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NEWS
August 4, 2014
How would you like to receive a quarterly check from the federal government? Most taxpayers would surely be happy with such an arrangement. But here's the really good part: What if by accepting that check you were also helping your country reduce a form of air pollution that is a threat to human health and responsible for climate change while simultaneously developing a rational, sustainable energy policy? That sounds too good to be true, but remarkably, it may not be. Under The Healthy Climate and Family Security Act introduced last week by Maryland Rep. Chris Van Hollen, companies that drill for oil and gas or mine for coal would have to purchase through auction a permit to do so. Not a dime of the resulting revenue would be kept by the government but would simply be forwarded as checks to every man, woman and child.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 30, 2014
"You shouldn't get to call yourself an American company only when you want a handout from the American taxpayers," President Obama said last week. He was referring to American corporations now busily acquiring foreign companies in order to become non-American, thereby reducing their U.S. tax bills. But the president might as well have been talking about all large American multinationals. Only about a fifth of IBM's worldwide employees are American, for example, and only 40 percent of GE's.
NEWS
By Patrick Cha | July 30, 2014
Maryland native Joseph Gantt joined the Army at 18, serving with distinction as a Sergeant First Class in the South Pacific during World War II, even though the military segregated him because of the color of his skin. Gantt had redeployed to the front lines of Korea in December 1950 as a field medic with the 2nd Infantry Division when his unit was overrun by enemy forces. Gantt was thrown into a prison camp and reportedly died there in March 1951. But his wife, Clara Gantt, refused to lose faith.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | July 29, 2014
The Labor Department is expected to report this week that the economy added 235,000 jobs in July, and the unemployment rate remained steady at 6.1 percent. But that hardly tells the story. The jobless rate may be down from its recession peak of 10 percent, but much of this results from adults - discouraged by the lack of decent job openings - having given up altogether. They are neither employed nor looking for work. Only about half of the drop in the adult participation rate may be attributed to the Baby Boom generation reaching retirement age. Lacking adequate resources to retire, a larger percentage of adults over 65 are working now than before the recession.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 28, 2014
If you want to understand the chaos that is now Iraq with ISIS on the rise and almost everything America thought it had built crashing down, don't miss Frontline's "Losing Iraq" at  10 tomorrow night on PBS. No one on TV has done better investigative and long-form journalism on Iraq than Frontline. Period. And Tuesday's "Losing Iraq" is a stunning catalog of American ignorance, arrogance, lies and senseless death and destruction. If you thought you were over George W. Bush, Dick Cheney and Don Rumsfeld, this will make you seethe all over again at them and publications like the New York Times, which let Team Bush sell its lies and lead thousands of young Americans to their deaths.
NEWS
July 21, 2014
How sad that a Guantanamo detainee has to remind Americans that he is a human being ( "Detainees are human," July 16)! Here is a man imprisoned without charge for years, actually cleared for release in 2009 by six agencies of the U.S. government, and still we do not release him. There is no excuse for this. Adding further to this Kafka-like scenario, he is additionally punished for protesting this injustice. Come on, Americans! We must insist that this extreme violation of all that is decent stop immediately.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | July 21, 2014
A couple of times during "Sincerely, Me," an ambitious production presented by ArtsCentric, the audience is asked to imagine how poorer our world would be without the legacy of African American women who raised their voices in song. For the bulk of the show's two-and-a-half hours or so, the all-female cast offers a high-octane reminder of that legacy. About 40 covers of songs originally performed by the likes of Aretha Franklin, Patti LaBelle, the Shirelles, and the Supremes are packed into this work, all delivered with intense commitment and energy.
SPORTS
By Cristie Kerr and The Baltimore Sun | July 20, 2014
[Editor's note: Cristie Kerr, a member of Team USA in the inaugural LPGA International Crown, to be played Thursday-Sunday at Caves Valley Golf Club, has been blogging for The Baltimore Sun about her experience] One of the most appealing aspects of the upcoming International Crown, as I wrote two weeks ago , is the way there are different layers of competition built into the event. First and foremost, your country had to qualify to play in the event. The final field of eight countries was determined by the combined Rolex World Ranking of the top four players from each country.
NEWS
By E.R. Shipp | July 19, 2014
Derek Jeter's impending retirement from Major League Baseball after 20 years, marked by emotional tributes during the All Star Game last week, is not the only reason this New York Yankees fan has been unsettled by the passage of time. JET magazine, the pocket-sized source of news about blacks since 1951, has bowed to the ages and gone digital with a new app. But its debut digital issue this month makes clear that JET is no longer the magazine for anyone who claims to be at least middle-aged.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Clearly, the American League has been turned upside-down over the first half of the 2014 season. The AL West now features three of the five winningest teams in the league, and the AL East has not lived up to preseason expectations -- except in Baltimore, of course. That's why the three-city West Coast road trip that starts Friday night in Oakland will be a major test of the legitimacy of the Orioles as the top team in the AL East. The Orioles arrived at the All-Star break with a four-game lead over the second-place Toronto Blue Jays -- which is the second-biggest division lead in the major leagues -- but the first-half demise of the defending world champion Boston Red Sox and a Tampa Bay Rays team that was considered a preseason favorite has thrown into doubt the overall quality of the division.
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