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NEWS
June 10, 2005
JIMMY CARTER'S call to dissolve the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is a welcome addition to the chorus. President Bush should do more than consider the idea, as he said on Wednesday he was doing; he should shut the doors on this ill-advised experiment. The American detention facility for foreigners picked up by U.S. troops in Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere is not a "gulag," as an Amnesty International report unfortunately put it. It also is not a prisoner of war camp, according to the administration, which has not followed the standards of the Geneva Conventions in its treatment of those held there.
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NEWS
By Xiaohui Wu | August 3, 2014
As a foreigner in the United States, one question I've often been asked by newly-met friends has been "What do you find special about America?" I always have a good answer for that question: "Education. " American children have colorful lives while their Chinese peers are locked up in studies. Surprisingly, many of my American friends are not as optimistic about the American system. In fact, they've told me it's the U.S. education system that's problematic and perhaps should learn from the Chinese system.
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NEWS
November 28, 2013
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s suggestion that "the transformative promises of the British Labor Party in 1945 are remarkably similar to progressives' promises of today" is a stretch way too far from reality, even when wrapped up in Winston Churchill's halo ( "The challenges Churchill faced nearly 70 years ago mirror those of today," Nov. 24). The last time I looked, American progressives were not advocating the nationalization of coal, utilities, steel and transportation, as the Labor government did after World War II. And the UK's National Health Service bears little resemblance to the Affordable Care Act. The NHS is a single-payer system that avoids the byzantine nonsense that has been foisted on the American people in the name of compromise.
NEWS
November 28, 2013
Columnist Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s suggestion that "the transformative promises of the British Labor Party in 1945 are remarkably similar to progressives' promises of today" is a stretch way too far from reality, even when wrapped up in Winston Churchill's halo ( "The challenges Churchill faced nearly 70 years ago mirror those of today," Nov. 24). The last time I looked, American progressives were not advocating the nationalization of coal, utilities, steel and transportation, as the Labor government did after World War II. And the UK's National Health Service bears little resemblance to the Affordable Care Act. The NHS is a single-payer system that avoids the byzantine nonsense that has been foisted on the American people in the name of compromise.
NEWS
By Xiaohui Wu | August 3, 2014
As a foreigner in the United States, one question I've often been asked by newly-met friends has been "What do you find special about America?" I always have a good answer for that question: "Education. " American children have colorful lives while their Chinese peers are locked up in studies. Surprisingly, many of my American friends are not as optimistic about the American system. In fact, they've told me it's the U.S. education system that's problematic and perhaps should learn from the Chinese system.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | October 28, 1992
Los Angeles. -- As I scanned the channels trying to get away from the twang und drang of Ross Perot, I toted up the reasons I would not vote for the man even if he brought the money to my door.1. I love my country.2. He reminds me of Napoleon.3. I don't like self-financed politics, which means, to me, government of the super-rich, by the super-rich -- and, soon enough, for only the super-rich.4. I don't like the fact that buying public office is no longer a problem of the American system -- now it is the system.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
The simplest game has gotten awfully complicated.Leon Mach got turned on to soccer in the early 1960s. He wasn't formally introduced to the game until he was 9, and then didn't play more than 20 games a year, but he touched the ball seven times a week in the pickup games that were a daily ritual on the east side of Baltimore.It wasn't fancy, but it was fertile, since a club or college coach could drive Eastern Avenue from Patterson Park to Sparrows Point -- with a detour down Dundalk Avenue -- and put together several national-class teams.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
The Dominique Strauss-Kahn drama will no doubt give many in France immense pleasure that the American legal system has met its comeuppance with a case that has completely unraveled against their French lothario. It appears all charges against Mr. Strauss-Kahn will be dropped. Even at its inception, this case was headed for the klieg lights with the pursuit of justice taking a back seat to the pursuit of publicity. It appeared that the prosecutor in the case, Cyrus Vance, seized this sordid occurrence as an opportunity to advance himself on the international stage.
NEWS
By WILEY HALL | August 1, 1995
In Baltimore last week, a predominantly African-American jury acquitted a young African-American man of the murder of a young Korean-American student -- even though the evidence seemed to point overwhelmingly to the defendant's guilt.Moreover, the defense lawyer in the case said he had approached prosecutors about the possibility of a plea bargain. But the victim's family asked the prosecution to reject any such proposal.The verdict quickly attracted national attention for two reasons: It seems to illustrate the presence of anti-Korean bigotry among some in the black community, and it reinforces our eroding confidence in America's jury system.
NEWS
By Charles Levendosky | December 3, 1997
THE ANTI-TERRORISM act that President Clinton signed last year allows an immigrant accused of being part of or associating with a terrorist group to be deported without being told what evidence the government has against him. The evidence -- if it is evidence and not rumor -- remains secret.The accused cannot see the documents or testimony that condemns him, nor may the accused know where the material originates. It is impossible to refute what you cannot see and cannot question.We would do well to remember the lesson in our history and those who were our earliest immigrants.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
The Dominique Strauss-Kahn drama will no doubt give many in France immense pleasure that the American legal system has met its comeuppance with a case that has completely unraveled against their French lothario. It appears all charges against Mr. Strauss-Kahn will be dropped. Even at its inception, this case was headed for the klieg lights with the pursuit of justice taking a back seat to the pursuit of publicity. It appeared that the prosecutor in the case, Cyrus Vance, seized this sordid occurrence as an opportunity to advance himself on the international stage.
NEWS
June 10, 2005
JIMMY CARTER'S call to dissolve the U.S. prison at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, is a welcome addition to the chorus. President Bush should do more than consider the idea, as he said on Wednesday he was doing; he should shut the doors on this ill-advised experiment. The American detention facility for foreigners picked up by U.S. troops in Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere is not a "gulag," as an Amnesty International report unfortunately put it. It also is not a prisoner of war camp, according to the administration, which has not followed the standards of the Geneva Conventions in its treatment of those held there.
NEWS
By Charles Levendosky | December 3, 1997
THE ANTI-TERRORISM act that President Clinton signed last year allows an immigrant accused of being part of or associating with a terrorist group to be deported without being told what evidence the government has against him. The evidence -- if it is evidence and not rumor -- remains secret.The accused cannot see the documents or testimony that condemns him, nor may the accused know where the material originates. It is impossible to refute what you cannot see and cannot question.We would do well to remember the lesson in our history and those who were our earliest immigrants.
NEWS
By WILEY HALL | August 1, 1995
In Baltimore last week, a predominantly African-American jury acquitted a young African-American man of the murder of a young Korean-American student -- even though the evidence seemed to point overwhelmingly to the defendant's guilt.Moreover, the defense lawyer in the case said he had approached prosecutors about the possibility of a plea bargain. But the victim's family asked the prosecution to reject any such proposal.The verdict quickly attracted national attention for two reasons: It seems to illustrate the presence of anti-Korean bigotry among some in the black community, and it reinforces our eroding confidence in America's jury system.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
The simplest game has gotten awfully complicated.Leon Mach got turned on to soccer in the early 1960s. He wasn't formally introduced to the game until he was 9, and then didn't play more than 20 games a year, but he touched the ball seven times a week in the pickup games that were a daily ritual on the east side of Baltimore.It wasn't fancy, but it was fertile, since a club or college coach could drive Eastern Avenue from Patterson Park to Sparrows Point -- with a detour down Dundalk Avenue -- and put together several national-class teams.
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | October 28, 1992
Los Angeles. -- As I scanned the channels trying to get away from the twang und drang of Ross Perot, I toted up the reasons I would not vote for the man even if he brought the money to my door.1. I love my country.2. He reminds me of Napoleon.3. I don't like self-financed politics, which means, to me, government of the super-rich, by the super-rich -- and, soon enough, for only the super-rich.4. I don't like the fact that buying public office is no longer a problem of the American system -- now it is the system.
NEWS
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | April 17, 1998
Sharon Fenick first heard the figure of speech "rule of thumb" cited as a sexist pejorative during her freshman year at Harvard seven years ago.The phrase was invoked in a lecture as an example of domestic abuse permitted by British common law. The rule of thumb, according to the professor, was a law that allowed a man to beat his wife so long as the rod used was no thicker than his thumb. But over the centuries, the term had evolved into vernacular for an "approximate measure.""It sounded very believable to me," says the 24-year-old Fenick, now in her third year of law school at the University of Chicago.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | July 9, 2010
By now, anybody with a pulse is well aware that Barack Obama is not what he said he was when seeking our votes for president. He's not a conciliator, he's an ideologue. His "transformative" presidency is one seeking to transform the American system into a European-style social democracy, with the emphasis on "social." His overarching goal — judging from his actions — is to further expand an already stifling federal bureaucracy into such a monolith that private activity will be unable to escape its control.
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