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FEATURES
September 6, 1998
"I read a book called 'An Amish Christmas,' by Richard Ammon. I like this book not because it is about Christmas but because it is about Amish people. The book tells all about how Amish people celebrate Christmas for two whole days. It explains Amish customs. For example, the men all sit on one side of the dinner table and the women all sit on the other side. The illustrations by Pamela Patrick are beautiful."- Kerry C. Lancaster,Jarrettsville Elementary"The book 'Where the Sidewalk Ends' by Shel Silverstein is a great book.
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NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
LANCASTER, Pa. -On a recent morning they knocked on Mary Ann Stoltzfus' door, the research nurse and her Amish helper, just as they have on so many doors over the years. They didn't call ahead - most Amish don't have telephones. They tracked down Stoltzfus the old-fashioned way: They asked her mother-in-law for the address when they ran into her. There were consent forms to sign, nosy medical questions to ask. The pair turned Stoltzfus' kitchen into a makeshift doctor's office, where nurse Theresa Roomet drew five vials of blood as the 40-year-old mother of six rested her elbow on the lacy tablecloth.
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NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | February 15, 1993
The same Amish businessman who opened the farmers market at Crossroads Square Shopping Center in Westminster last year is planning to try the idea in Harford County.The Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers Market, scheduled to open early next month in a former grocery store at Jamesway Plaza on West Bel Air Avenue near Beards Hill Road in Aberdeen, will boast 60 to 70 stands on Fridays and Saturdays.Craftsmen, farmers and food servers will pay $75 for each 8-by-8 1/2 -foot stand to sell handmade furniture, crafts, baked goods, cheese, smoked meats, canned foods, hot food and produce.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 21, 2002
BIRD-IN-HAND, Pa. - They started with a prayer, closed with "Amazing Grace," and in between feasted on a procession of Katie Fisher's specialties - apricot applesauce, baked chicken, smoked turkey ham, homemade noodles, fresh blueberry pie. The 10 guests, mostly tourists, had gathered around the long table overlooking cornfields and a herd of grazing cows to experience something beyond the well-advertised quilt shops and buggy rides of Lancaster County:...
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | February 14, 1993
Shoppers who now must drive an hour to get to Amish markets and crafts soon will find them much closer when an Amish businessman opens a Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers Market in Aberdeen.The market, scheduled to open early next month in a former grocery store at Jamesway Plaza on West Bel Air Avenue near Beards Hill Road, will boast 60 to 70 stands on Fridays and Saturdays.Craftsmen, farmers and food servers will pay $75 for each 8-by-8 1/2 -foot stand to sell handmade furniture, crafts, baked goods, cheese, smoked meats, canned foods, hot food and produce.
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
LANCASTER, Pa. -- From a distance, the landscape is a romance of rolling hills dotted with silos and the sweet scent of honeysuckle.In closer, drowsy little towns come into view with Amish horse-drawn buggies joggling down pastoral roads amid knee-high cornfields.But at point-blank range, the picture is marred by a little sign on a storefront window: "MEGA STORES DESTROY SMALL TOWNS."Wal-Mart is coming.Here, as the nation's largest retailer plans to build four 24-hour-a-day supercenters and a discount club, a feud is playing out.Galvanized, anti-Wal-Mart citizen militias called "Save Our Small Town Way of Life" and "Up Against the Wal" have sprung up with office space, attorneys and petition drives.
NEWS
By Marego Athans and Marego Athans,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 21, 2002
BIRD-IN-HAND, Pa. - They started with a prayer, closed with "Amazing Grace," and in between feasted on a procession of Katie Fisher's specialties - apricot applesauce, baked chicken, smoked turkey ham, homemade noodles, fresh blueberry pie. The 10 guests, mostly tourists, had gathered around the long table overlooking cornfields and a herd of grazing cows to experience something beyond the well-advertised quilt shops and buggy rides of Lancaster County:...
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com | April 5, 2009
LANCASTER, Pa. -On a recent morning they knocked on Mary Ann Stoltzfus' door, the research nurse and her Amish helper, just as they have on so many doors over the years. They didn't call ahead - most Amish don't have telephones. They tracked down Stoltzfus the old-fashioned way: They asked her mother-in-law for the address when they ran into her. There were consent forms to sign, nosy medical questions to ask. The pair turned Stoltzfus' kitchen into a makeshift doctor's office, where nurse Theresa Roomet drew five vials of blood as the 40-year-old mother of six rested her elbow on the lacy tablecloth.
ENTERTAINMENT
By: Katie Hutchinson | June 22, 2012
Was the season premiere of "Snooki And JWOWW" everything you thought it would be? It was all worth it to see Jenni "JWOWW" Farley's "O-face," wouldn't you say? There is nothing quite like the shocked/horrified/speechless reaction of your best gal pal when you tell her that you are officially knocked up, and your party days are over. Or, as Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi explained her predicament simply, "Instead of life throwing me a curve ball, it threw me a sperm ball. " Obviously this wasn't a shock to the rest of the world, because Twitter, Facebook, daily news, tabloids, and hell, probably even the five people still on MySpace were buzzing the day Snooki announced she was pregnant with a little guido or guidette.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 17, 1993
FREDERICKSBURG, Ohio -- A river of black horse-drawn buggies flowed over the hills near here in a funeral procession that stretched to another time -- when America was younger and the automobile for most was only a dream or a nightmare.Five Amish children, who were killed last week when they were struck by a car on a country road, were buried yesterday in one of the largest gatherings of the Amish in recent years.All weekend, hundreds of Amish people poured into this town of 500 residents some 60 miles south of Cleveland, where there are almost as many hitching posts as parking spaces.
FEATURES
September 6, 1998
"I read a book called 'An Amish Christmas,' by Richard Ammon. I like this book not because it is about Christmas but because it is about Amish people. The book tells all about how Amish people celebrate Christmas for two whole days. It explains Amish customs. For example, the men all sit on one side of the dinner table and the women all sit on the other side. The illustrations by Pamela Patrick are beautiful."- Kerry C. Lancaster,Jarrettsville Elementary"The book 'Where the Sidewalk Ends' by Shel Silverstein is a great book.
NEWS
By Alec Matthew Klein and Alec Matthew Klein,Sun Staff Writer | July 9, 1995
LANCASTER, Pa. -- From a distance, the landscape is a romance of rolling hills dotted with silos and the sweet scent of honeysuckle.In closer, drowsy little towns come into view with Amish horse-drawn buggies joggling down pastoral roads amid knee-high cornfields.But at point-blank range, the picture is marred by a little sign on a storefront window: "MEGA STORES DESTROY SMALL TOWNS."Wal-Mart is coming.Here, as the nation's largest retailer plans to build four 24-hour-a-day supercenters and a discount club, a feud is playing out.Galvanized, anti-Wal-Mart citizen militias called "Save Our Small Town Way of Life" and "Up Against the Wal" have sprung up with office space, attorneys and petition drives.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | February 15, 1993
The same Amish businessman who opened the farmers market at Crossroads Square Shopping Center in Westminster last year is planning to try the idea in Harford County.The Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers Market, scheduled to open early next month in a former grocery store at Jamesway Plaza on West Bel Air Avenue near Beards Hill Road in Aberdeen, will boast 60 to 70 stands on Fridays and Saturdays.Craftsmen, farmers and food servers will pay $75 for each 8-by-8 1/2 -foot stand to sell handmade furniture, crafts, baked goods, cheese, smoked meats, canned foods, hot food and produce.
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | February 14, 1993
Shoppers who now must drive an hour to get to Amish markets and crafts soon will find them much closer when an Amish businessman opens a Pennsylvania Dutch Farmers Market in Aberdeen.The market, scheduled to open early next month in a former grocery store at Jamesway Plaza on West Bel Air Avenue near Beards Hill Road, will boast 60 to 70 stands on Fridays and Saturdays.Craftsmen, farmers and food servers will pay $75 for each 8-by-8 1/2 -foot stand to sell handmade furniture, crafts, baked goods, cheese, smoked meats, canned foods, hot food and produce.
NEWS
October 9, 2006
Immigrants can ease the financial crunch Hidden on Page 2D in Thursday's Business section was an article titled "Bernanke depicts dire future" (Oct. 5) that should have been on the front page of the paper. The article explained that Federal Reserve Chairman Ben S. Bernanke had noted that "projected funding shortfalls for Social Security and Medicare threaten large and unavoidable fiscal consequences" in speaking to the Economic Club of Washington. This situation is bound to happen, he continued, as the baby boomers begin to withdraw retirement money next year because the country now has an insufficient number of younger workers to "fund promised benefits."
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,Sun reporter | May 18, 2007
MECHANICSVILLE -- Down a curvy road and past square fields, gray barns, still plows and grazing cows, a visitor will eventually arrive at Andrew Stoltzfus' workshop. This is Amish country -- the horse and buggy out back are a dead giveaway -- yet there, in the middle of his shop's rusty metal roof, sits a tiny nod to contemporary society. A solar panel. Stoltzfus is an Amish traditionalist.
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