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Americans With Disabilities

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NEWS
January 26, 1993
Carroll County commissioners yesterday approved a plan outlining how the county's hiring practices comply with the Americans With Disabilities Act.Jimmie Saylor, director of the county's Department of Human Resources and Personnel Services, said the plan outlines "what we do to accommodate the disabled."Mr. Saylor also said the plan describes how the county complies with the Americans With Disabilities Act, "as well as many other laws."The plan notes, for instance, that the county's recruitment office, as well as the County Office Building, is accessible to the disabled, and that county officials use Community Access TV, radio and other methods to advertise openings on the staff.
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BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | March 27, 2013
Baltimore's oldest cab company and the Maryland Transit Administration are updating their fleets for wheelchair-using customers, replacing small buses and minivans with an SUV-like vehicle that provides a smoother, more civilized ride. The MV-1 is designed specifically to transport disabled passengers and already is in use in cities such as Pittsburgh, Chicago and Dallas. Built in Indiana, it is the only production vehicle that meets Americans with Disabilities Act guidelines. Yellow Cab and sister company 1010 Sedan purchased 10 MV-1s and began using them this week.
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BUSINESS
April 27, 1992
WHO TO CALLAgencies that provide free advice on the Americans with Disabilities Act:GENERAL INFORMATIONU.S. Department of Justice ADA Hotline: (202) 514-0301. TDD: (202) 514-0381Job Accommodation Network ADA Hotline: (800) 232-9675Equal Employment Opportunity Commission: (800) 800-EEOC. Same number for TDD.Maryland Governor's Office for Handicapped Individuals: 333-3098Mid-Atlantic Disability & Business Technical Assistance Center: (800) ADA-4999. TDD: (703) 525-3268.TransCent: (301) 424-2002.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2011
Verizon Communications has agreed to pay $20 million to settle a discrimination lawsuit charging the telecommunications giant with failing to accommodate hundreds of workers whose absences were caused by their disabilities. The lawsuit and a consent decree settling the suit were filed Wednesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. The settlement amount was the largest of any single EEOC lawsuit alleging violations of the Americans With Disabilities Act, or ADA, the commission said.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
The Anne Arundel County Commission on Disability Issues will meet from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday in the Chesapeake Room on the second floor of the Heritage Complex, 2664 Riva Road, Annapolis. George Failla of the Maryland Department of Disabilities will speak on legislative issues before the General Assembly. The commission meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month. To request accommodations, call the Americans with Disabilities Act office, 410-222-4383; voice/Maryland Relay 711, or e-mail, exjord00@aa county.
NEWS
By Kevin T. McVey and Kevin T. McVey,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
Baltimore County has been allocated $16.4 million in the state highway budget for concept design and streetscape projects, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele announced yesterday at a news conference in Overlea. The improvements announced yesterday include three miles of Route 7 (Philadelphia Road) between U.S. 40 and the Beltway, and a section of U.S. 1 from the Baltimore City line to the Beltway for concept planning. The segment between U.S. 40 and the Baltimore City line was allotted $2.1 million for engineering and $14.1 million for construction.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | March 18, 1993
ST. PAUL, Minn. -- In what is apparently the first lawsuit of its kind in the nation, the University of Minnesota and the estate of a man who died of AIDS complications are suing his union because its health insurance plan did not pay full benefits for him.The impact of the lawsuit could go far beyond the AIDS community because it is being filed under the new wide-ranging Americans With Disabilities Act, says Gayle Dixon, legal program coordinator for...
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
An Anne Arundel County elementary school teacher was wrongfully terminated from his job because he is HIV-positive, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleges in its suit that Chesapeake Academy, a private school in Arnold, discriminated against the teacher because of his disability by not renewing his contract, a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The complaint was filed Monday in Baltimore. Chauncey Stevenson, a second-grade and after-school music teacher, had been employed since 2003 and received good evaluations from his supervisors, parents and students during his tenure, according to EEOC lawyers.
NEWS
April 13, 1995
In his mind, Jacob Halberstam, a bright 6-year-old who attends Hampstead Elementary School in Carroll County, doesn't have a disability. Though he was born with stumps for arms and one leg half the length of the other, young Jacob plays soccer, hockey, draws, reads, rides horses and keeps up with his classmates and siblings. There seems to be little he cannot do.The youngster, in fact, can't understand why anyone would single him out for an award. When the Foundation for Exceptional Children bestowed on Jacob a "Yes I Can" award in the category of independent living, his mother, Bonnie Halberstam, explained to her son that he was being recognized for all the things he could do that come easier to children without physical handicaps, such as going to the bathroom alone.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | January 22, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The federal government proposed sweeping rules yesterday under which stores, restaurants, banks, theaters, hotels and offices must take specific new steps to accommodate people who are disabled in any way.The stated purpose of the rules is to make sure that any new or redesigned "places of public accommodation and commercial facilities," including everything from baseball bleachers to automated teller machines, will be "readily accessible to...
NEWS
June 15, 2011
Recently, a Federal judge in Baltimore ruled that a Boy Scout chapter did not have to provide accommodations for its disabled members under the Americans with Disability Act. What has happened the basic Scout tenets, "do a good turn daily, help other people" and the Scout Law "A Scout is ...helpful, friendly, kind ... " Are these no longer the basic creed of Scouting? Benjamin J. Dubin, Baltimore The writer is vice chairman of Baltimore County's Commission on Disabilities.
NEWS
February 22, 2009
The Anne Arundel County Commission on Disability Issues will meet from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Tuesday in the Chesapeake Room on the second floor of the Heritage Complex, 2664 Riva Road, Annapolis. George Failla of the Maryland Department of Disabilities will speak on legislative issues before the General Assembly. The commission meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month. To request accommodations, call the Americans with Disabilities Act office, 410-222-4383; voice/Maryland Relay 711, or e-mail, exjord00@aa county.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | September 11, 2008
An Anne Arundel County elementary school teacher was wrongfully terminated from his job because he is HIV-positive, according to a lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission alleges in its suit that Chesapeake Academy, a private school in Arnold, discriminated against the teacher because of his disability by not renewing his contract, a violation of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The complaint was filed Monday in Baltimore. Chauncey Stevenson, a second-grade and after-school music teacher, had been employed since 2003 and received good evaluations from his supervisors, parents and students during his tenure, according to EEOC lawyers.
NEWS
By Lynne Landsberg | April 2, 2008
I've been told that in my former life, I was an effortless multi-tasker, a fast talker and a quick thinker. I had speaking engagements across the country and composed my most powerful speeches in airplanes and taxis. In that former life, I was Rabbi Lynne Landsberg, associate director of the Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism, then the Union of Reform Judaism's director for the mid-Atlantic region, including Maryland. I am still Rabbi Lynne Landsberg, but the rest has changed. In 1999, I suffered a traumatic brain injury when my Jeep Cherokee skidded on a patch of black ice and wrapped around a tree.
NEWS
By Kevin T. McVey and Kevin T. McVey,SUN STAFF | October 14, 2004
Baltimore County has been allocated $16.4 million in the state highway budget for concept design and streetscape projects, Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele announced yesterday at a news conference in Overlea. The improvements announced yesterday include three miles of Route 7 (Philadelphia Road) between U.S. 40 and the Beltway, and a section of U.S. 1 from the Baltimore City line to the Beltway for concept planning. The segment between U.S. 40 and the Baltimore City line was allotted $2.1 million for engineering and $14.1 million for construction.
TOPIC
By Beth A. Haller | June 10, 2001
THE REAL STORY is about a man, who happens to have a disability, trying to pursue his profession. But much of that has been pushed aside by our national obsession with sports. It's simple: Casey Martin, a person with a disability, is receiving the accommodation he needs, a golf cart, to participate in a public event, PGA competition. The Supreme Court decision of May 29 has garnered much media attention, but some of the stories and columns gloss over the true news in the decision - maintaining the legal rights of all Americans with disabilities.
TOPIC
By Beth A. Haller | June 10, 2001
THE REAL STORY is about a man, who happens to have a disability, trying to pursue his profession. But much of that has been pushed aside by our national obsession with sports. It's simple: Casey Martin, a person with a disability, is receiving the accommodation he needs, a golf cart, to participate in a public event, PGA competition. The Supreme Court decision of May 29 has garnered much media attention, but some of the stories and columns gloss over the true news in the decision - maintaining the legal rights of all Americans with disabilities.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | July 16, 2000
WASHINGTON - On the eve of the 10th anniversary of a law to end discrimination against 57 million Americans with disabilities, advocates claim that progress under it has been too slow, businesses that the burdens have been too great and a federal panel that the Clinton administration's enforcement has been timid. All agree that the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act has changed public attitudes and improved access for the disabled. Still, disability groups are becoming more vocal, impatient and litigious as they see the promise of the landmark civil rights law thwarted by court decisions limiting the definition of disability and frustrated by spotty compliance.
NEWS
By John O'neil and John O'neil,New York Times News Service | September 29, 1999
Elizabeth Twohy, who had polio as a child, uses a wheelchair most of the day, and the list of little things that are hard to do in a wheelchair is just about endless. But she has a friend, Ike, who helps out.He picks up things she drops, turns light switches on and off, puts clothes in the dryer and takes the dishes out of the dishwasher, sorts the recyclables and brings her the telephone.The only thing that Ike can't do that would be really nice would be to drive the car, said Twohy, director of disability services for Brookdale Community College in Lincroft, N.J. Ike does have a license, but it is a dog license.
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