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By DAN BERGER | March 1, 1995
Treasury Sec. Rubin wants to repeal hoary old regulation to enable U.S. banks to do everything Barings could.Polls show that American voters don't believe conservative Republicans any more than liberal Democrats.Key Democrats are willing to enact the balanced budget amendment as long as it is judicially unenforceable.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | October 21, 2012
Whether the issue is gay marriage, Vegas-style gambling or college for illegal immigrants, all of Maryland's ballot campaigns have this in common: They are lavishing attention on black voters. African-Americans are expected to be fully a quarter of the Maryland electorate this year, a surge in participation attributed to robust support for President Barack Obama. Their sheer numbers make them important as Maryland, for the first time in decades, faces a trio of major ballot questions.
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NEWS
By DAN BERGER | July 25, 1994
A Western world that will not prevent the death of a people in Bosnia cannot do so in Rwanda.Politicians on all sides are adapting Vietnam war strategy to health care: Declare victory and go home.Another Bawlmer anchor person is paid huge amounts not to appear on television. If only they could all be so engaged simultaneously. . .Bill wants to convince the Haitian dictator that the U.S. will invade and American voters that it won't, but all he achieves is the other way round.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
If 47 percent of American voters weren't in the bag for President Barack Obama before, they certainly are now. The video of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney writing off nearly half of the American population as layabouts with no feeling of personal responsibility, a victimhood complex and an addiction to government services may hit a new high-water mark for self-inflicted wounds in an electoral campaign, not just because it was insulting but...
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder Newspapers | April 21, 1992
DALLAS -- Texas billionaire Ross Perot reports that he has spent more than $400,000 to land his name on the ballot.Indeed, most of the money behind the Perot Petition Committee comes from Mr. Perot himself, according to filings with the Federal Election Commission.The FEC requires any potential candidate who has spent more than $5,000 to disclose the sources and uses of contributions."It is not a campaign," Thomas H. Luce, Mr. Perot's lawyer and adviser, said yesterday. "The only organization that exists is the one that is helping volunteers in the field."
NEWS
May 19, 1996
The Sun's May 12 editorial involving the government of India contributing $46,000 to candidates in U.S. elections makes a good point.While India should not be giving money to American politicians (apparently it would have been OK for India to hire lobbyists), we Americans should share their blame, because we tolerate a political system that seems to invite such contributions.Your editorial, however, fails to mention that the United States' government, usually acting covertly through the CIA, spends immense amounts of our tax money trying to influence the outcome of elections all over the world.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith and C. Fraser Smith,Staff Writer | September 30, 1992
The Maryland Republican Party opened a bid for support among black voters yesterday by announcing formation of an African American Steering Committee."
NEWS
November 9, 2000
NEVER BEFORE have American voters been so evenly split. Or so many important elections decided by a narrow number of votes: A new Congress with Republicans holding a razor-thin margin in each chamber. A presidential election that comes down to one state -- Florida -- and a difference of a few thousand votes. Florida officials hope to conclude their recount later today, but if Al Gore and George W. Bush remain so close in their vote totals, we may not know who the next president will be until mail-in ballots from Floridians overseas are received over the next week or so. It's that tight.
NEWS
January 17, 2008
Of course Michiganders, of all people, would be worried about the economy, but no American state or region is immune from the woes that are threatening to make 2008 a penny-pinched year. Mitt Romney won a clear victory in Michigan's Republican primary Tuesday, and though some of that had to do with his being the son of a favorite son, he garnered strong support from those who said the economy was the most pressing issue. Among that group, he won 42 percent to 55 percent of those voting, according to exit polls.
NEWS
January 3, 2008
Surely no one would set out to create the absurd presidential nomination process that finally gets under way today with the Iowa caucuses. Yet the surrogates standing in there and in New Hampshire next week for the vast majority of American voters who won't have direct contact with candidates have done a good job of separating the corn from the husk while probably not signaling the final choice. In fact, both Republican and Democratic contests are so close, odds are the competition will continue in earnest for at least a few more weeks - maybe not until Maryland votes on Feb. 12, but longer than usual.
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 11, 2012
In his speech accepting the presidential nomination at the Democratic National Convention, Barack Obama neatly transformed the hope and change of 2008 that centered on him into a voter-centered hope and change for 2012. "So you see, the election four years ago wasn't about me," the president said. "It was about you. My fellow citizens -- you were the change. "You're the reason there's a little girl with a heart disorder in Phoenix who'll get the surgery she needs because an insurance company can't limit her coverage.
NEWS
September 7, 2012
While I agree that how President Obama (or any president) might respond to an Israeli military strike in Iran is an important topic for any voter to consider, including Jewish voters, former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich's rambling discussion of the topic is way off the mark ("Can Jews be sure of Obama's commitment to Israel," Sept. 2). He seems of touch with most American Jewish voters. To suggest that Jewish citizens vote Democrat out of "habit" is insulting. Jewish voters are not one-issue voters (i.e.
NEWS
December 18, 2011
Paul Schurick was recently found guilty for election fraud, but this is not the first time such activities have occurred in Maryland elections, and, unfortunately, it's probably not the last ("Schurick guilty of election fraud in robocall case," Dec. 6). What is a fair sentence, one that respects both the franchise rights of voters and discourages such activities from taking place again? Some have suggested Mr. Schurick will be sentenced to a suspended jail term and put on probation.
NEWS
By KATHLEEN PARKER | May 15, 2008
WASHINGTON - "A full-blooded American." That's how 24-year-old Josh Fry of West Virginia described his preference for Sen. John McCain over Sen. Barack Obama. His feelings aren't racist, he explained. He would just be more comfortable with "someone who is a full-blooded American as president." Whether Mr. Fry was referring to Mr. McCain's military service or Mr. Obama's Kenyan father isn't clear, but he may have hit upon something essential in this presidential race. Full-bloodedness is an old coin that's gaining currency in the new American realm.
NEWS
January 17, 2008
Of course Michiganders, of all people, would be worried about the economy, but no American state or region is immune from the woes that are threatening to make 2008 a penny-pinched year. Mitt Romney won a clear victory in Michigan's Republican primary Tuesday, and though some of that had to do with his being the son of a favorite son, he garnered strong support from those who said the economy was the most pressing issue. Among that group, he won 42 percent to 55 percent of those voting, according to exit polls.
NEWS
January 3, 2008
Surely no one would set out to create the absurd presidential nomination process that finally gets under way today with the Iowa caucuses. Yet the surrogates standing in there and in New Hampshire next week for the vast majority of American voters who won't have direct contact with candidates have done a good job of separating the corn from the husk while probably not signaling the final choice. In fact, both Republican and Democratic contests are so close, odds are the competition will continue in earnest for at least a few more weeks - maybe not until Maryland votes on Feb. 12, but longer than usual.
NEWS
September 18, 2012
If 47 percent of American voters weren't in the bag for President Barack Obama before, they certainly are now. The video of Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney writing off nearly half of the American population as layabouts with no feeling of personal responsibility, a victimhood complex and an addiction to government services may hit a new high-water mark for self-inflicted wounds in an electoral campaign, not just because it was insulting but...
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun Staff Correspondent Sun staff writer Dan Fesperman contributed to this article | July 12, 1994
BERLIN -- Al Gore, take heed. It was the Bill and Helmut show as President Clinton and Chancellor Helmut Kohl crisscrossed Germany yesterday, looking and sounding for all the world like a couple of political running mates.In the United States, many Democratic senators and congressmen are putting all the distance they can between themselves and their party's president. They can read the polls, which show Mr. Clinton getting negative ratings overall from American voters for his handling of his job.It's an ironic role for Mr. Clinton, the domestic president whose growing involvement in foreign policy rubs American voters the wrong way. But he took to it yesterday with practiced ease.
NEWS
By Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown and Jennifer Skalka and Matthew Hay Brown,sun reporters | August 30, 2006
Less than two weeks before the Democratic primary for the U.S. Senate, the campaign of former Congressman Kweisi Mfume has scored endorsements from Maryland's two black congressmen - nods that could help boost crucial turnout among African-American voters. But Mfume's chief rival for the nomination, U.S. Rep. Benjamin L. Cardin, is not ceding the black vote to the former NAACP president. U.S. HOUSE: Republican Rick Hoover is running in the 3rd District. pg 5B
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | January 3, 2005
WASHINGTON - Good riddance to 2004. It seems grimly ironic that a huge natural disaster should hit South Asia at year's end, dwarfing all that went before it in 2004 and putting in perspective the problems that beset this country over the previous 366 days of a dismaying leap year. The loss of tens of thousands of souls in the earthquake and tsunami that followed in one sense vastly overshadows the deaths of more than 1,300 U.S. troops in Iraq. Except the latter were not incurred at the hand of nature, but in a war of choice begun under false premises.
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