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BUSINESS
January 27, 2010
WASHINGTON - A million and a half more Americans volunteered during the span of a year ending in September 2009, a period marked by job losses and a faltering economy. About 63.4 million people ages 16 and older volunteered at least once between September 2008 and September 2009, according to a report released Tuesday by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. That's about a 1.6 million increase compared with the 61.8 million people who helped their communities in 2008, but not as many as the 65.4 million who lent a hand in 2005.
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SPORTS
Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
Major league officials were relieved when the Orioles and Royals were able to play Game 1 of the American League Championship Series at Camden Yards in spite of a constant threat of rain. They might not be so lucky on Monday night. The forecast calls for a 100 percent chance of rain during the day and a 90 percent chance of rain on Monday night in the Kansas City area. If Mother Nature makes it impossible to get the game in, the same scenario will apply that was in play in Baltimore.
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NEWS
March 27, 2010
Passing health reform is a historic victory for all Americans -- for families, seniors, young people, workers, and small businesses alike. All Americans will now have the security of knowing that they don't risk losing the American dream if they get sick or are in an accident. It guarantees all Americans affordable health insurance options, extending coverage to 32 million who are currently uninsured. Thank you to all who voted for this legislation. Wilton Taylor, Baltimore
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Races in the Baltimore Running Festival will begin an hour earlier than originally scheduled because of the Orioles' deep run into the baseball postseason. In a letter to participants posted on the running festival's website , organizer Lee Corrigan wrote that start times were made earlier to "ensure all public safety personnel can be deployed in an organized fashion. " The festival, which includes a marathon, half-marathon, group relay, 5k and kids race, will stagger starting times between 7 a.m. and 8:45 a.m. on Oct. 18, the day the Orioles and Kansas City Royals would potentially play Game 7 of the American League Championship Series at Camden Yards.
NEWS
September 19, 2013
Letter writer Michael Saltsman is unequivocally wrong when he states that raising the minimum wage kills jobs (" Job-killer, thy name is minimum wage," Sept. 16). He opines that the editorial page of The Sun is wrong in cherry picking dates to prove their point and yet conveniently picks a date from 20 years ago to prove his. And should a number arbitrarily chosen in 1938 have any more relevance than a footnote today? When wages are too low, people simply elect not to work. They may become part of the underground economy, pursue unsavory endeavors and engage in activities that some find morally objectionable.
NEWS
March 23, 2010
I agree with the decision that President Obama made to extend health coverage to 32 million uninsured Americans. First of all, this is a good thing for everyone in the U.S.A. no matter who you are. Second of all, this bill will help a lot of poor people in the who are unable to pay for health insurance but need it. Finally, I think President Obama and everyone who voted for this bill made the right decision for the first time in recent years to really help out ordinary Americans. This is a great thing happening to us, and we all will benefit in the long run!
NEWS
May 26, 2011
Regarding the article crowing about the increase of Chinese students at Maryland Institute College of Art ("MICA enjoys an Eastern influx" May 25): Does this mean that MICA allowed in all talented and eligible American students and there were many spots left over? That in a country of 300-plus million there weren't enough Americans interested in a prestigious art institute? And no deserving citizen was turned away? Of course, it's probably like those hundreds of unwanted slots that will go to illegal immigrants under Maryland's Dream Act. Apparently college admission isn't competitive anymore and our own people have no problem getting a spot where they deserve.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2010
WASHINGTON - Americans are recovering their shrunken wealth - gradually. Household net worth rose last quarter, mainly because the healing economy boosted stock portfolios. But the gain was slight and was less than in the previous two quarters. The Federal Reserve said Thursday that net worth rose 1.3 percent in the fourth quarter to $54.2 trillion. It marked the third straight quarter of gains. Even with that increase, Americans' net worth would have to rise an additional 21 percent to get back to its pre-recession peak of $65.9 trillion.
NEWS
December 5, 2013
There's a reason foreign students do so much better on standardized test than Americans ( "America the mediocre," Dec. 3). I was listening to a story on the BBC the other day that said one reason South Korea is fifth overall in reading, math and science is that Korean students on average go to school 16 hours a day. Many log 18 hours. They can do this because there is a booming business in private, after-hours schools. Randall Miller, Ocean View, Del. - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | December 19, 2010
I would like to know if anyone still darns socks. Please call and leave your name and number at 410-332-6166. It's for a study I've launched — how many Americans darn socks in the 21st Century. Please specify if you've always been a darner or if you've taken up the craft since the Great Recession. That's important to the study. Of course, if you're of a certain age, you don't even know what I'm talking about. In downloading the Beatles' "Eleanor Rigby," you might have heard reference to Father McKenzie "darning his socks in the night when there's nobody there.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Your editorial on the Ebola virus' recent appearance in Texas perfectly expressed my fears and concerns regarding the outbreak ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2). I would add one more point that should be made: When medical officials say Ebola can only be spread via body fluids, they usually cite blood, vomit, urine and diarrhea. However, bodily fluids also include sweat and saliva, both of which are secreted daily in the most mundane ways. I strongly urge people in Dallas, where I was recently a graduate student at Southern Methodist University, to stock up on bleach-based cleansers and to refrain from unnecessarily touching their faces, especially if their hands have been in contact with objects commonly carried around in crowded public spaces, like laptops and cellphones.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case and The Baltimore Sun | October 6, 2014
Five Maryland breweries won medals at the annual Great American Beer Festival in Denver over the weekend, including Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurant in Annapolis, which won a gold medal in the "Smoke Beer" category for its Rauchbier. The festival was founded in 1982, and has grown each year, according to its official website. This year, 268 medals were awarded . The full list of Maryland winners: Gold • Category: Smoke Beer - Rauchbier (Gordon Biersch Brewery Restaurant - Annapolis)
NEWS
By Julie Stanik-Hutt, Janet Selway and Andrea Schram | October 5, 2014
In the last few weeks we've heard a lot about the Ebola epidemic and work to contain its spread and potentially tragic consequences. But influenza is a preventable infectious disease that represents a much greater risk to the health of Marylanders. Influenza (flu) is a seasonal disease that is most common in the winter and spring. Last year, almost 25,000 Marylanders sought care for flu symptoms. Anyone can get sick from the flu, but preschool age children (under 5 years of age), pregnant women and senior citizens are especially vulnerable to getting sick from influenza.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
DETROIT - Right-hander Bud Norris is now scheduled to be the Orioles' Game 3 starter on Sunday at Comerica Park.  Even though the Orioles had never officially announced a Game 3 starter, right-hander Miguel Gonzalez had been expected to pitch that game. Showalter left open wiggle room to tweak his ALDS rotation, and both pitchers were available to pitch in relief for Games 1 and 2. But Showater said that Gonzalez would have only been used in relief in case of an emergency. In the postseason, the next day's scheduled pitcher usually has a news conference with the media.
SPORTS
By Jon Meoli and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
National anthem: Soprano Chelsea Buyalos provided the second straight operatic anthem of the postseason. Ceremonial first pitch: Orioles vice president of baseball operations Brady Anderson, an American League Division Series hero in his playing career, threw the ceremonial first ball Friday. First pitch: Orioles left-hander Wei-Yin Chen threw a strike to Tigers second baseman Ian Kinsler at 12:08 p.m., one minute after the scheduled start time. It was 66 degrees and cloudy.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
Game 4 of the ALDS would start at either 12:07 p.m. or 1:37 p.m., if the ALDS series between the Kansas City Royals and Los Angeles Angels has concluded. Bud Norris would likely start that game. Norris has struggled in day games, going 11-21 with a 4.72 ERA over his career, compared to 42-36 with a 4.07 ERA at night. This season, Norris is 3-4 with a 5.57 ERA in eight day starts and 12-4 with a 2.99 ERA in 20 night starts. If necessary, Game 5 will be played on Wednesday at Camden Yards at 5:37 p.m., or 8:37 p.m. if the other ALDS series has been completed.
NEWS
October 6, 2014
Your editorial on the Ebola virus' recent appearance in Texas perfectly expressed my fears and concerns regarding the outbreak ( "Ebola hits home," Oct. 2). I would add one more point that should be made: When medical officials say Ebola can only be spread via body fluids, they usually cite blood, vomit, urine and diarrhea. However, bodily fluids also include sweat and saliva, both of which are secreted daily in the most mundane ways. I strongly urge people in Dallas, where I was recently a graduate student at Southern Methodist University, to stock up on bleach-based cleansers and to refrain from unnecessarily touching their faces, especially if their hands have been in contact with objects commonly carried around in crowded public spaces, like laptops and cellphones.
NEWS
July 1, 2011
Dan Rodricks ' recent column ("Immigrants: We detest them — and need them," June 30) unjustly slams legal immigrants and American citizens. By his column comments, it appears Mr. Rodricks does not understand there are drastic differences between Americans' attitude about legal as opposed to illegal immigration. American citizens appreciate the hard work that legal immigrants do in our country in all occupations especially those in the agricultural industry. What is not appreciated are citizens from other countries who illegally cross our borders (many with drugs tied to their back)
NEWS
By Pamela Wood and The Baltimore Sun | October 3, 2014
The workers who staff the federal government in Washington are whiter, richer, more educated and more liberal than the rest of the country, according to two political scientists at Johns Hopkins University —who warn of the potential for a troubling gap between the federal workforce and the people it serves. "It might be a problem," said Jennifer Bachner, director of the Hopkins' master's degree program in government analytics. "If the government looks very different demographically than the American people, the question is: Can they govern well?
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