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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 11, 2005
. American University's board of trustees dismissed its president, Benjamin Ladner, last night, accusing him of misusing more than $500,000 in university money since 2002. After deliberating nearly eight hours, the board resolved a conflict that has roiled the campus in Northwest Washington since March, when an anonymous letter to board members said Ladner had been lavishly spending university money on himself and his wife, Nancy, for many years. The letter sparked a controversy that angered many student and faculty groups, led to Ladner's suspension in August and split the 24-member board.
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NEWS
By David Driver | March 17, 2014
Charlie Jones sat on a couch in the front row with his teammates during a selection show party on Sunday evening at American University. A resident of Manchester in Carroll County, freshman swingman Jones was wearing a light gray sweatsuit and to his left were star point guard Darius Gardner and coach Mike Brennan. At about 6:20 p.m., the CBS selection show announced that American, the Patriot League champions, were the No. 15 seed in the West Regional for March Madness and would face No. 2 seed Wisconsin on Thursday in Milwaukee for the Eagles' first tournament appearance in five years.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine | October 22, 1998
There's nothing new about playing up the contrast between warm flesh and cold machinery, but few bands have done it as deftly as Garbage does. In the studio, the quartet makes excellent drama out of the textural differences between Shirley Manson's throaty sensuality and the electronic precision of the band's processed-and-programmed guitars, drums and samplers. That approach has earned the quartet a passel of alternarock hits, including "Only Happy When It Rains," "Stupid Girl," "Push It" and "I Think I'm Paranoid."
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | March 4, 2014
Beyond the characters, writing and wardrobes, the reason I most enjoy AMC's superb television series "Mad Men" is that it disabuses Americans - whether or not they old enough to remember the nation as it really was 50 years ago - of the false conceit that the United States was pure and idyllic prior to the civil rights, feminist and environmental revolutions. In the show, men routinely grope women at the office; black bellhops and elevator operators are treated like curios, or worse; Don and Betty Draper finish a picnic by lifting their blanket and strewing trash across a public park.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 25, 1991
WASHINGTON -- When Richard Berendzen had dinner recently with three faculty members from the college he presided over for 10 years, the former American University president talked about black holes, extra-terrestrial life and the cosmos -- other-worldly topics he reveled in as a one-time professor of astronomy.But, quickly, the conversation turned to the world he knew and loved best until the spring of 1990 -- the university stratosphere from which he descended abruptly after having been discovered making obscene telephone calls.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The disagreement between Mary Ellen Barbera and Glenn T. Harrell Jr. made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, but that didn't stop them from meeting for lunch in Washington after oral arguments in the case. Barbera and Harrell, both judges on Maryland's highest court, were on opposite sides of a hard-fought case over the collection of DNA from suspects arrested for violent crimes. Harrell wrote the majority opinion striking down the practice; Barbera criticized his reasoning in a dissent.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Sanford J. Ungar, the president of Goucher College, plans to resign next summer after 13 years at the head of the Towson school, according to a letter circulated to faculty, staff and students Friday. The letter, addressed to board of trustees chairwoman Norma Lynn Fox, offered no reason for Ungar's decision but noted the "many political, financial, and curricular challenges" liberal arts colleges are facing. "I believe Goucher is well-positioned to deal with these issues, but I also feel it is time for the college to seek a new leader who can bring his or her own experience and perspective to bear and move this remarkable institution forward," Ungar wrote.
NEWS
By Andrew Ratner and Stacey Hirsh and Andrew Ratner and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | August 26, 2002
Joseph D. Duffey walked into the DC Coast, a popular restaurant in Washington where a constant stock ticker beamed the latest from Bloomberg and CNN. This was 3 1/2 years ago, when everyone at the bar glanced at the ticker every minute or two because the stock prices jumped one way - up. Duffey was there to meet Douglas L. Becker, who wanted to recruit Duffey for his company in Baltimore, Sylvan Learning Systems Inc. Duffey qualified as a capital insider....
FEATURES
By Ronnell M. Maybank | June 18, 1995
Student's TV script is most wanted by Fox showMartin Brandwin will get more than just an "A" on his class assignment. He will get his chance at stardom on network television.The Fox network (WBFF -- Channel 45) will use Mr. Brandwin's script for an episode of "America's Most Wanted" scheduled to air July 15.Mr. Brandwin and his 14 classmates at American University were assigned to develop two parts of a three-part script highlighting an actual crime that had been researched by a reporter for the show.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1999
Ralph Chandler John, who served as president of Western Maryland College from 1972 to 1984, died Nov. 25 of a hemorrhage at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 80 and lived in Berlin. A Methodist minister, he guided the Westminster liberal arts college through a period when its enrollment nearly doubled. The school was approved for a Phi Beta Kappa chapter, and it earned acclaim for its graduate program that trains teachers of deaf students. Under his direction, the college launched its first graduate degree program in the liberal arts.
NEWS
February 14, 2014
Sunday, Feb. 16 Concert The Performing Arts Association of Linthicum presents the Anne Arundel Community College Symphony Orchestra and the Chamber Singers in a "Salute to the Pops" at 3 p.m. at the Chesapeake Arts Center, 194 Hammonds Lane in Brooklyn Park. The program includes selections from Franz Lehar's "The Merry Widow. " Tickets are $27, free for students accompanied by a paying adult or PAAL member. Information: 410-691-9725 or paalconcerts.org. Tuesday, Feb. 18 Environmental meeting Monthly meeting of the Severn River Association will be held at 7 p.m. in the Maryland Department of Natural Resources' ground-floor conference room, 580 Taylor Ave. in Annapolis.
SPORTS
By Alexander Pyles and The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2013
Jack Mutchnik, a three-time Maryland Interscholastic Athletic Association champion wrestler and National Prep champion at St. Paul's, has committed to wrestle at American University next year. A senior at St. Paul's, Mutchnik went 47-5 last season and is 140-26 in his high school career. He was an All-Metro first-team selection at 126 pounds last year, when he became St. Paul's first national champion in 31 years. Mutchnik also won MIAA A Conference and Maryland Independent Schools state titles last year.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
The disagreement between Mary Ellen Barbera and Glenn T. Harrell Jr. made it all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, but that didn't stop them from meeting for lunch in Washington after oral arguments in the case. Barbera and Harrell, both judges on Maryland's highest court, were on opposite sides of a hard-fought case over the collection of DNA from suspects arrested for violent crimes. Harrell wrote the majority opinion striking down the practice; Barbera criticized his reasoning in a dissent.
NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | June 29, 2013
Sanford J. Ungar, the president of Goucher College, plans to resign next summer after 13 years at the head of the Towson school, according to a letter circulated to faculty, staff and students Friday. The letter, addressed to board of trustees chairwoman Norma Lynn Fox, offered no reason for Ungar's decision but noted the "many political, financial, and curricular challenges" liberal arts colleges are facing. "I believe Goucher is well-positioned to deal with these issues, but I also feel it is time for the college to seek a new leader who can bring his or her own experience and perspective to bear and move this remarkable institution forward," Ungar wrote.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | November 6, 2012
Filmmaker Oliver Stone will be in Baltimore Thursday, screening his new documentary and fielding questions about it. "Oliver Stone's Untold History of the United States," a series that re-examines American foreign policy, is now airing on Showtime. Stone was lured to Baltimore because the documentary's key researcher is University of Baltimore historian Eric Singer. The 10-part documentary that delves into everything from the Cold War to the fall of Communism, to Vietnam and terrorism, is getting a lot of buzz in history circles -- even actor John Cusack, who saw it the other day, called it "really excellent," tweeting: "Stone's new doc series is measured powerful and serious - if not the untold at least the largely ignored history of crucial periods.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2012
Stanley Harrison, a communications and writing teacher who edited a scholarly journal about H.L. Mencken, died of cardiac arrest after a stroke April 5 at the home of a friend in Miami Beach, Fla. He was 81 and lived in Florida and Woodbine. Born in East Orange, N.J., and raised in Baltimore, he graduated from City College's night school. He received a bachelor's degree in political science at the University of Maryland, College Park, where he also earned a master's. He received a doctoral degree in government and public administration from American University in Washington.
NEWS
October 9, 2007
On July 9, 2007, D. GENE WILLE, 75, of The Villages, FL. Born October 20, 1931 in Baltimore, MD. He was a graduate of Penn State University, followed with his MBA at American University. Gene lived most of his life in Maryland. He retired from the National Security Agency as a cryptology group manager. He served his country and was a proud reservist retired Captain for the US Navy and continued as a Captain in the Reserve until his death. He is survived by his wife Joan, sons, Bob, Jim, daughter, Cindy, 4 grandchildren, and a brother Carroll.
NEWS
December 9, 1991
Rodney Walter Dennis, a Baltimore native and an administrator at American University in Washington, died Wednesday of pneumonia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 39 and lived in Washington.Services were being held today at City Temple of Baltimore Baptist Church, Eutaw and Dolphin streets.Since 1988, Dr. Dennis had been educational director for Return-to-School programs at American University. He worked to create links between the university and black churches in the District of Columbia and helped develop the Metropolitan Baptist Church-American University scholarship program for adults.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,SUN REPORTER | March 11, 2008
When asked yesterday what advice he would give his successor as president of the Johns Hopkins University, Dr. William R. Brody quipped: "Don't screw it up." He was quoting New York Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg, perhaps Hopkins' most famous living alumnus and a generous donor. Bloomberg recalls the quote rather differently - "I probably said it a little more vulgar than that," he said - but the words of wisdom might be apt for anyone taking the helm at an American university. Hopkins officials are about to begin a national search to replace Brody, who announced yesterday that he will retire in December after 12 years as president.
NEWS
October 9, 2007
On July 9, 2007, D. GENE WILLE, 75, of The Villages, FL. Born October 20, 1931 in Baltimore, MD. He was a graduate of Penn State University, followed with his MBA at American University. Gene lived most of his life in Maryland. He retired from the National Security Agency as a cryptology group manager. He served his country and was a proud reservist retired Captain for the US Navy and continued as a Captain in the Reserve until his death. He is survived by his wife Joan, sons, Bob, Jim, daughter, Cindy, 4 grandchildren, and a brother Carroll.
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