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By Timothy Egan and Timothy Egan,New York Times News Service | January 18, 1993
DEVIL'S SLIDE, Utah -- This winter the American West is a stranger. From Southern California and Arizona, where nearly a year's amount of precipitation has fallen in just six weeks, to the avalanche-bruised canyons of the Rockies, the land is heavy with the scarcest of Western commodities: water.Westerners have come to expect certain things: The sun will usually shine, there is never enough water and on rare occasions the ground will move. But after nearly two months of record rainfall, smothering snow and abnormal temperatures, the first two of these defining pillars have washed away, at least for the time being.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2014
Clearly, the American League has been turned upside-down over the first half of the 2014 season. The AL West now features three of the five winningest teams in the league, and the AL East has not lived up to preseason expectations -- except in Baltimore, of course. That's why the three-city West Coast road trip that starts Friday night in Oakland will be a major test of the legitimacy of the Orioles as the top team in the AL East. The Orioles arrived at the All-Star break with a four-game lead over the second-place Toronto Blue Jays -- which is the second-biggest division lead in the major leagues -- but the first-half demise of the defending world champion Boston Red Sox and a Tampa Bay Rays team that was considered a preseason favorite has thrown into doubt the overall quality of the division.
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NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 13, 2000
From the prairie, to the Rockies and Sierras, to the Pacific, the American West has captured our imagination as no other region of our vast and beautiful country. That point will prove hard to escape when you take in "The Phelan Collection of Western Art," which is on display at the Mitchell Gallery on the campus of St. John's College in Annapolis. The collection of 50 paintings, prints, drawings and photographs from the 19th century revolves around three main themes: scenic splendor, Western settlement and Manifest Destiny's human side.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  FERRULE As you walk along the pavement, the tapping sound you make with a cane or umbrella likely comes from the ferrule  (pronounced FER-uhl or FER-ool). A ferrule is a metal ring or cap installed at the end of a stick or tube to strengthen it or prevent it from splitting.  The word comes, by a circuitous route, from the Latin ferrum , iron.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
To those who think U.S. 50 is primarily a road that spans Maryland's bucolic Eastern Shore, Christopher Corbett begs to differ. Corbett, an award-winning journalist and author, spent countless hours traversing the dusty stretch of Old U.S. 50 that lies between Salt Lake City and Reno, Nev., while researching his two books, "The Poker Bride" and "Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of The Pony Express. " Dubbed "The Loneliest Road in America" by Life Magazine in the 1980s, this remote stretch of highway is Corbett's favorite getaway destination, a place he believes is the best representation of the authentic American West.
FEATURES
By Arthur B. Hirsch and Arthur B. Hirsch,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2000
No shots are fired in anger or scalps taken in Arthur J. Phelan Jr.'s Old West. Buffalo are not hunted to near extinction; neither the frontier's westward advance nor its blue-eyed pioneers are celebrated as heroic. Phelan, raised and still living in Montgomery County, has his Old West, as Hollywood has its versions, as the National Museum of American Art's curators had theirs. For 30 years Phelan has been hunting paintings, drawings and photographs of what one authority on the subject called "a moving target": the American West.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  FERRULE As you walk along the pavement, the tapping sound you make with a cane or umbrella likely comes from the ferrule  (pronounced FER-uhl or FER-ool). A ferrule is a metal ring or cap installed at the end of a stick or tube to strengthen it or prevent it from splitting.  The word comes, by a circuitous route, from the Latin ferrum , iron.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | November 30, 1999
In the McNatt family photo album there is a picture of me as a little boy in cowboy hat and boots, toting a toy six-gun. Another shot shows me sitting on my mother's lap wearing a feathered headband and holding a bow and some arrows tipped with rubber suction cups.This was the American West of my childhood, an image nurtured by 1950s television shows like "Gunsmoke" and "The Lone Ranger," in which the vast panorama of mountain and desert existed primarily to serve as the moral arena for the struggle between good and evil.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Anthony Day and Anthony Day,Los Angeles Times | April 18, 2004
The Last Crossing, by Guy Vanderhaeghe. Atlantic Monthly Press. 394 pages. $24. The Last Crossing is a terrific novel, big, complex, gripping. Its author, Guy Vanderhaeghe, who lives in Saskatchewan and has published six previous novels and two plays, has a large following in Canada. He deserves one in the States. His subject sweeps in time from the middle of the 19th century into the early 20th and stretches in space from Victorian England and the U.S. Civil War through the American West into the Canadian West, where its heart is. In that sense, The Last Crossing is a historical novel that covers another era. But the opprobrium that some attach to the phrase "historical novel" should not apply here.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2011
Lucia St. Clair Robson's first and biggest selling novel opens with an Indian raid on a small settler outpost in 1830s East Texas — page after page of killing, scalping, torture, bondage and rape during which the 9-year-old female protagonist is carried off by the Comanches. Robson has since written about the American Revolution, and further war and occasionally other massacres in the American West, in Florida, Mexico and feudal Japan. And yet, nearly 30 years and nine published novels later, the Arnold resident is somewhat puzzled to find herself often grouped with writers of "women's novels," and even "romance novels," although she means no disrespect to these categories.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
The father-son owners of Carol's Western Wear in Glen Burnie are so attached to the legend of John Wayne that they know his boot size and preference for plain brown with a squared-off toe. They will mark the 105 t h birthday of America's well-known cowboy Saturday with a storewide sale that includes everything from alarm clocks and mugs with the Duke's image to several nearly 6-foot tall cut-outs of the actor in full-Western regalia....
NEWS
By Rob Kasper | May 15, 2012
This is a tale about Baltimore beer barons, the owner of the Washington Senators, a silver bullet, and how the Orioles got to Baltimore. Now, with the O's generating a buzz as they fight for first place in the American League East and prepare to meet the Washington Nationals for a weekend series in D.C., it seems like a good time to spin it. I heard it some years ago when Dawson Farber Jr., a former executive at National Brewing Company who died...
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 23, 2011
To those who think U.S. 50 is primarily a road that spans Maryland's bucolic Eastern Shore, Christopher Corbett begs to differ. Corbett, an award-winning journalist and author, spent countless hours traversing the dusty stretch of Old U.S. 50 that lies between Salt Lake City and Reno, Nev., while researching his two books, "The Poker Bride" and "Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of The Pony Express. " Dubbed "The Loneliest Road in America" by Life Magazine in the 1980s, this remote stretch of highway is Corbett's favorite getaway destination, a place he believes is the best representation of the authentic American West.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2011
Lucia St. Clair Robson's first and biggest selling novel opens with an Indian raid on a small settler outpost in 1830s East Texas — page after page of killing, scalping, torture, bondage and rape during which the 9-year-old female protagonist is carried off by the Comanches. Robson has since written about the American Revolution, and further war and occasionally other massacres in the American West, in Florida, Mexico and feudal Japan. And yet, nearly 30 years and nine published novels later, the Arnold resident is somewhat puzzled to find herself often grouped with writers of "women's novels," and even "romance novels," although she means no disrespect to these categories.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2010
The name of Bernard Augustine DeVoto, the distinguished historian of the American West, literary critic and author, isn't on the lips of most people these days. It's probably squadrons of graduate students in American history who annually blow the dust off his "Across the Wide Missouri," which bagged him a Pulitzer back in 1948, or his other historical efforts, "The Year of Decision: 1846" and "The Course of Empire," which keep his reputation somewhat alive. DeVoto loomed widely across the American literary scene for nearly 40 years, and for 25 of them edited "The Easy Chair" column for Harper's.
SPORTS
February 14, 2010
AL WEST Angels Starting point: 97-65, 1st (beat Red Sox in first round, lost to Yankees in ALCS). Project manager: Tony Reagins. General contractor: Mike Scioscia. Bones: The Angels scored the second most runs in the majors last season, going to the playoffs for the sixth time in Scioscia's 10 seasons as manager. New materials: RHP Fernando Rodney, DH Hideki Matsui, RHP Joel Pineiro. In the dumpster: No. 1 starter John Lackey, DH Vladimir Guerrero, 3B/leadoff Chone Figgins, OF Gary Matthews Jr., LHP Darren Oliver, RHP Jose Arredondo.
NEWS
November 17, 2000
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler, 75, the Reform movement leader who urged synagogues to accept non-Jewish spouses in a bid to preserve Jewish tradition against assimilation, died of heart failure Wednesday in Westport, Conn. In 1978, he developed the Outreach program to attract nonobservant Jews and non-Jews seeking a religious tradition. He argued that rather than excluding Jews who marry outside their faith, the Jewish community should welcome their spouses into the synagogue and encourage couples to embrace Judaism.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | March 7, 1993
Over the years American musicals have reaped the benefits (( of the sage advice: "Go West!"And in the coming months, Baltimore audiences will be able to see three prime examples of the union of the American West and the American musical -- a genre that is itself an intrinsic American art form:* "Annie Get Your Gun" -- a revival of the 1946 Irving Berlin hit, starring Cathy Rigby as Annie Oakley, begins a national tour at the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre Tuesday.*...
NEWS
By Glenn C. Altschuler and Glenn C. Altschuler,Special to the Sun | July 22, 2007
Attendant Cruelties Nation and Nationalism in American History By Patrice Higonnet Other Press / 400 pages / $25.95 When savages - in the Philippines or the American West - perform acts of bloodthirsty brutality, Theodore Roosevelt proclaimed, whites should not shrink from responding in kind: To "withdraw from the contest for civilization" because of its "attendant cruelties is, in my opinion, utterly unworthy of a great people." The Puritans would have understood the Rough Rider's "dark and dangerous" passion, Patrice Higonnet insists, and George W. Bush is the latest - and worst - in a parade of presidents who have manipulated the "historically conditioned reflections" of nationalistic exclusion.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 21, 2006
Twenty-two years ago, German director Wim Wenders and American playwright Sam Shepard collaborated on the film Paris, Texas, a muted, contemplative meditation on loss, identity and familial responsibility set in the picturesquely lonely expanses of the American Southwest. The film won the Cannes Palme d'Or, gave Harry Dean Stanton and Nastassja Kinski the roles of their careers and would emerge as one of the best, most-resonant films of the 1980s. The film was suffused with both men's love of the American West, their fascination with its vastness and its iconography.
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