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Amerigo Vespucci

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By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | August 17, 1992
When Baltimoreans board the Italian tall ship Amerigo Vespucci today, they'll walk sleek teak decks that stretch 333 feet from bowsprit to the captain's garden and crane their necks for a glimpse of the top of the pine mast.They'll step around thick curls of rope that, propelled only by the muscle of men, lift the ship's sails skyward.They'll see their reflections in brass fittings and marvel at the gilded arabesques adorning the hull.Visitors to the Vespucci, the oldest ship in the Italian navy whose namesake explored the "New World," will feel the romance of the high seas and experience the regal splendor of the 19th century frigates that inspired its design.
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NEWS
June 27, 2014
It was ironic for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to use the term "Native Americans" recently when referring to descendants of the indigenous peoples who inhabited this continent before Europeans arrived ( "Redskins name controversy heats up with federal cancellation of trademark," June 18). Those native peoples would never call themselves "Americans. " The name "Americus" (Latin for America) was heavily inked onto early maps of the "New World" in large part as a promotional advertisement for a European adventurer and explorer named Amerigo Vespucci.
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NEWS
June 27, 2014
It was ironic for Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid to use the term "Native Americans" recently when referring to descendants of the indigenous peoples who inhabited this continent before Europeans arrived ( "Redskins name controversy heats up with federal cancellation of trademark," June 18). Those native peoples would never call themselves "Americans. " The name "Americus" (Latin for America) was heavily inked onto early maps of the "New World" in large part as a promotional advertisement for a European adventurer and explorer named Amerigo Vespucci.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 25, 2000
HE TOOK the morning tugboat out from Thames Street at the foot of Fells Point and started looking when he got near the Key Bridge. He was searching for a great ship, but also for pieces of his history. The ship was the Amerigo Vespucci. His history includes a father who first boarded her nearly 70 years ago. "And then," Tommy D'Alesandro III was saying at week's end, "somebody said, `She's coming,' but I couldn't see her. We were bouncing around in the water. They said she was hidden behind this pillar of the bridge.
NEWS
August 15, 1992
A TALL, HANDSOME ITALIAN: Mark down Monday, 1:15 p.m. That's when the Amerigo Vespucci, considered by many to be one of the world's most elegant tall ships -- it's undeniably one of the largest -- docks in the Inner Harbor for a weeklong visit.Starting on Tuesday, you can stroll the decks of this full-rigged tall ship and mingle with its crew. The black, brass-trimmed Amerigo Vespucci, which last visited Baltimore in July 1986 to huge crowds, promises to draw big-time again this visit.The ships will be open for public tours starting Tuesday from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Inner Harbor's West Wall.
NEWS
November 19, 1999
The Museum of Industry is such a valuable guardian of Baltimore's industrial heritage that any talk about its expansion is gratifying. Particularly because one of the nation's last remaining World War II Liberty ships would get a more accessible berth along Key Highway.Yet the recently announced plans are troubling as well: Included in the $8.5 million project is a new 500-foot pier sticking into the Inner Harbor.This proposed pier may be a good idea. Or it may not. Surrounding property owners are certainly up in arms because it would block their views of the harbor, reducing the resale value of their industrially-zoned land.
NEWS
May 24, 1992
One of the unique joys of the 1976 bicentennial year was the visit of the tall ships to Baltimore. Over the summer, 11 of those graceful vessels sailed up the Chesapeake to moor at the Inner Harbor basin. Tens of thousands of Baltimoreans came to view them. Even at 4 a.m., night owls could be seen admiring those ocean-goers.Happily for those who missed the 1976 event, those moments and memories will soon be repeated. From May 29 to Sept. 9, close to 30 sailing ships from Spain, Brazil, the Netherlands, Uruguay, Portugal, Italy, Germany and England are scheduled to visit the Inner Harbor as part of Baltimore's Operation Sail '92. They range from tall ships to frigates and schooners.
NEWS
August 22, 1992
TALL SHIPS X 2This is the last weekend to see the Italian tall ship Amerigo Vespucci at the Inner Harbor's West Wall. If you missed the Amerigo Vespucci back in 1986, this ship is one to see -- and it's open for visits from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. today, and from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow and Monday. Departure time is 9 a.m. Tuesday. Just when you learned to say "benvenuti," it'll be time to utter a hearty "willkommen."Because at noon Tuesday, the German tall ship Gorch Fock II arrives -- same place -- for its first visit to Baltimore since the city's first tall-ship extravaganza introduced area residents to the then-new Inner Harbor; that was the bicentennial year of 1976.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 4, 1996
What is it about Marylanders and Italian restaurants? You can put your waiters in tuxedos. You can offer a sophisticated cuisine and charge stratospheric prices. You can name your restaurant after Amerigo Vespucci, the explorer our great country was named after.Your customers will still come to dinner in their shirt-sleeves. Women will arrive with bare legs and in sandals. Shorts are not unheard of.Why this is so I have no idea, but it's doubly true if you're an Italian restaurant on the Annapolis dock, a restaurant which this time of year caters to boat owners and tourists.
NEWS
By Michael Olesker | June 25, 2000
HE TOOK the morning tugboat out from Thames Street at the foot of Fells Point and started looking when he got near the Key Bridge. He was searching for a great ship, but also for pieces of his history. The ship was the Amerigo Vespucci. His history includes a father who first boarded her nearly 70 years ago. "And then," Tommy D'Alesandro III was saying at week's end, "somebody said, `She's coming,' but I couldn't see her. We were bouncing around in the water. They said she was hidden behind this pillar of the bridge.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2000
NORFOLK, Va. - In majestic procession, the tall ships left this naval port yesterday to send Operation Sail 2000 on its way to its next stop: Baltimore. The 31 sailing ships that will turn Baltimore harbor into a municipality of masts will start arriving in the Inner Harbor today. The first three are expected to dock before noon. They are the Guayas, a 258-foot barque from Ecuador; Italy's 331-foot, full-rigged Amerigo Vespucci; and the 191-foot Indonesian barquentine Dewaruci. The fleet will be docked around the city waterfront, from the Inner Harbor west wall along the piers, at Fells Point and out to Locust Point and Canton.
NEWS
By JUNE ARNEY and JUNE ARNEY,SUN STAFF | June 18, 2000
When local organizers of OpSail 2000 learned last fall that an Italian ship, the Amerigo Vespucci, planned to bypass Baltimore during this week's festival of tall ships, they knew they had to reverse that decision. As president of Sail Baltimore, the group coordinating the arrival of more than 30 ships in and around the Inner Harbor starting Wednesday, William R. MacIntosh couldn't bear to have one of the largest, most elegant and most coveted tall ships in the world skip Baltimore by sailing directly from Norfolk, Va., to Philadelphia.
NEWS
November 19, 1999
The Museum of Industry is such a valuable guardian of Baltimore's industrial heritage that any talk about its expansion is gratifying. Particularly because one of the nation's last remaining World War II Liberty ships would get a more accessible berth along Key Highway.Yet the recently announced plans are troubling as well: Included in the $8.5 million project is a new 500-foot pier sticking into the Inner Harbor.This proposed pier may be a good idea. Or it may not. Surrounding property owners are certainly up in arms because it would block their views of the harbor, reducing the resale value of their industrially-zoned land.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | August 4, 1996
What is it about Marylanders and Italian restaurants? You can put your waiters in tuxedos. You can offer a sophisticated cuisine and charge stratospheric prices. You can name your restaurant after Amerigo Vespucci, the explorer our great country was named after.Your customers will still come to dinner in their shirt-sleeves. Women will arrive with bare legs and in sandals. Shorts are not unheard of.Why this is so I have no idea, but it's doubly true if you're an Italian restaurant on the Annapolis dock, a restaurant which this time of year caters to boat owners and tourists.
NEWS
August 22, 1992
TALL SHIPS X 2This is the last weekend to see the Italian tall ship Amerigo Vespucci at the Inner Harbor's West Wall. If you missed the Amerigo Vespucci back in 1986, this ship is one to see -- and it's open for visits from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. today, and from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. tomorrow and Monday. Departure time is 9 a.m. Tuesday. Just when you learned to say "benvenuti," it'll be time to utter a hearty "willkommen."Because at noon Tuesday, the German tall ship Gorch Fock II arrives -- same place -- for its first visit to Baltimore since the city's first tall-ship extravaganza introduced area residents to the then-new Inner Harbor; that was the bicentennial year of 1976.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Staff Writer | August 17, 1992
When Baltimoreans board the Italian tall ship Amerigo Vespucci today, they'll walk sleek teak decks that stretch 333 feet from bowsprit to the captain's garden and crane their necks for a glimpse of the top of the pine mast.They'll step around thick curls of rope that, propelled only by the muscle of men, lift the ship's sails skyward.They'll see their reflections in brass fittings and marvel at the gilded arabesques adorning the hull.Visitors to the Vespucci, the oldest ship in the Italian navy whose namesake explored the "New World," will feel the romance of the high seas and experience the regal splendor of the 19th century frigates that inspired its design.
NEWS
August 15, 1992
A TALL, HANDSOME ITALIAN: Mark down Monday, 1:15 p.m. That's when the Amerigo Vespucci, considered by many to be one of the world's most elegant tall ships -- it's undeniably one of the largest -- docks in the Inner Harbor for a weeklong visit.Starting on Tuesday, you can stroll the decks of this full-rigged tall ship and mingle with its crew. The black, brass-trimmed Amerigo Vespucci, which last visited Baltimore in July 1986 to huge crowds, promises to draw big-time again this visit.The ships will be open for public tours starting Tuesday from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. at the Inner Harbor's West Wall.
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