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By Robert Taylor and Robert Taylor,Boston Globe | July 5, 1994
"In 1938," Daniel Aaron recalls, "at the end of the final examination of English 7 (I was a teaching assistant at Harvard College), John F. Kennedy rather loftily, I thought, slapped his blue book on my desk and passed into the future." Kennedy received a grade of B, respectable enough for the course. The operative phrase of that everyday encounter, however, ("rather loftily, I thought") personalizes the teller of the story as distinctively as it does Kennedy's attitude toward the incident itself.
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NEWS
March 13, 2014
There has been a lot of heated rhetoric recently about the American Studies Association boycott of Israel and academic freedom and a lot of wild accusations being tossed around, but on thing seems to be missing from this whole brouhaha ( "A chilling effect," March 10). People keep talking about "discrimination," but there doesn't seem to be any realization of who exactly is being discriminated against, with both supporters of Israel and supporters of academia claiming to be the "victims.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Doris McG. Neumann, a retired Friends School educator and longtime activist, died July 16 of heart failure at her Timonium home. She was 93. The daughter of an autoworker and a homemaker, Doris Elaine McGlone was born and raised in Flint, Mich., where she graduated in 1937 from Flint Central High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1941 from the University of Michigan, and taught in public schools in Dearborn, Mich., and Claremont, Calif. In 1941, she married William Louis Neumann.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
I would like to disagree with your editorial "A chilling effect" (March 10). I believe that the central issue here is academic freedom. The American Studies Association (ASA), in theory an academic organization devoted to the study of the United States, has violated the essence of academic freedom, which is based on the free flow of ideas, by supporting a boycott of Israeli academic institutions. By calling for the elimination of ties with Israeli colleges and universities, the ASA has taken a political stand which undermines academic freedom.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - You were almost waiting for someone to say, "Hey, a linguist, a psychologist and an anthropologist come into a bar. Bartender says, `What is this? Some kind of post-structuralist analysis of the urban ethnic jokester tradition?'" That might have gotten a laugh around the Stamp Student Union at the University of Maryland, College Park yesterday - the first of four days of the International Humor Conference, a yearly gathering of more than 100 academics. Presenting such papers as "Relational Effects of Aggressive Humor in Bargaining Interactions" and "Humorous Utterances in the Syntactics Aspect" - as well as one with an alliterative title about breaking wind "for fun and profit" - these scholars are spending the weekend poking and prodding this basic human trait.
FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | November 4, 1991
I t starts in kindergarten, when you trace your little hand on a piece of paper and turn it into a turkey to commemorate Thanksgiving. That's American. Then you read Melville and Hawthorne, you study Jefferson and Madison, you listen to Sousa, you leave it to Beaver and you think: That's American.Think again, the American Studies Association says.Hip-hop is American. Lesbian characters in 19th century literature are American. Eco-feminists are Americans. Crips and Bloods, New York subway graffiti writers, exotic dancers exercising self-expression, Puerto Rican transvestites -- they're all American.
NEWS
By Sherry Joe and Sherry Joe,Sun Staff Writer | November 21, 1994
Ben Kerman was 9 when he first played his double bass at the Kennedy Center in Washington.By the time the Ellicott City youth reached sixth grade, he was principal bassist for the Gifted and Talented All-County Orchestra and had studied with such world-class bassists as Francois Rabbath and Paul Ellison.The 17-year-old Centennial High senior performed again at the Kennedy Center on Saturday, this time as principal bassist for the National Guild Youth Symphony.The son of a music teacher, Ben decided to play the bass because he said his father was least familiar with the largest and lowest-sounding of the string instruments.
NEWS
March 13, 2014
There has been a lot of heated rhetoric recently about the American Studies Association boycott of Israel and academic freedom and a lot of wild accusations being tossed around, but on thing seems to be missing from this whole brouhaha ( "A chilling effect," March 10). People keep talking about "discrimination," but there doesn't seem to be any realization of who exactly is being discriminated against, with both supporters of Israel and supporters of academia claiming to be the "victims.
NEWS
By Will Englund | September 14, 1990
The Baltimore school board set the stage last night for a shift in the city schools' curriculum toward a greater emphasis on African and African-American history and culture.The move adds Baltimore to a list of school systems that are de-emphasizing what critics call the schools' current "Eurocentric" curriculum -- a de-emphasis that has gone smoothly in some cities and generated considerable controversy in others.Proponents argue that such changes in the curriculum give black students more involvement with their studies, and that they help all students understand different cultures.
NEWS
March 11, 2014
I would like to disagree with your editorial "A chilling effect" (March 10). I believe that the central issue here is academic freedom. The American Studies Association (ASA), in theory an academic organization devoted to the study of the United States, has violated the essence of academic freedom, which is based on the free flow of ideas, by supporting a boycott of Israeli academic institutions. By calling for the elimination of ties with Israeli colleges and universities, the ASA has taken a political stand which undermines academic freedom.
NEWS
By Jay Bernstein | January 2, 2014
Over 200 years ago, political theorist and philosopher Edmund Burke memorably remarked: "The only thing necessary for evil to flourish is for good men to do nothing. " This truism comes to mind when assessing the reaction of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County to the recent vote by the American Studies Association (ASA) in favor of an academic boycott of Israel. The ASA, of which UMBC is an institutional member, is the nation's oldest and largest association dedicated to the interdisciplinary study of American history and culture.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | December 23, 2013
The University of Maryland, Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, joined a group of other U.S. universities in opposing a boycott of Israeli academic institutions announced by the American Studies Association this week. The association, a group of about 5,000 American history and culture professors and scholars, said the boycott is aimed at Israeli policies infringing on human rights and the educational freedoms of Palestinians. Two thirds of the 1,252 members who voted on the resolution supported the boycott.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | July 24, 2013
Doris McG. Neumann, a retired Friends School educator and longtime activist, died July 16 of heart failure at her Timonium home. She was 93. The daughter of an autoworker and a homemaker, Doris Elaine McGlone was born and raised in Flint, Mich., where she graduated in 1937 from Flint Central High School. She earned a bachelor's degree in history in 1941 from the University of Michigan, and taught in public schools in Dearborn, Mich., and Claremont, Calif. In 1941, she married William Louis Neumann.
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2010
Courtney Tomchik picked up quite a few awards as she left Broadneck a month ago to get ready for a new lacrosse career at the University of Pennsylvania. The three-sport standout was named the Phoebe Kelly Broadneck Athlete of the Year after a first-team All-Metro lacrosse season, a second-team All-Metro field hockey season and an admirable debut on the indoor track team. US Lacrosse twice named her a regional All-American as well as an Academic All-American. Tomchik, 18, will polish off her high school career with an appearance at Saturday's Under Armour All-America Lacrosse Classic at Towson University.
NEWS
By Sara Neufeld and Sara Neufeld,SUN STAFF | November 30, 2004
To teach her fourth-grade class how history is passed down, Flo Falatko told the children about African-American story quilts and had them make their own. To show them how personal feelings and political views can be expressed, she asked them to write blues songs based on their life experiences and current events. Falatko, a teacher at Cromwell Valley Elementary School in Towson, is one of 118 teachers in Maryland public schools who are teaching a comprehensive new curriculum in African-American studies.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 20, 2002
It's hard for Howard County teens to imagine schools that go without heat, running water and indoor bathrooms. And how could teachers get by on a salary of $50 to $60 a week, even if they did sell goods at a market after school? Yet those are the conditions that Linda Storey witnessed on an educator exchange to Ukraine last month. "It was quite an eye-opener to come back to America ... when they have so little and do so much," she said. Since her return, Storey has been sharing her experience abroad with students and fellow teachers at River Hill High School.
NEWS
November 19, 1996
ONE OF THE REASONS African-American history is today regarded as a legitimate and serious field of study is Benjamin A. Quarles, who died over the weekend at 92. The Morgan State University history professor was a meticulous and uncompromising researcher, who authored such seminal works as "The Negro in the American Revolution" (1961) and "The Negro in the Making of America" (1964).But even though his scholarship earned him honorary doctorates from 17 universities, Dr. Quarles was always aware of the wider context of his achievements.
NEWS
By Maude McDaniel | August 4, 1991
FAR FROM HOME:LIFE AND LOSS INTWO AMERICAN TOWNS.Ron Powers.Random House.317 pages. $22. On a Fourth of July visit to Marshfield, Mo. (population, 5,000), President Bush spent more time celebrating small towns than the victory in the Persian Gulf, according to the Washington Post, ascribing to them "the kind of values that carried this country for over 200 years."The same day, Pulitzer Prize-winner Ron Powers appeared on a network morning show, pushing his new book, "Far From Home." Subtitled "Life and Loss in Two American Towns," it chronicles the apparent demise of Cairo, Ill., and Kent, Conn.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | July 7, 2001
COLLEGE PARK - You were almost waiting for someone to say, "Hey, a linguist, a psychologist and an anthropologist come into a bar. Bartender says, `What is this? Some kind of post-structuralist analysis of the urban ethnic jokester tradition?'" That might have gotten a laugh around the Stamp Student Union at the University of Maryland, College Park yesterday - the first of four days of the International Humor Conference, a yearly gathering of more than 100 academics. Presenting such papers as "Relational Effects of Aggressive Humor in Bargaining Interactions" and "Humorous Utterances in the Syntactics Aspect" - as well as one with an alliterative title about breaking wind "for fun and profit" - these scholars are spending the weekend poking and prodding this basic human trait.
NEWS
November 19, 1996
ONE OF THE REASONS African-American history is today regarded as a legitimate and serious field of study is Benjamin A. Quarles, who died over the weekend at 92. The Morgan State University history professor was a meticulous and uncompromising researcher, who authored such seminal works as "The Negro in the American Revolution" (1961) and "The Negro in the Making of America" (1964).But even though his scholarship earned him honorary doctorates from 17 universities, Dr. Quarles was always aware of the wider context of his achievements.
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