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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Baltimore's beleaguered Edgar Allan Poe House will be shutting its doors Friday, with plans to reopen in 2013 under the auspices of a nonprofit group hoping to increase attendance and make the city landmark self-sufficient. The house, which normally closes for the winter in December, could reopen as early as next spring, said Thomas Stosur, director of the city's Department of Planning. Plans for the site are still being formulated by the nonprofit Poe Baltimore, which will oversee the house and work to increase its visibility and viability.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
"You might call him 'The Leader of the Cult of the Unusual' " - Jules Verne Edgar Allan Poe, whose creepy tales of terror continue to thrill new generations of readers, lived in a crowded household from 1832 to 1835 at what is now 203 N. Amity St. Poe, who was born 205 years ago Sunday, had lived in Baltimore on Mechanics Row on Wilks Street, east of the Jones Falls, in 1829. The next year he entered West Point but was dismissed a year later. Poe returned to Baltimore and moved into the 21/2-story brick rowhouse with green shutters that was built around 1830 for Charles Klassen in a rural area that then marked the western edge of the city.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 12, 2000
SOMEONE PUT Teddy Angel on the steps of the burned-out rowhouse, and I recognized it instantly because it's identical to the stuffed animal my daughter's generous and collectibles-savvy aunt from Columbia gave her a few Christmases ago. I found Teddy Angel yesterday morning among a few dozen toys and stuffed animals that kids in the neighborhood had placed on the steps of the rowhouse on North Amity Street in West Baltimore. The rowhouse is in a strip of poverty just a few blocks west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, a block south of Edgar Allan Poe's house, within eyeshot of the B&O Railroad Museum.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2012
Baltimore's beleaguered Edgar Allan Poe House will be shutting its doors Friday, with plans to reopen in 2013 under the auspices of a nonprofit group hoping to increase attendance and make the city landmark self-sufficient. The house, which normally closes for the winter in December, could reopen as early as next spring, said Thomas Stosur, director of the city's Department of Planning. Plans for the site are still being formulated by the nonprofit Poe Baltimore, which will oversee the house and work to increase its visibility and viability.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2002
A West Baltimore woman, whose mother and four of her five children died in a rowhouse fire two years ago caused by a fallen candle that they had relied on for light, sued Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. yesterday for failing to provide electricity. In her $315 million lawsuit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Latasha McCray seeks to hold BGE liable for the fire because the company rejected several requests to restore electricity to her 129 N. Amity St. rowhouse. McCray also accuses BGE of trying to defraud her by seeking payment of unpaid bills belonging to previous residents and others before restoring service.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
Fans get their final say beginning today on what Baltimore's NF team should be called by voting via a Sundial poll.The team will announce its new name in a news conference at Harborplace at noon tomorrow, the 12th anniversary of the Colts' move from Baltimore to Indianapolis.As the decision is being made, here's a look at the background behind the three finalists -- Americans, Marauders and Ravens.Writer Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston and considered himself a Virginian. He published "The Raven" in New York while living in Philadelphia and spent only a few years in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2000
The city had a plan to seek out and help all of its residents living without power - but it never found Rachel Dorsey. The 75-year-old West Baltimore woman died in a fire Sunday at her North Monroe Street home, which had been without electricity since June 1999. The blaze, which is under investigation, recalls a June 10 fire on Amity Street that claimed the life of a woman and four of her grandchildren who were using a candle in the absence of electricity. After that fatal fire, the city developed a plan with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to offer assistance to residents without power.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
For a guy who's been dead some 160 years, Edgar Allan Poe's not getting much rest. A team of ghost hunters from the Wilkes-Barre, Pa.-based TV program "Ghost Detectives" will be spending this weekend at the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum and at Fells Point's Admiral Fell Inn, looking for signs of paranormal activity — hopefully by the ghost of Poe himself. "The Poe House has always intrigued us," said Steven Barry, one of the show's investigators. Paranormal investigators are constantly asking for permission to spend a night at the Poe House, curator Jeff Jerome said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Native Londoner Kimberly Marie Freeman lives and works 200 miles north of Baltimore, but she's enthusiastically joining the effort to save one of the city's cultural treasures. Shutting the Edgar Allan Poe House, she says with a hint of exasperation, would be a shabby way to treat such an internationally renowned figure. "There would be outrage in England if anyone ever considered shutting down Shakespeare's home," said Freeman, artistic director for New York-based Bedlam Ensemble, a performance group putting on several shows in Manhattan this month and next to raise money for the beleaguered museum.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
"You might call him 'The Leader of the Cult of the Unusual' " - Jules Verne Edgar Allan Poe, whose creepy tales of terror continue to thrill new generations of readers, lived in a crowded household from 1832 to 1835 at what is now 203 N. Amity St. Poe, who was born 205 years ago Sunday, had lived in Baltimore on Mechanics Row on Wilks Street, east of the Jones Falls, in 1829. The next year he entered West Point but was dismissed a year later. Poe returned to Baltimore and moved into the 21/2-story brick rowhouse with green shutters that was built around 1830 for Charles Klassen in a rural area that then marked the western edge of the city.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2012
For a guy who's been dead some 160 years, Edgar Allan Poe's not getting much rest. A team of ghost hunters from the Wilkes-Barre, Pa.-based TV program "Ghost Detectives" will be spending this weekend at the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum and at Fells Point's Admiral Fell Inn, looking for signs of paranormal activity — hopefully by the ghost of Poe himself. "The Poe House has always intrigued us," said Steven Barry, one of the show's investigators. Paranormal investigators are constantly asking for permission to spend a night at the Poe House, curator Jeff Jerome said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2011
Native Londoner Kimberly Marie Freeman lives and works 200 miles north of Baltimore, but she's enthusiastically joining the effort to save one of the city's cultural treasures. Shutting the Edgar Allan Poe House, she says with a hint of exasperation, would be a shabby way to treat such an internationally renowned figure. "There would be outrage in England if anyone ever considered shutting down Shakespeare's home," said Freeman, artistic director for New York-based Bedlam Ensemble, a performance group putting on several shows in Manhattan this month and next to raise money for the beleaguered museum.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 11, 2002
A West Baltimore woman, whose mother and four of her five children died in a rowhouse fire two years ago caused by a fallen candle that they had relied on for light, sued Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. yesterday for failing to provide electricity. In her $315 million lawsuit filed in Baltimore Circuit Court, Latasha McCray seeks to hold BGE liable for the fire because the company rejected several requests to restore electricity to her 129 N. Amity St. rowhouse. McCray also accuses BGE of trying to defraud her by seeking payment of unpaid bills belonging to previous residents and others before restoring service.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2000
The city had a plan to seek out and help all of its residents living without power - but it never found Rachel Dorsey. The 75-year-old West Baltimore woman died in a fire Sunday at her North Monroe Street home, which had been without electricity since June 1999. The blaze, which is under investigation, recalls a June 10 fire on Amity Street that claimed the life of a woman and four of her grandchildren who were using a candle in the absence of electricity. After that fatal fire, the city developed a plan with Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. to offer assistance to residents without power.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | June 12, 2000
SOMEONE PUT Teddy Angel on the steps of the burned-out rowhouse, and I recognized it instantly because it's identical to the stuffed animal my daughter's generous and collectibles-savvy aunt from Columbia gave her a few Christmases ago. I found Teddy Angel yesterday morning among a few dozen toys and stuffed animals that kids in the neighborhood had placed on the steps of the rowhouse on North Amity Street in West Baltimore. The rowhouse is in a strip of poverty just a few blocks west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, a block south of Edgar Allan Poe's house, within eyeshot of the B&O Railroad Museum.
SPORTS
By Jon Morgan and Jon Morgan,SUN STAFF | March 28, 1996
Fans get their final say beginning today on what Baltimore's NF team should be called by voting via a Sundial poll.The team will announce its new name in a news conference at Harborplace at noon tomorrow, the 12th anniversary of the Colts' move from Baltimore to Indianapolis.As the decision is being made, here's a look at the background behind the three finalists -- Americans, Marauders and Ravens.Writer Edgar Allan Poe was born in Boston and considered himself a Virginian. He published "The Raven" in New York while living in Philadelphia and spent only a few years in Baltimore.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 10, 2004
An unidentified man was fatally shot last night less than a block from the B&O Railroad Museum in Baltimore, police said. About 8 p.m., the victim was seen running from a gunman in the 900 block of Lemmon St. He turned onto Amity Street within sight of the museum, then into an alley behind Mahogany Inc. at 910 W. Lombard St., where he was shot twice and killed, said Detective Joe Jefferson. Anyone with information about the killing was urged to call Jefferson or Detective John Riddick at 410-396-2100.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Laurie Willis and Peter Hermann and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | June 13, 2000
Baltimore prosecutors and housing officials are searching for the owner of the Amity Street rowhouse that was without power when four people died in a fire Saturday, and said yesterday they are investigating his jumble of properties. To prevent such tragedies, representatives from City Hall and Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. began a series of meetings last night to quickly identify and get aid to homeowners struggling to pay utility bills. "There is no excuse for any home in this city to be without electricity," said Zack Germroth, a housing authority spokesman who said his agency will try to survey each home in the city to determine who is with and without power.
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