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NEWS
March 30, 2001
THE FIRST Arab League summit in a decade, at Amman, Jordan, was a triumph for being held. The winner was the host, King Abdullah II, for getting everyone there. That said, the summit was a failure, unable to bridge the chasm between Iraq and the country it invaded in 1990, Kuwait, and the one it threatened, Saudi Arabia. They still rely on the United States for protection against dictator Saddam Hussein that they cannot obtain from Arab brothers. Although most Arabs want to end United Nations sanctions against Iraq, manipulated by Saddam Hussein to impoverish the people, he would not make sufficient amends to Kuwait.
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NEWS
By Jumana Al-Tamimi | November 20, 2006
When a friend half-jokingly told me, "When I hear the Jordanian accent in Amman, I feel happy," it was another way of conveying her dismay at the prevalence of the Iraqi accent in the Jordanian capital. Iraqis are obvious and everywhere in Jordan: in caf?s, hotels, shopping centers, grocery stores and apartments. Luxury cars with Iraqi plates fill the streets, while restaurants offering tashreeb (the Iraqi dish of chicken or beef with bread soaked in the meat juices) serve patrons nightly in Amman.
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NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 9, 1999
AMMAN, Jordan -- In death, King Hussein of Jordan brought together the heroes and the villains of his ultimate ambition to make this a peaceful region.They all came to his funeral yesterday. The peacemakers and the troublemakers. The optimists and the naysayers. Men who had wished him dead long ago. Others his armies had fought in war.American presidents and Iraqi diplomats, Arab leaders and Israeli prime ministers, former guerrilla fighters and retired generals, Europeans and those they once ruled assembled at a royal palace to pay their respects to the 63-year-old king who died Sunday of cancer.
NEWS
By JUSTIN MARTIN | April 23, 2006
AMMAN, JORDAN -- For the last seven months, I've been living in Jordan, where, after a brief vacation to Budapest and Istanbul, I recently returned. As my ears popped and the midnight plane descended toward the lights of the Jordanian capital, I experienced the common, calming sentiment all travelers feel when they reach home. Somewhat weary from living out of suitcases, I was looking forward to putting down my bags and resting my feet in my apartment. Jordan had become my home. Little-known by Westerners and many Europeans, Jordan is known throughout the Middle East for its unwavering hospitality, and this spirit of inclusion has allowed me to build a life here.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 15, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- The tall, gaunt man sat nervously fingering a rosary in the Baghdad airport, waiting for what he feared would be the last flight out before war.Beside him was a small, worn canvas bag with all that he owned. And two scuffed squash rackets.He had not chosen this last moment to leave Baghdad, he said hesitantly. His British accent barely audible, he explained he could not go earlier. He was in jail.He was the last Western hostage to leave Iraq.Patrick Trigg was held for 120 days of solitary confinement and interrogation after he was caught trying to escape across the border.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | January 18, 2005
AMMAN, Jordan -- This hilly Jordanian capital has become Baghdad West, where hundreds of thousands of Iraqis have taken refuge. Many are rich Sunni supporters of Saddam Hussein who know they have no future in Iraq. Sixty percent of real estate sold in Amman last year is said to have been bought by Iraqis. Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi came here to try to entice prominent Sunni Iraqis-in-exile to abandon their community's widespread boycott of Iraq's elections. He failed. In Amman, a visitor quickly senses the tensions that threaten to tear Iraq apart.
NEWS
November 11, 2005
Try as they have in recent years, al-Qaida affiliates had failed to execute successful suicide attacks in the Hashemite kingdom. Jordan's intelligence and security services, among the best in the region, had always managed to foil the plots - until Wednesday, when Islamic militants finally hit their mark with bombings at three Western-operated hotels in Amman. Like Sharm el-Sheik, London and Madrid, the Jordanian capital was targeted because of its government's help in the U.S.-led Iraq war. Just as in those cities, the majority of the dead in Amman were civilians and locals, including guests at a wedding.
NEWS
By COX NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2002
AMMAN, Jordan - Jordanian officials announced yesterday that two members of the al-Qaida terrorist network have confessed to the killing of an American diplomat in Amman in October. Information Minister Mohammad Adwan said in a telephone interview that Salem Saad bin Suweid, a Libyan, and Yasser Fatih Ibrahim, a Jordanian, had confessed to the killing of Laurence Foley on Oct. 28. "They definitely confessed to being in Osama bin Laden's al-Qaida," Adwan said. Al-Qaida and its leader, bin Laden, are blamed for the Sept.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 13, 2005
AMMAN, JORDAN -- Confirming widespread suspicions, investigators have concluded that the deadly suicide bombings that struck three hotels in Jordan's capital last week were the work of foreigners loyal to Islamic militant Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a Jordanian official said yesterday. Deputy Prime Minister Marwan Muasher announced that police had identified the three bombers who killed 57 people Wednesday night in near-simultaneous attacks on the Grand Hyatt, Days Inn and Radisson SAS hotels.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 27, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- Thousands of stranded war refugees took shelter in cars and buses for the fourth day in a row yesterday, when neither the Jordanian government nor the chill of a desert snowfall could persuade Iraq to let them cross the border.Jordanian officials did manage to deliver an emergency supply of blankets, food and gasoline to the impromptu Iraqi village, whose population has swelled to about 5,000, according to U.N.officials. Officials also said that a temporary shelter has been set up to accommodate some of the refugees on the Iraqi side.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | April 20, 2006
JERUSALEM --In the most recent political headache for Hamas, Jordan said yesterday that it had uncovered a cache of Hamas weapons and postponed a visit by the Palestinian foreign minister, Mahmoud Zahar, who is also a senior Hamas leader. Hamas denied the accusation and said it regretted the Jordanian decision to delay the talks. A Jordanian government spokesman, Nasser Joudeh, told the Petra news agency that the Hamas weapons cache, which was found at an undisclosed site in Jordan, included rocket launchers, explosives and automatic weapons.
NEWS
By ASHRAF KHALIL and ASHRAF KHALIL,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 14, 2005
AMMAN, JORDAN -- An Iraqi woman appeared on Jordanian state television yesterday and confessed to being the fourth member of an al-Qaida suicide bomber team that attacked three hotels in Amman last week, killing 57 people. The woman calmly identified herself as Sajida Mubarak Atrous al-Rishawi, 35, a native of the insurgent stronghold of Ramadi. The footage showed her standing and turning to display what was described as a deactivated explosive belt wrapped around her body. Jordanian officials said she had been captured yesterday in Amman.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 13, 2005
AMMAN, JORDAN -- Confirming widespread suspicions, investigators have concluded that the deadly suicide bombings that struck three hotels in Jordan's capital last week were the work of foreigners loyal to Islamic militant Abu Musab al-Zarqawi, a Jordanian official said yesterday. Deputy Prime Minister Marwan Muasher announced that police had identified the three bombers who killed 57 people Wednesday night in near-simultaneous attacks on the Grand Hyatt, Days Inn and Radisson SAS hotels.
NEWS
November 11, 2005
Try as they have in recent years, al-Qaida affiliates had failed to execute successful suicide attacks in the Hashemite kingdom. Jordan's intelligence and security services, among the best in the region, had always managed to foil the plots - until Wednesday, when Islamic militants finally hit their mark with bombings at three Western-operated hotels in Amman. Like Sharm el-Sheik, London and Madrid, the Jordanian capital was targeted because of its government's help in the U.S.-led Iraq war. Just as in those cities, the majority of the dead in Amman were civilians and locals, including guests at a wedding.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 28, 2005
AMMAN, Jordan - The economic sanctions imposed on Iraq before the fall of Saddam Hussein may have been the best of times for neighboring Jordan. Truckloads of goods, from baby food to building materials, legal and illegal, streamed across the barren border. In return, Jordan reaped the benefits of cheap Iraqi oil. The postwar scene looks drastically different. Trucks entering Iraq are still filled with merchandise, but with trade restrictions lifted, the products are by and large American and European.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | January 18, 2005
AMMAN, Jordan -- This hilly Jordanian capital has become Baghdad West, where hundreds of thousands of Iraqis have taken refuge. Many are rich Sunni supporters of Saddam Hussein who know they have no future in Iraq. Sixty percent of real estate sold in Amman last year is said to have been bought by Iraqis. Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi came here to try to entice prominent Sunni Iraqis-in-exile to abandon their community's widespread boycott of Iraq's elections. He failed. In Amman, a visitor quickly senses the tensions that threaten to tear Iraq apart.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
AMMAN, Jordan -- Deportation is watching your son' marriage on videotape months after the event. It is being helpless to go to your mother as she grows old and feeble. It is missing your father's funeral and having grandchildren who are strangers.It is having a house, and land, and friends you have not seen in 19 years.This is the pain of exile for Abdul Jawad Saleh, a Palestinian deported by Israel in 1973. When he heard of the expulsion of 415 Palestinians last month, the anger returned.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Sun Staff Correspondent | February 6, 1991
AMMAN, Jordan -- With the toll of bombed Jordanian oil trucks rising daily on the western plains of Iraq, relations between the United States and Jordan have reached their all-time low, this country's chief government spokesman said yesterday."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 16, 2003
AMMAN, Jordan - The restaurant called Whispers offers a slice of Americana, from cheeseburgers to chocolate shakes, and is where several Jordanians who studied or worked in the United States were talking yesterday about what seemed an abrupt change in American values. "The Middle East used to have rules," Khaled Asfour, 37, a lawyer who studied in the United States, said over a heaping plate of onion rings. "Now, it's whatever America wants. No country is safe anymore." Thanks to the war against Iraq and pointed criticism of Syria, the Bush administration has increased anxiety here that the region is the victim of what some Arabs call American colonialism.
NEWS
By Megan K. Stack and Megan K. Stack,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2003
AMMAN, Jordan - The men came scrambling through the streets, clutching kerosene lanterns, bedrolls, a few days of food. They reached the bus, heaved their baggage into the underbelly and clambered aboard as if it were the last ride out of town. There was a tailor who had worked all night at a pants factory; a lone woman who stared out the window from the depths of her black veil; a cook who after days of argument managed to wrangle his passport from his boss' grip. The Iraqis were bound for home.
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