-making factory accidentally ruptured a tube containing ammonia gas. Scores of residents were evacuated from homes, and there were complications for commuters yesterday morning because of the incident. One person was hospitalized as fire crews worked overnight to clean up the scene, before allowing residents to return to their homes.
NEWS
By Stephanie Hanes and Stephanie Hanes,SUN STAFF | August 2, 2000
Leaders in the battle against the Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. proposal to truck a potentially hazardous chemical daily into the Brandon Shores power complex said dozens of residents plan to attend a meeting tonight to question County Executive Janet S. Owens on the growing controversy. Owens was on vacation during the first weeks of the dispute between Solley-area residents and the power giant, and she has not taken a stance on the issue. But the county executive has said she understands residents' fears about BGE's plans to use anhydrous ammonia - a common industrial chemical that can cause severe lung damage and death in cases of extreme exposure - in a new anti-pollution system.
NEWS
August 1, 2000
THE LARGEST anhydrous ammonia spill in the nation's history merited only a three-paragraph brief in The Sun, although the 1991 accident occurred at the former Heileman brewery in Baltimore County. Why so little space? It wasn't a big deal. Nobody was evacuated, nobody died and nobody was injured. Chris Hawley, the Baltimore County Fire Department's hazardous materials coordinator, recalls that the gas quickly dissipated into the air, never causing a stir in residential communities near the brewery.
NEWS
By Richard Irwin and Richard Irwin,Sun reporter | March 7, 2008
An ammonia leak at an old icehouse in West Baltimore caused an evacuation near the building that suffered an extensive fire in 2004. Homes in the 500 block of N. Pulaski St., less than a block east of the Baltimore American Ice Co. in the 2100 block of W. Franklin St., were evacuated because of the strong odor of ammonia, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a Fire Department spokesman. The 15 evacuees were put on warm MTA buses, Cartwright said. One person complained of breathing problems but refused hospital treatment.
NEWS
October 12, 2006
It's not often that we hear studies in the poultry industry described as revolutionary, as a Maryland university professor put it the other day. Average consumers care little more about chickens than that the ones they buy at the market or roadside barbeque be fresh and cheap. We have so many other pressing daily cares that, well, what happens in chicken houses stays in chicken houses. That's technically not true - just ask any environmentalist or chicken-farm neighbor - and that's why the University of Maryland Eastern Shore's $3.3 million project to redesign the physical structures where broilers are raised may very well produce revolutionary results.
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