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By COX NEWS SERVICE | April 9, 2000
ATLANTA -- The younger of two wives of Jamil Abdullah Al-Amin, accused in the killing of a sheriff's deputy, had a "rugged life" before she met the former Black Panther-turned-Muslim imam, said her maternal grandfather, James Goudelock. Tamesha Rachell Goudelock, a Gainesville, Ga., native who was 17 when she married Al-Amin three years ago, was farmed out to relatives, friends and foster homes by her mother, the grandfather said. The man who fathered Tamesha and three of her four younger siblings is dead, he said.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | October 13, 2006
In The Last King of Scotland, Forest Whitaker gives a performance huge in size and spirit and terrifying in its downward-spiraling momentum. As Gen. Idi Amin, the Ugandan dictator who deposed President Milton Obote in 1971, Whitaker embodies the explosion of energy and the urgent desire for legitimacy that comes with the violent overthrow of any government. Then the power surge dissipates and debauchery ensues as political self-preservation becomes Amin's only goal. He sets tribe against tribe and attempts to use warlord tactics and ethnic cleansing to unite the country behind him. He's a human shark, not just because of his ferocity, but also because he feels that if he stops moving and devouring his prey, he will die. From Whitaker's first entrance, this movie does what All the King's Men failed to do: It expresses the visceral connection of a popular demagogue and his people.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2002
Eric El-Amin, a religious activist, community leader and former policy adviser in the Baltimore City Health Department, died Friday of a liver ailment at Johns Hopkins Hospital. The Woodlawn resident was 47 Mr. El-Amin was a devoted member of the Muslim American Society, and worked for many years on the public relations staff of Imam W. Deen Muhammed, leader of the religious group. In recent years, he traveled with Muslim-American delegations that met with Pope John Paul II, Patriarch Bartholomew I of the Eastern Orthodox Church and the Grand Mufti of Syria.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Anderson and John Anderson,Special to Newsday | October 1, 2006
BURBANK, Calif.-- --Forest Whitaker still uses the occasional Britishism, a vestige of his part in Neil Jordan's gender-bender, The Crying Game. If it weren't so emotionally painful to pick up an alto sax, Whitaker could probably revisit Bird with a few jazz blasts from his Charlie Parker past. Ten years from now, he says, he may not be thinking about Panic Room, but he'll probably be able to drill a safe. The research and immersion in character that Whitaker has performed for the various roles he's created -- from the football star in Fast Times at Ridgemont High, to his Private Garlick in Good Morning, Vietnam, to his breakout role channeling Charlie Parker -- have left their traces on his own character, he says.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | October 16, 1996
The Wilde Lake boys and Centennial girls tuned up for next week's Howard County championships by winning a competitive quad meet that included Oakland Mills and Atholton yesterday at Howard Community College.Two Centennial runners, Jeff Olenick and Neha Amin, won the individual boys and girls races.This was an eagerly-awaited, first head-to-head confrontation with Atholton for the two-time defending county champion Wildecats, and the narrow 38-42 margin of victory was probably a little closer than coach Charlie Shoemaker would have liked.
NEWS
By David Kelly and Mark Porubcansky and David Kelly and Mark Porubcansky,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 28, 2003
BAGHDAD, Iraq -- The U.S. military said yesterday that it had captured Gen. Hussam Mohammad Amin, Saddam Hussein's liaison with United Nations inspectors searching for weapons of mass destruction inside Iraq. The general, No. 49 on the list of the 55 most-wanted members of Hussein's regime, was caught west of Baghdad on a road heading toward Jordan and Syria, officials said. The U.S. Central Command in Qatar reported that Amin was "now under coalition control." Amin had led Iraq's National Monitoring Directorate, which tracked the country's armaments, and he met frequently with U.N. inspectors.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Shopping for Afghan warlords was a very '80s thing to do in the borderlands of Pakistan, and it was a buyer's market. The Soviet Union had invaded Afghanistan, just across the mountains to the west, and the warlords offered the best hope for winning back the country. So, in the streets and bazaars of frontier towns such as Peshawar, Quetta and Chitral, an exotic assortment of buyers lined up to inspect the merchandise. CIA men shopped for mujahedeen warriors to lead the charge. Arms dealers shopped for conduits to deliver the goods.
FEATURES
February 2, 2006
Feb. 2 1653: New Amsterdam - now New York City - was incorporated. 1882: Irish poet and novelist James Joyce was born near Dublin. 1943: The final Nazi forces from the Battle of Stalingrad surrendered in a victory for the Soviets in World War II. 1971: Idi Amin assumed power in Uganda, after a coup.
NEWS
April 17, 2002
THE ELDERLY woman stood in the parking lot of the post office on Dolfield Avenue, looking across the way at the throng of people entering, leaving and standing outside the March Funeral Home. The numbers must have been in the hundreds. March's parking lot had long ago been filled, leaving those who wanted to attend the services the option of parking along Wabash Avenue. Some swung around to Dolfield, prompting a minor traffic jam on this unusually warm April afternoon along this usually low-traffic street.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | October 7, 2001
THE ROOTS of Islam run deep in America, dating back nearly as far as Judaism and Christianity. The religion arrived with Africans who were forcibly brought to these shores. The most renowned of them was Kunta Kinte, made famous when his descendant Alex Haley penned the historical novel Roots in the 1970s. Haley also wrote the autobiography of a man named Malcolm X, whose great-great-grandfather, Ajar, was a Muslim from the Bambara people of Mali. Ibrahim Abd ar-Rahman Diallo of Guinea arrived here in 1788.
FEATURES
February 2, 2006
Feb. 2 1653: New Amsterdam - now New York City - was incorporated. 1882: Irish poet and novelist James Joyce was born near Dublin. 1943: The final Nazi forces from the Battle of Stalingrad surrendered in a victory for the Soviets in World War II. 1971: Idi Amin assumed power in Uganda, after a coup.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 15, 2006
BAGHDAD, Iraq --The chief judge in the trial of Saddam Hussein has submitted a letter of resignation, saying he is frustrated with the tribunal's failure to defend him against widespread criticism in recent weeks, according to a fellow judge on the tribunal. But the resignation is not final, and the tribunal has not accepted it. The colleague said at least one tribunal official had traveled to where the judge, Rizhar Muhammad Amin, lives in Kurdistan to try to persuade him to stay on. Other judges reached yesterday said they were not aware of Amin's desire to step down, and the tribunal's official spokesman could not be reached for comment.
NEWS
October 12, 2005
Milton Obote, 80, Uganda's first prime minister and a two-time president whose initial term ended with a coup led by Idi Amin and whose second was known for its harsh repression, died Monday at a South African hospital after a series of illnesses, said Henry Mayega, secretary-general of Obote's Ugandan People's Congress. He had been living in exile in Zambia. Mr. Obote served as Uganda's first prime minister after independence in 1962, when the country was ruled by King Mutesa II. He staged a coup in 1966 and declared himself president.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two mass graves that appear to contain the remains of as many as 7,000 people killed by Saddam Hussein's government have been discovered in southern Iraq, according to an Iraqi government minister. The new Iraqi government may use some of the remains to build its case against war crimes suspects, including Hussein, Human Rights Minister Bakhtiar Amin said yesterday. Iraqi officials said they have been unable to excavate the burial grounds found earlier this year because of security concerns and because Iraq lacks enough forensic workers to perform the grisly task.
FEATURES
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,SUN STAFF | February 11, 2004
Shopping for Afghan warlords was a very '80s thing to do in the borderlands of Pakistan, and it was a buyer's market. The Soviet Union had invaded Afghanistan, just across the mountains to the west, and the warlords offered the best hope for winning back the country. So, in the streets and bazaars of frontier towns such as Peshawar, Quetta and Chitral, an exotic assortment of buyers lined up to inspect the merchandise. CIA men shopped for mujahedeen warriors to lead the charge. Arms dealers shopped for conduits to deliver the goods.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 5, 2003
NAJIB AMIN will live forever or die trying. He is 71 years old and still putting the kids through their paces. Sometimes they think he's not talking their language. But there are days, like last week with Julian Harris, where they come back to tell Amin he was right, and look how their lives are working out. Julian came in from Chicago. Amin remembers him as puffed up, exploding with energy, bragging to everybody in the locker room that he was better than they were. You never know about kids.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | December 5, 2003
NAJIB AMIN will live forever or die trying. He is 71 years old and still putting the kids through their paces. Sometimes they think he's not talking their language. But there are days, like last week with Julian Harris, where they come back to tell Amin he was right, and look how their lives are working out. Julian came in from Chicago. Amin remembers him as puffed up, exploding with energy, bragging to everybody in the locker room that he was better than they were. You never know about kids.
NEWS
By Solomon Moore and Solomon Moore,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 16, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Two mass graves that appear to contain the remains of as many as 7,000 people killed by Saddam Hussein's government have been discovered in southern Iraq, according to an Iraqi government minister. The new Iraqi government may use some of the remains to build its case against war crimes suspects, including Hussein, Human Rights Minister Bakhtiar Amin said yesterday. Iraqi officials said they have been unable to excavate the burial grounds found earlier this year because of security concerns and because Iraq lacks enough forensic workers to perform the grisly task.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | August 24, 2003
"I can do anything anybody else can," Najib Amin says quietly, then, as if to prove the point, adds, "I can do a full split." With that, he begins melting into the floor of his basement recreation room, his legs forming a giant wishbone as they spread farther ... and farther ... and farther apart. Normally, the sight of a 71-year-old man attempting to do a 180-degree split -- the bread-and-butter move of every bouncy, "go-team-go" high school cheerleader -- would trigger one thought: double hernia.
NEWS
By Tom Dunkel and Tom Dunkel,Sun Staff | August 24, 2003
It looks like a piece of minimalist art, but those are samples of the seven, ascending achievement belts (white, yellow, orange, green, purple, brown, and black) hanging on one wall of Shotokan Karate Club of Maryland. It takes on average 3 1/2 years to progress from white to first-level black belt. Only about one in 300 students gets that far, according to Farid Amin, who regularly teaches at the club. Karate is a demanding pastime. Those who stick with it say the key is to not become too color- conscious.
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