Advertisement
HomeCollectionsAmerican Workers
IN THE NEWS

American Workers

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Paul Moore and Paul Moore,Public Editor | September 10, 2006
The Sun, like other newspapers, publishes dozens of articles that document and interpret economic statistics. With stories about unemployment, interest rates, consumer confidence and consumer spending, housing starts, new job creation, gross domestic product, debt levels and more, readers are inundated with information. Not every economic indicator is relevant to every reader. But in my view, recent Sun articles about three new reports have served the public well by effectively tackling core issues that affect millions of American workers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | February 12, 2014
Why has America forgotten the three most important economic lessons we learned in the 30 years following World War II? Before I answer that question, let me remind you what those lessons were: First, America's real job creators are consumers, whose rising wages generate jobs and growth. If average people don't have decent wages, there can be no real recovery and no sustained growth. In those years, business boomed because American workers were getting raises and had enough purchasing power to buy what expanding businesses had to offer.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark | January 26, 1992
Every day, 10 hours a day, David Wile hoists hundreds of boxes of alternators and windshield wipers onto the assembly line at General Motors Corp.'s Astro and Safari van plant.Last week, if the 48-year-old autoworker sat down for a minute, one of his pals down the line shouted at him: "Hey, lazy American worker! Get up!"Mr. Wile and his friends at the Broening Highway plant were joking about comments by Yoshio Sakurauchi, speaker of Japan's lower house of parliament, who last week blamed the U.S. trade deficit on American workers who "won't work hard."
NEWS
September 4, 2013
You don't have to be a Marxist to conclude that the working conditions of millions of American workers today are akin to wage-slavery ("Jobs are coming back, but they don't pay enough," Aug. 27). According to columnist Robert Reich, the shareholders of the mega-corporation that operates Taco Bell, KFC and Pizza Hut received a 15 percent return on their investment. Meanwhile, large numbers of the fast-food workers who deliver their products don't earn enough to rise above the poverty line.
NEWS
November 6, 1997
CONGRESS would grievously harm American workers, farmers, consumers, businesses and investors if it deprived President Clinton of the power to negotiate in trade arenas that Presidents Ford, Carter, Reagan, Bush and Clinton had used and needed. It would be sending him, or any successor, out to defend American interests with both hands tied behind his back.That is what the struggle to extend "fast track" negotiating authority is about. It is not about giving the president a necessary tool, but taking one away.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 20, 2013
Americans are a bunch of lazy layabouts who don't want to work and would rather live off the taxes generated by the toil of their countrymen. I hear some version of this rant repeatedly from people who believe that the American work ethic disappeared at some point in the past generation. Here on gorgeous Cape Cod, where I vacation, I've been thinking about the state of American work and workers. So let's clear up a few matters. First, American worker productivity is high and continues to rise.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 25, 2012
President Barack Obama is slamming Republican challenger Mitt Romney for heading companies that were "pioneers in outsourcing U.S. jobs," while Mr. Romney is accusing Mr. Obama of being "the real outsourcer in chief. " These are the dog days of summer, and this is the silly season of presidential campaigns. But can we get real, please? The American economy has moved way beyond outsourcing abroad or even "in-sourcing. " Most big companies headquartered in America don't send jobs overseas and don't bring jobs here from abroad.
NEWS
July 16, 1992
The manager of an Eastern Shore seafood plant sued by Mexican migrant workers who allege that he mistreated them says he did not know the workers were entitled to the federal minimum wage.Philip J. Harrington III said American workers were always paid for each pound of crab meat they picked, and not the minimum wage.He testified Tuesday in a civil lawsuit filed by 15 of the workers against the Philip J. Harrington and Son Seafood Co. in Secretary. The workers maintain they were fired after complaining about wages and working conditions.
NEWS
By Newsday | March 25, 1993
Former Secretary of Labor John T. Dunlop has been named t head a commission whose goal will be to develop a new national policy for the treatment of American workers.The 10-member Commission on the Future of Worker/Management Relations is to re-examine the 60-year-old National Labor Relations Act. Enacted in an era of labor-management warfare and a worldwide depression, the act was designed to bring peace to the American workplace and to assure the right of workers to join a union.The Dunlop commission is undertaking its mission in a more complex setting of economic recession, coupled with confusion about the future for American workers in a time of intense international competition for markets and good jobs.
NEWS
February 4, 1992
It is premature to make Kiichi Miyazawa a household name in America. He has been prime minister of Japan for three months, but may not be much longer.As Mr. Miyazawa told the Diet on Monday, his government's popularity has been hit because his friend Fumio Abe, former fund-raiser for Mr. Miyazawa's faction of the Liberal Democratic Party, was indicted Saturday on charges of having taken bribes from a property developer while regional development minister. A Socialist opponent said Mr. Miyazawa's real problem is his own unexplained connection to the Recruit Company scandal, when he stepped down as finance minister in 1988.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | August 20, 2013
Americans are a bunch of lazy layabouts who don't want to work and would rather live off the taxes generated by the toil of their countrymen. I hear some version of this rant repeatedly from people who believe that the American work ethic disappeared at some point in the past generation. Here on gorgeous Cape Cod, where I vacation, I've been thinking about the state of American work and workers. So let's clear up a few matters. First, American worker productivity is high and continues to rise.
NEWS
March 8, 2013
As someone who has made a career advocating on behalf of those that depend on Social Security Disability and Supplemental Security Income benefits, I was disheartened to read Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s column, "Disability insurance entitlement explodes under Obama" (March 3). The percentage increase in people on Social Security disability in recent years was expected, due to the aging Baby Boomers, half of whom are now reaching "high disability years. " Additionally, there has been an increase of women in the workforce in recent decades, women who are now eligible to draw on their own earnings record when they become disabled.
NEWS
By Scott Klinger | December 26, 2012
While America's CEOs are fretting about the government's so-called "fiscal cliff," millions of American workers face a financial disaster that gets much less media attention. There's a half-trillion-dollar deficit in the nation's worker retirement benefits. The Great Recession, which decimated retirement assets, played a big role in building this lesser-known cliff. But many corporations could have avoided the problem by shoring up these funds during the boom years. Instead, they siphoned pension assets for other profit-boosting purposes.
NEWS
By David Horsey | November 27, 2012
The Great American Twinkie Crisis illuminates what is wrong with the relationship between management and labor in this country. Hostess, the company that, since the 1930s, has provided our nation with snacks that are nearly indestructible, now threatens to go out of business and leave us bereft of Ding Dongs, Sno Balls, Ho Hos, CupCakes, Wonder Bread and a variety of other baked goods that are probably not good for us but, at least to a kid's palate,...
NEWS
By Michael Hayes | September 3, 2012
For more than 75 years, American workers have had legal rights to work together to improve their jobs and their workplaces. But the effectiveness of these rights has diminished over the past 30 years, and now it's questionable whether they're meaningful at all. Should those rights be revitalized, or should employment rights and policies move in a new direction for the coming years and decades? A presidential election is the perfect time to discuss, debate and ultimately decide this important question.
BUSINESS
Dan Rodricks | September 1, 2012
Mark Falcone enjoys telling people that the cutters and sewers in his factory in Westminster made 300 suits for Will Smith, Tommy Lee Jones, Josh Brolin and the numerous extras of "Men In Black III. " But, while the MIB movies might have popularized the black suit for men, mass-produced sameness is hardly English American Tailoring's thing. This company, rooted in Maryland for a century, quietly produces thousands of made-to-measure suits - in solids, pinstripes and plaids - for customers around the world.
BUSINESS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2004
The Rev. Jesse L. Jackson came to a Baltimore church packed with local hospital employees last night and called on them to invoke change and battle for workers' rights. "We've got to fight back," he told the crowd at a rally for the Service Employees International Union District 1199E-DC in Baltimore. "What is your insult level? At what point do you draw the line?" Jobs are disappearing from every state, American workers can't compete with their counterparts overseas, and there must be a renewed commitment to even the playing field for American workers, Jackson said in an interview before his talk.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 10, 2012
Supposedly, an estimated 10 percent of Americans can trace their ancestry back to the Mayflower. Not surprisingly, former President George W. Bush - son of a president, grandson of a U.S. senator, first offspring produced by the marriage of the blueblooded Bush and Walker families - is a Mayflower descendant. President Barack Obama's roots go almost that deep: He is a descendant of Thomas Blossom, who arrived in Plymouth Colony less than a decade after the Mayflower landed. America's two most recent presidents are distant cousins.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | July 25, 2012
President Barack Obama is slamming Republican challenger Mitt Romney for heading companies that were "pioneers in outsourcing U.S. jobs," while Mr. Romney is accusing Mr. Obama of being "the real outsourcer in chief. " These are the dog days of summer, and this is the silly season of presidential campaigns. But can we get real, please? The American economy has moved way beyond outsourcing abroad or even "in-sourcing. " Most big companies headquartered in America don't send jobs overseas and don't bring jobs here from abroad.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 10, 2012
Supposedly, an estimated 10 percent of Americans can trace their ancestry back to the Mayflower. Not surprisingly, former President George W. Bush - son of a president, grandson of a U.S. senator, first offspring produced by the marriage of the blueblooded Bush and Walker families - is a Mayflower descendant. President Barack Obama's roots go almost that deep: He is a descendant of Thomas Blossom, who arrived in Plymouth Colony less than a decade after the Mayflower landed. America's two most recent presidents are distant cousins.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.