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Amiri Baraka

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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
Artist and poet Amiri Baraka, formerly known as Leroi Jones, will read from his work at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Maryland Institute, College of Art's Mount Royal Station Auditorium.One of the more influential African-American artists of the 20th century, Mr. Baraka has directed several community arts programs, such as the Black Arts Repertory Theatre-School in Harlem, and has written many books of poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction.He will speak as part of the Institute's "Spectrum of Poetic Fire" poetry series organized by faculty member and poet Joe Cardarelli.
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NEWS
March 26, 2003
Baraka employs the resources of his tradition On March 15, The Sun's article "Literary warrior uses poetry as a weapon" presented fair and balanced coverage of the controversy surrounding Amiri Baraka's poem "Somebody Blew Up America." I find it disturbing, however, that Gregory Kane's column "Black liberals need to respond to insult of Rice by Baraka" (March 19) suggests that members of the state government should have censured the remarks of Mr. Baraka, a leading African-American artist and intellectual, because Mr. Kane finds selected comments made at a paid appearance at a literary conference held at Coppin State College offensive.
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NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1998
Amiri Baraka -- revolutionary poet, outspoken teacher, controversial orator, award-winning dramatist, black cultural nationalist and legendary loose cannon -- brought his entire arsenal of language to Wilde Lake High School yesterday.The 63-year-old firebrand took to the darkened stage before the polite audience of 300 suburban teen-agers to read his work, answer questions and do the job expected of every good poet -- disturb the peace."All you young people, don't just throw your life away," Baraka said slowly into the hidden microphone as the audience bristled with nervous laughter.
NEWS
By Jessica Bacharach and Jessica Bacharach,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
He stood small against the large wood frame of the lectern, clenching the microphone between two fingers, oval eyeglasses overwhelming his heart-shaped face. But his voice pierced the audience with waves of intensity and soft melody. "Poetry, unless it moves you to do something, is meaningless," Amiri Baraka said. An award-winning African-American writer, musician, political activist and professor, Baraka, 66, began writing as a child. He spoke last week at a senior awards program sponsored by River Hill High School Black Student Achievement Program Parent Advisory Council.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1998
Amiri Baraka -- revolutionary poet, outspoken teacher, controversial orator, award-winning dramatist, black cultural nationalist and legendary loose cannon -- brought his entire arsenal of language to Wilde Lake High School yesterday.The 63-year-old firebrand took to the darkened stage before the polite audience of 300 suburban teen-agers to read his work, answer questions and do the job expected of every good poet -- disturb the peace."All you young people, don't just throw your life away," Baraka said slowly into the hidden microphone as the audience bristled with nervous laughter.
NEWS
By Jessica Bacharach and Jessica Bacharach,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
He stood small against the large wood frame of the lectern, clenching the microphone between two fingers, oval eyeglasses overwhelming his heart-shaped face. But his voice pierced the audience with waves of intensity and soft melody. "Poetry, unless it moves you to do something, is meaningless," Amiri Baraka said. An award-winning writer, musician, political activist and professor, Baraka, 66, began writing as a child. He spoke last week at a senior awards program sponsored by River Hill High School Black Student Achievement Program Parent Advisory Council.
NEWS
By Jessica Bacharach and Jessica Bacharach,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
He stood small against the large wood frame of the lectern, clenching the microphone between two fingers, oval eyeglasses overwhelming his heart-shaped face. But his voice pierced the audience with waves of intensity and soft melody. "Poetry, unless it moves you to do something, is meaningless," Amiri Baraka said. An award-winning African-American writer, musician, political activist and professor, Baraka, 66, began writing as a child. He spoke last week at a senior awards program sponsored by River Hill High School Black Student Achievement Program Parent Advisory Council.
FEATURES
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Contributing Writer | April 16, 1994
The best moments in "The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg" are the unlikeliest.In a battered brown jacket, jeans and a long, black beard, Mr. Ginsberg sits across from William F. Buckley, clean-shaven and wearing a thin-lapeled blue suit. Mr. Buckley tosses a question to the poet, and Mr. Ginsberg quickly announces that he'd prefer to read a poem.He brags that he wrote the poem on LSD. Mr. Buckley tries to maintain his composure. "Under the influence?" he asks, incredulous. Mr. Ginsberg concedes that it is so. As he reads, Mr. Buckley nods, smile and charm intact.
NEWS
March 26, 2003
Baraka employs the resources of his tradition On March 15, The Sun's article "Literary warrior uses poetry as a weapon" presented fair and balanced coverage of the controversy surrounding Amiri Baraka's poem "Somebody Blew Up America." I find it disturbing, however, that Gregory Kane's column "Black liberals need to respond to insult of Rice by Baraka" (March 19) suggests that members of the state government should have censured the remarks of Mr. Baraka, a leading African-American artist and intellectual, because Mr. Kane finds selected comments made at a paid appearance at a literary conference held at Coppin State College offensive.
FEATURES
By Cary Darling and Cary Darling,Orange County Register | April 26, 1994
Lisa Jones' sensationally sassy new book, "Bulletproof Diva," is subtitled "Tales of Race, Sex and Hair." That about says it all.This collection of previously published essays, mostly from the Village Voice between 1990 and 1993, comes from someone who's pondered long and hard about what it's like to be a black woman at the backside of the 20th century. She's tough, and like a diva from another era, Gloria Gaynor, she will survive.But this is one woman who's not going to sacrifice looking sharp or her sharp sense of humor on the blunted altar of political correctness.
NEWS
By Jessica Bacharach and Jessica Bacharach,SUN STAFF | May 24, 2001
He stood small against the large wood frame of the lectern, clenching the microphone between two fingers, oval eyeglasses overwhelming his heart-shaped face. But his voice pierced the audience with waves of intensity and soft melody. "Poetry, unless it moves you to do something, is meaningless," Amiri Baraka said. An award-winning writer, musician, political activist and professor, Baraka, 66, began writing as a child. He spoke last week at a senior awards program sponsored by River Hill High School Black Student Achievement Program Parent Advisory Council.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1998
Amiri Baraka -- revolutionary poet, outspoken teacher, controversial orator, award-winning dramatist, black cultural nationalist and legendary loose cannon -- brought his entire arsenal of language to Wilde Lake High School yesterday.The 63-year-old firebrand took to the darkened stage before the polite audience of 300 suburban teen-agers to read his work, answer questions and do the job expected of every good poet -- disturb the peace."All you young people, don't just throw your life away," Baraka said slowly into the hidden microphone as the audience bristled with nervous laughter.
NEWS
By Jill Hudson Neal and Jill Hudson Neal,SUN STAFF | September 29, 1998
Amiri Baraka -- revolutionary poet, outspoken teacher, controversial orator, award-winning dramatist, black cultural nationalist and legendary loose cannon -- brought his entire arsenal of language to Wilde Lake High School yesterday.The 63-year-old firebrand took to the darkened stage before the polite audience of 300 suburban teen-agers to read his work, answer questions and do the job expected of every good poet -- disturb the peace."All you young people, don't just throw your life away," Baraka said slowly into the hidden microphone as the audience bristled with nervous laughter.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | October 1, 1995
AMERICANS COMPLAIN constantly about the quality and content of their popular music. It is said to be vulgar, vicious, venal, cheap, superficial, noisy and inimical to the moral progress of society. In every decade from ragtime to rap, the verdict has been the same: Pop music is ruining the country.Yet here's the strange thing: From the earliest days of sheet music and piano rolls to the era of digital compact discs, those same complaining Americans continue to buy pop music in staggering quantities -- and so does much of the rest of the world.
FEATURES
By Cary Darling and Cary Darling,Orange County Register | April 26, 1994
Lisa Jones' sensationally sassy new book, "Bulletproof Diva," is subtitled "Tales of Race, Sex and Hair." That about says it all.This collection of previously published essays, mostly from the Village Voice between 1990 and 1993, comes from someone who's pondered long and hard about what it's like to be a black woman at the backside of the 20th century. She's tough, and like a diva from another era, Gloria Gaynor, she will survive.But this is one woman who's not going to sacrifice looking sharp or her sharp sense of humor on the blunted altar of political correctness.
FEATURES
By Scott Timberg and Scott Timberg,Contributing Writer | April 16, 1994
The best moments in "The Life and Times of Allen Ginsberg" are the unlikeliest.In a battered brown jacket, jeans and a long, black beard, Mr. Ginsberg sits across from William F. Buckley, clean-shaven and wearing a thin-lapeled blue suit. Mr. Buckley tosses a question to the poet, and Mr. Ginsberg quickly announces that he'd prefer to read a poem.He brags that he wrote the poem on LSD. Mr. Buckley tries to maintain his composure. "Under the influence?" he asks, incredulous. Mr. Ginsberg concedes that it is so. As he reads, Mr. Buckley nods, smile and charm intact.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | October 1, 1995
AMERICANS COMPLAIN constantly about the quality and content of their popular music. It is said to be vulgar, vicious, venal, cheap, superficial, noisy and inimical to the moral progress of society. In every decade from ragtime to rap, the verdict has been the same: Pop music is ruining the country.Yet here's the strange thing: From the earliest days of sheet music and piano rolls to the era of digital compact discs, those same complaining Americans continue to buy pop music in staggering quantities -- and so does much of the rest of the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 1999
Amiri BarakaBaraka is a playwright, novelist, short story writer and poet.In 1961, Baraka released his first collection of poetry, "Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note." It bespeaks Baraka's alienation from mainstream society.In his poem "The Dead Lecturer," Baraka professes a desire to escape into a world of black action.Baraka's other poetry collections include "Black Magic," "In the Tradition" and "Wise."Baraka is most noted for his play "Dutchman" (1964), which the Village Voice awarded with an Obie.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
Artist and poet Amiri Baraka, formerly known as Leroi Jones, will read from his work at 8 p.m. tomorrow at the Maryland Institute, College of Art's Mount Royal Station Auditorium.One of the more influential African-American artists of the 20th century, Mr. Baraka has directed several community arts programs, such as the Black Arts Repertory Theatre-School in Harlem, and has written many books of poetry, drama, fiction and non-fiction.He will speak as part of the Institute's "Spectrum of Poetic Fire" poetry series organized by faculty member and poet Joe Cardarelli.
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