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By THOMAS SOWELL | July 13, 2006
The same newspapers and television news programs that are constantly reminding us that some people under indictment "are innocent until proved guilty" are nevertheless hyping the story of American troops accused of rape in Iraq, day in and day out, even though these troops have yet to be proved guilty of anything. What about all the civilian rapes that are charged - and even proved - in the United States? None of them gets this 24/7 coverage in the mainstream media. Unfortunately, this is not an isolated example of media hype of unproven charges against U.S. troops.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | June 21, 2014
George W. Bush never claimed to be prescient, but here he is in 2007, warning us what would happen if the United States prematurely pulled its troops out of Iraq before Iraqi forces were sufficiently trained, equipped and motivated to defend the country we gave back to them after the ouster of Saddam Hussein: "To begin withdrawing before our commanders tell us we're ready would be dangerous for Iraq, for the region and for the United States....
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NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | March 7, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Pollster John Zogby says he has been asked by senior military brass to give a presentation at the U.S. Central Command in Florida about his firm's recent poll of American troops in Iraq. Good. The troops have said things their commanders need to hear - including their commander in chief. Among them: 23 percent of the troops surveyed said they want to stay "as long as they are needed," President Bush's often-stated policy. Seventy-two percent of the respondents said the United States should leave Iraq within the next year, and that included a 29 percent minority who said the United States should pull out of Iraq "immediately."
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | December 8, 2013
Critical analysis of Obama administration foreign policy is rendered more difficult by America's neo-isolationist mood. The bloody conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan have left most Americans in no mood for further military engagements, particularly in regions long known for their tribal and sectarian strife. The angst is spread far beyond the anti-war left, too. Middle America 's sons and daughters have witnessed enough carnage to make future adventurism a dubious proposition.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 2008
BAGHDAD - Iraq's Cabinet overwhelmingly approved a proposed security agreement yesterday that calls for a full withdrawal of American forces from the country by the end of 2011. The Cabinet's decision brings a final date for the departure of American troops a significant step closer after more than five years of war. The proposed agreement must be approved by Iraq's parliament, in a vote scheduled to take place in a week. But leaders of some of the largest parliamentary blocs expressed confidence that with the backing of most Shiites and Kurds they had enough support to ensure its approval.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 2002
BAGRAM AIR BASE, Afghanistan - American Special Forces troops mistakenly fired on a group of friendly Afghan soldiers in eastern Afghanistan yesterday, killing three men and wounding two others they mistook for al-Qaida fighters, American military officials said. The brief battle occurred near the town of Gardez in a mountainous region where more than 300 British Royal Marines and scores of coalition forces are hunting for bands of al-Qaida and Taliban fighters who seem to move with impunity across the loosely guarded border with Pakistan.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Alisa Samuels and Nancy Lawson and Melody Simmons and Alisa Samuels and Nancy Lawson,Evening Sun Staff | March 4, 1991
Gray skies and a steady drizzle failed to -- spirits throughout the metropolitan area as yellow ribbons, flags and prayers of thanksgiving flowed at a series of rallies held in support of American troops in the Persian Gulf.At Joseph Rash Memorial Field in the Inner Harbor yesterday, about 500 people heard Delores Lynn sing the national anthem.In Baltimore County, about 1,000 people waved flags, ate cupcakes and hot dogs and bought posters and T-shirts at Cox Park in Essex. And 75 people gathered in the parking lot of the Old Court Metro Station in Pikesville to listen to speeches and songs.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | October 12, 2001
KARSHI, Uzbekistan - A Pentagon official said yesterday that U.S. troops being sent to Uzbekistan are intended for combat use, despite public assurances that they aren't. Uzbekistan has declared that it will allow on its soil only those troops on humanitarian or search-and-rescue missions. Neither U.S. nor Uzbek officials will say if that limitation is being lifted - either publicly or perhaps tacitly - to allow the troops to engage in the direct combat expected to start soon. The U.S. Embassy in Tashkent, Uzbekistan's capital, refuses to discuss specifics of the U.S. military mission here.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 31, 2003
DIWANIYAH, Iraq - The farmer wore a nervous grin as a long line of amphibious assault vehicles, Humvees and trucks rumbled onto his property early yesterday morning. The American officer was polite but suspicious. Each wondered: Who was friend and who was foe? "We have no problem with you being here," Salman Hasham offered, speaking through a translator to a Marine intelligence officer, "but we have women and children here. They are scared to death." The officer peppered Hasham and his neighbors with questions about their families before apologizing for the intrusion and offering them a promise: "We'll try to let you get on with your lives."
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 16, 2011
- When President Barack Obama went to Fort Bragg the other day to proclaim the end of the nearly nine-year war in Iraq, it was hardly what you would call a traditional victory lap. There was no wild V-I Day to match the V-E and V-J Days that kicked off nationwide jubilation at the end of World War II. The most Mr. Obama could proclaim was that America wished a "welcome home" to the last of the 1.5 million American troops who had served in...
NEWS
By Doyle McManus | July 19, 2012
Here's an important fact you haven't heard much about in the presidential campaign: The armed forces of the United States are at war in at least four countries, and that number could increase any day. About 87,000 Americans are still fighting in Afghanistan, and some are likely to stay past 2014. We're at war in neighboring Pakistan too, mostly using unmanned drones but with a handful of people on the ground. U.S. drone and special operations forces are also waging attacks in Yemen and Somalia, operations big enough that President Barack Obama felt compelled to acknowledge them publicly last month in a letter to Congress.
NEWS
June 5, 2012
President Barack Obama paid tribute on Memorial Day to the men and women who have died defending America, singling out Vietnam veterans as an under-appreciated and sometimes maligned group of war heroes, vowing that "it will not happen again. " This is truly disgracefully pandering for votes among families of fallen American troops. This is no doubt a new low for Mr. Obama. Marking Memorial Day at both the Vietnam War Memorial and earlier at Arlington National Cemetery across the Potomac River from the capital, President Obama noted that for the first time in nine years, "Americans are not fighting and dying in Iraq," and the nation was winding down its role in the conflict in Afghanistan.
NEWS
June 2, 2012
The more I read about Afghanistan, the more concerned I become about the contending factions faced by President Hamid Karzai's government and the American forces trying to support it. We have spent $471 million to complete the Afghanistan Dam project, begun in the early 1950s to provide electricity, and the $6 billion we have spent over the past decade to combat the opium trade has helped finance the insurgency and fueled government corruption....
NEWS
March 12, 2012
The bloody mayhem allegedly committed by a U.S. soldier in Afghanistan Sunday couldn't have come at a worse time. The killings, which left up to 16 Afghan civilians dead, are likely to inflame an already tense situation fueled by growing Afghan resentment over the presence of U.S. and NATO troops in their country. Recent weeks have seen an upsurge in anti-American protests erupting into violence againstU.S. military and diplomatic personnel. American officials need to find out the circumstances of the latest killings as quickly as possible and make the results public.
NEWS
January 15, 2012
Regarding your recent article about the continuing violence in Iraq, it's disturbing that it and many similar pieces all followed President Obama's Dec. 2010 announcement that all American troops would be withdrawn from Iraq by the end of 2011 ("Blasts targeting pilgrims kill 15, injure 52 in Iraq," Jan.10). It's quite obvious that the president's action was nothing more than a political ploy to position himself in a more favorable position for re-election in 2012. Unfortunately, Mr. Obama's announcement also created the chaotic situation the articles describe.
NEWS
December 20, 2011
This week, the last U.S. combat troops left Iraq. After more than eight years of fighting an ill-conceived, inexcusably prolonged war made more devastating by official ineptitude and hubris, America's soldiers are coming home for Christmas. The nation that welcomes them back honors their sacrifice and the courage with which they served their country. Yet it may be years before we can fully assess the sacrifice our men and women in uniform made during America's longest and most unpopular war since Vietnam.
NEWS
February 17, 1993
Most Americans want to see American troops leave Somalia -- their job well done -- soon. Most Americans also want American troops on any operation to be under American command. Yet the two desires are in conflict. One must be sacrificed to achieve the other.Although American troops have served in NATO exercises under allied commanders, a quiet principle of the Pentagon since World War II is that American operations in anger are American-commanded. It is a principle from which the U.S. is going to have to back down if it wants to see increased use of United Nations commands in tackling regional problems.
NEWS
April 29, 2007
The top U.S. commander in Iraq, speaking Thursday as Congress prepared to send President Bush legislation that would set a date next year for the start of withdrawal of American troops. ?I wouldn't try to truly anticipate what [the troop] level might be some years down the road. ? It is an endeavor that clearly is going to require enormous commitment and commitment over time.? Gen. David Petraeus
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 16, 2011
- When President Barack Obama went to Fort Bragg the other day to proclaim the end of the nearly nine-year war in Iraq, it was hardly what you would call a traditional victory lap. There was no wild V-I Day to match the V-E and V-J Days that kicked off nationwide jubilation at the end of World War II. The most Mr. Obama could proclaim was that America wished a "welcome home" to the last of the 1.5 million American troops who had served in...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | November 17, 2008
BAGHDAD - Iraq's Cabinet overwhelmingly approved a proposed security agreement yesterday that calls for a full withdrawal of American forces from the country by the end of 2011. The Cabinet's decision brings a final date for the departure of American troops a significant step closer after more than five years of war. The proposed agreement must be approved by Iraq's parliament, in a vote scheduled to take place in a week. But leaders of some of the largest parliamentary blocs expressed confidence that with the backing of most Shiites and Kurds they had enough support to ensure its approval.
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