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Janetnickel@hotmail.com | May 9, 2013
Brother Thomas Zoppo, president of Calvert Hall High School College has announced that Charles Stembler, Class of 1983, the school's current assistant principal for Student Affairs, has been appointed Calvert Hall's principal, effective July 1. Stembler will replace Louis Hendrick, who recently retired after 48 years at Calvert, including the last 12 years as principal. Chuck Stembler embraces the vision of St. John Baptist de La Salle and our mission of developing "Men of Intellect, Men of Faith and Men of Integrity.
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NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | May 12, 1991
With animated coaching from 21 other high school students, two limp-armed competitors maneuvered their chins as their machines whirred and buzzed, causing the pages of a textbook to turn.With all of thefacial dexterity they could muster, the students tried to show that a paraplegic could use their group's page turner, a device they spentthe school year engineering and building.The activity is expected to benefit not only the young engineers but also the handicapped and American businesses' ability to compete in the world marketplace.
NEWS
By Marc Tucker and Jerry Weast | June 20, 2011
Maryland's schools have earned top rankings and plaudits in recent years. Yet as students from other countries continue to outscore their U.S. counterparts on international math, science and reading tests, even here the demands for lifting caps on the number of charter schools, tying teacher pay to student performance, and revising or abolishing teacher seniority and tenure rules have grown more insistent. Can any of these measures — or more traditional proposals, such as increasing education funding or reducing class size — propel the U.S. into the ranks of the top-performing nations?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
Just days after the Anne Arundel County branch of the NAACP filed a complaint alleging "disparate treatment" of African-American students and teachers, school board members said the superintendent and school system should be recognized for their continuing efforts to address the matter. On Tuesday, Superintendent Kevin Maxwell, school system staff, community leaders and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People held what the sides called a productive meeting to discuss the complaint.
NEWS
By Brenda L. Becker and Brenda L. Becker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 14, 1996
"A Zen Romance: One Woman's Adventures in a Monastery," by Deborah Boliver Boehm. Kodansha International. 288 pages.$25.This reminiscence of an erstwhile hippie chick seeking enlightenment in Japan may belong to a nascent genre: the Baby Boomer Collegiate Travel Memoir. Just as the sight of one's countrymen abroad can yield startling insights into our national character, the lush and quirky Japanese travelogue is -- most memorable for its evocation of being young and American.The literature of year-abroad reminiscences can't help but alternate between torrents of wide-eyed description and dreamy bouts of self-discovery, and Boehm is still gushing 20 years later.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | August 27, 1993
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- In an outpouring of grief, friends and students attending a memorial service yesterday for a white Fulbright fellow who was dragged from her car and stabbed to death by a black mob recalled her remarkable compassion and commitment to the plight of South Africans.Hundreds of mourners joined in a rendition of the freedom song "Senzenina," or "What Have We Done," during the service for Amy Elizabeth Biehl, 26, from Newport Beach, Calif., who was killed Wednesday in nearby Guguletu township.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | October 25, 2006
Nanibah Showa and Erica Murphy stood next to each other in theater class at Glenelg Country School yesterday and giggled with a comfort that usually takes friends years to build. A week ago, the 14-year-olds were strangers. But a new exchange program brought Nanibah to the private school in Howard County from her home school in Arizona, and the two girls now say they will stay in touch after the program ends Saturday. "It's nice to have someone here ... I can hang out with," said Erica, a ninth-grader from Ellicott City, who in April will join 11 other students from Glenelg Country School at St. Michael Indian School in St. Michaels, Ariz.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 10, 2010
Maryland again ranked first in the nation in the percentages of high school seniors taking and passing Advanced Placement exams, according to a report released Wednesday by the College Board. Maryland surpassed longtime leader New York last year and has improved its numbers since then, with 24.8 percent of high school seniors earning a score of 3 or higher on one AP test compared to 23.4 percent the previous year. Maryland also became the first state in which more than 40 percent of seniors took at least one AP exam.
NEWS
By David Wilson | October 14, 2012
Low graduation rates among African-Americans at Maryland's historically black colleges and universities present a major issue deserving of systematic analysis for solutions. This problem has been well documented by countless media outlets in HBCU communities nationwide, including in a recent Sun editorial. That editorial also challenged Maryland's HBCUs on the efforts of their faculty and administration to create and maintain cultural changes that can reverse the systemic trend of underachievement, which begins well in advance of any student's arrival at any HBCU.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | September 19, 1997
Reacting partly to concerns surrounding the investigation of a Korean-American student slain four years ago, U.S. Civil Rights Commission advisers are planning a study to determine whether Korean-Americans face racial discrimination in Baltimore.The commission's Maryland Advisory Committee, made up of volunteers who have scheduled a hearing on the issue Sept. 29, will be asking for public comments "relating to administration of justice as it applies to Korean Americans," said committee chairman Chester Wickwire.
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