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SPORTS
Sun Staff report | March 13, 2012
Severna Park boys soccer coach Roy Dunshee has resigned from his position to take a coaching job at Amherst College, the school announced in a press release. Coaches interested in the vacancy are asked to contact athletic director Wayne Mook at 410-544-7462 or wmook@aacps.org. Only teachers or NFHS credentialed coaches will be considered.  
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NEWS
April 29, 2014
The horrifying statistics on rape and sexual assault on college campuses in this country speak for themselves. Studies show that about one in five undergraduate women has experienced such an attack or an attempted attack at some point during their college years, but only 12 percent of incidents are reported. Why is justice so difficult to find in what is supposed to be a protected and enlightened atmosphere of a college or university? Advocates say there are numerous institutional barriers that discourage reporting, including administrators who treat reports of sexual assault with disbelief and on-campus judicial systems that are difficult for a victim to navigate.
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NEWS
October 5, 1990
Welcome to Charles H. Trout, the 24th president of Washington College, Maryland's institution of higher education, in Chestertown. Washington may be 209 years old and going strong, but like every other American college, it faces the daunting prospects of a shrinking pool of prospective freshmen and hard times for prospective donors. Mr. Trout will get his fins wet in the travails of academe, if not the Chester River, very swiftly.The small college, of which Washington is exemplary, was never more important to American life than when large research universities are looking inward, troubled and insecure.
SPORTS
Sun Staff report | March 13, 2012
Severna Park boys soccer coach Roy Dunshee has resigned from his position to take a coaching job at Amherst College, the school announced in a press release. Coaches interested in the vacancy are asked to contact athletic director Wayne Mook at 410-544-7462 or wmook@aacps.org. Only teachers or NFHS credentialed coaches will be considered.  
NEWS
March 3, 1998
Todd Duncan,95, the baritone who created the role of Porgy in Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess" and was the first black singer to join the New York City Opera, died Saturday at his home in Washington.He was known for his elegant phrasing and burnished tone and his dramatic persuasiveness. Those qualities won him his debut role at the New York City Opera in 1945, when he sang Tonio in a production of Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci." His City Opera debut made him the first black singer to perform opera with a white cast.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
He was a beach bum in Hawaii. He was a fashion model in Japan. He was head of his own casual clothing company in California. And, most recently, he was an advertising executive in Baltimore.But the venture William F. Fried considers most captivating is what he's doing now: publishing an unusual book for those across the nation wanting to buy, sell or improve their homes."It's been very successful -- we were profitable after the first year," Mr. Fried says of his soft-cover book entitled "Your American Dream Home."
NEWS
April 29, 2014
The horrifying statistics on rape and sexual assault on college campuses in this country speak for themselves. Studies show that about one in five undergraduate women has experienced such an attack or an attempted attack at some point during their college years, but only 12 percent of incidents are reported. Why is justice so difficult to find in what is supposed to be a protected and enlightened atmosphere of a college or university? Advocates say there are numerous institutional barriers that discourage reporting, including administrators who treat reports of sexual assault with disbelief and on-campus judicial systems that are difficult for a victim to navigate.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 2008
BEREA, Ky. - Berea College, founded 150 years ago to educate freed slaves and "poor white mountaineers," accepts only applicants from low-income families, and it charges no tuition. "You can literally come to Berea with nothing but what you can carry, and graduate debt-free," said Joseph P. Bagnoli Jr., the associate provost for enrollment management. "We call it the best education money can't buy." Actually, what buys that education is Berea's $1.1 billion endowment, which puts the college among the nation's wealthiest.
NEWS
By Brian Till | June 6, 2007
Last month, author Barbara Ehrenreich gave a chilling address to the Class of 2007 at Haverford College near Philadelphia. She told the graduates, "At the moment you accept your diploma today, you will have an average debt of $20,000 and no health insurance. You may be feeling desperate enough to take whatever comes along. Some of you will get caged in cubicles until you're ejected by the next wave of layoffs." She continued: "Others - some of the best and brightest of you, in fact - will still be behind a counter in Starbucks or Borders three years down the road."
EXPLORE
August 27, 2012
Kathryn Klein, M.D., M.P.H. and an assistant professor of ophthalmology at the Krieger Children's Eye Center at the Wilmer Institute, is seeing patients at the Wilmer Eye Institute at Bel Air (formerly Parris-Castoro Eye Care Center). She has subspecialty training in pediatric ophthalmology and adult strabismus. Klein received her bachelor's degree from Amherst College. She completed medical school at Mt. Sinai School of Medicine and received a master's degree in public health from Columbia University.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 21, 2008
BEREA, Ky. - Berea College, founded 150 years ago to educate freed slaves and "poor white mountaineers," accepts only applicants from low-income families, and it charges no tuition. "You can literally come to Berea with nothing but what you can carry, and graduate debt-free," said Joseph P. Bagnoli Jr., the associate provost for enrollment management. "We call it the best education money can't buy." Actually, what buys that education is Berea's $1.1 billion endowment, which puts the college among the nation's wealthiest.
NEWS
By Brian Till | June 6, 2007
Last month, author Barbara Ehrenreich gave a chilling address to the Class of 2007 at Haverford College near Philadelphia. She told the graduates, "At the moment you accept your diploma today, you will have an average debt of $20,000 and no health insurance. You may be feeling desperate enough to take whatever comes along. Some of you will get caged in cubicles until you're ejected by the next wave of layoffs." She continued: "Others - some of the best and brightest of you, in fact - will still be behind a counter in Starbucks or Borders three years down the road."
NEWS
March 3, 1998
Todd Duncan,95, the baritone who created the role of Porgy in Gershwin's "Porgy and Bess" and was the first black singer to join the New York City Opera, died Saturday at his home in Washington.He was known for his elegant phrasing and burnished tone and his dramatic persuasiveness. Those qualities won him his debut role at the New York City Opera in 1945, when he sang Tonio in a production of Leoncavallo's "Pagliacci." His City Opera debut made him the first black singer to perform opera with a white cast.
BUSINESS
By Ellen James Martin and Ellen James Martin,Staff Writer | November 8, 1992
He was a beach bum in Hawaii. He was a fashion model in Japan. He was head of his own casual clothing company in California. And, most recently, he was an advertising executive in Baltimore.But the venture William F. Fried considers most captivating is what he's doing now: publishing an unusual book for those across the nation wanting to buy, sell or improve their homes."It's been very successful -- we were profitable after the first year," Mr. Fried says of his soft-cover book entitled "Your American Dream Home."
NEWS
October 5, 1990
Welcome to Charles H. Trout, the 24th president of Washington College, Maryland's institution of higher education, in Chestertown. Washington may be 209 years old and going strong, but like every other American college, it faces the daunting prospects of a shrinking pool of prospective freshmen and hard times for prospective donors. Mr. Trout will get his fins wet in the travails of academe, if not the Chester River, very swiftly.The small college, of which Washington is exemplary, was never more important to American life than when large research universities are looking inward, troubled and insecure.
NEWS
October 2, 2005
Leo Sternbach, 97, inventor of the revolutionary class of tranquilizers that included Valium, considered the first blockbuster drug, died Wednesday at his home in Chapel Hill, N.C. He led the development of more than a dozen important drugs during a six-decade career with Roche. His other breakthroughs include the sleeping pills Dalmane and Mogadon, Klonopin for epileptic seizures and Arfonad for limiting bleeding during brain surgery. Steve Marcus, 66, a jazz saxophonist who was an early exponent of the style that came to be known as fusion, died Sept.
NEWS
September 20, 2004
Columbia real estate firm Manekin names two to new positions Danielle Krantz has been named leasing and sales associate in the brokerage division of Columbia-based Manekin LLC. She represents tenants and landlords in leasing and sales of office and flex space in the Baltimore-Washington corridor. A Hamilton College graduate, she lived in Manhattan and handled marketing campaigns for Jean Paul Gaultier Fragrances. Liz Martin has been named information manager in the company's brokerage department, responsible for industry and company research, database management and marketing.
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