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By Cal Thomas | December 10, 2003
ARLINGTON, Va. - Some American high school students will be taught Chinese language and culture under a $1.4 million program financed by the Beijing government. The Advanced Placement program will be the second of its kind paid for by a foreign government (not counting Saudi Arabia's Wahhabi subsidy of Islamic schools in this country). A similar program underwritten by the Italian government was announced in September. China's ambassador to the United States, Yang Jiechi, and the president of the College Board, former West Virginia Gov. Gaston Caperton, announced the program last week.
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NEWS
By Ann Kirschner | April 28, 2014
As we enter graduation season, students across the country will be worrying less about final exams and more about jobs. What will make them stand out to employers? Working, studying or volunteering away from the United States is one key strategy. Ask a recent graduate about the best experience they had in college, and I bet that you will hear "study abroad" as often as any other answer. It is ironic, but not surprising, that the most transformative college experience is often the one that happened far away from college.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 5, 2004
HAVANA - American medical students in Cuba have returned to the United States, missing their final exams, over fears that U.S. authorities will jail them, fine them thousands of dollars or revoke their citizenship for studying medicine on the island. New Bush administration measures that took effect Wednesday severely restrict Americans' presence on the island. The Office of Foreign Assets Control, an arm of the Treasury Department, issued a letter June 25 saying the students could stay until Aug. 1. But many of the students didn't get the word in time.
NEWS
December 3, 2013
A report this week that American students are lagging behind their top international peers in math, reading and science should give pause to those who argue that the nation's school reform efforts are going too far and too fast. In fact, they suggest just the opposite: The, at best, middling scores of American 15-year-olds not only challenge the notion of American "exceptionalism," they also threaten over time to erode the educational foundations of the world's largest economy and its global political and military influence.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | August 25, 1993
In the 1980s, private colleges priced themselves out of the market for most American students. This is the 1990s. It's the state colleges' turn.The Os could always trade Camden Yards for a couple of real pitchers.
NEWS
By Donna W. Payne and Donna W. Payne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 18, 2001
The week before he left for Spain, Glenelg High School student Chuck Abbott began to dream in Spanish - not his native language. Also headed for Spain, Alysa Procida from Wilde Lake High wondered if she would be able to "effectively communicate what I want to say [in Spanish]." Angela Pipitone of Atholton High and Melissa Webster of River Hill High School bought flag T-shirts, Old Bay seasoning and crab-themed gifts for their host families in Spain. The sophomores and juniors were part of a group of 18 county students who visited Spain for 2 1/2 weeks in late June and early July.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | August 19, 1997
OCEAN CITY -- The land of opportunity has been attracting a new breed of immigrants.In waves of thousands, European students are coming to American seaside towns for the low-paying seasonal jobs that American students -- who can chill out and live rent free if they spend summer at home -- reject.In Ocean City, at least 10 percent of the 10,000 to 12,000 seasonal hires every summer are European college students, according to Alex Fauntleroy, executive director of the city's Chamber of Commerce.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,Staff Writer | October 26, 1992
In some cases, the pajamas were the only way to tell the American students from the German students visiting North County High School last week.As part of the festivities preceding homecoming weekend, Thursday was pajama day at the Linthicum high school. In a show of spirit, students shuffled down the hallways in bathrobes and fuzzy slippers.This spirit thing was all new to the group of 21 10th- and 11th-graders who had traveled from the Rotteck Gymnasium in Freiburg, Germany, for a 3 1/2 -week exchange program.
NEWS
November 27, 2006
School surveys show that more American students are taking math courses such as algebra and calculus - but what are they learning? A kind of phony debate has sprung up about whether they need more basics, such as multiplication and long division, or more so-called creative applications such as problem solving. The sensible answer, according to the nation's math teachers, is both. If more students understand the basics, they can apply that knowledge to solving complex problems. And they can also help keep America globally competitive.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 5, 1997
The extraordinary event happened in a classroom at one of those much maligned Baltimore City public schools. In the first semester of the 1996-1997 school year, Lamar Shields' Spanish class wrote a children's book with a multicultural theme.On Monday, most of that class came on their own time - some even gave up lunch - to discuss the book, "The First Day of School." The 26 Baltimore City College students wrote the story themselves. Rodney Kitchen and Sean Dorsey handled the color illustrations.
NEWS
Janetnickel@hotmail.com | May 9, 2013
Brother Thomas Zoppo, president of Calvert Hall High School College has announced that Charles Stembler, Class of 1983, the school's current assistant principal for Student Affairs, has been appointed Calvert Hall's principal, effective July 1. Stembler will replace Louis Hendrick, who recently retired after 48 years at Calvert, including the last 12 years as principal. Chuck Stembler embraces the vision of St. John Baptist de La Salle and our mission of developing "Men of Intellect, Men of Faith and Men of Integrity.
NEWS
By David Wilson | October 14, 2012
Low graduation rates among African-Americans at Maryland's historically black colleges and universities present a major issue deserving of systematic analysis for solutions. This problem has been well documented by countless media outlets in HBCU communities nationwide, including in a recent Sun editorial. That editorial also challenged Maryland's HBCUs on the efforts of their faculty and administration to create and maintain cultural changes that can reverse the systemic trend of underachievement, which begins well in advance of any student's arrival at any HBCU.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
Just days after the Anne Arundel County branch of the NAACP filed a complaint alleging "disparate treatment" of African-American students and teachers, school board members said the superintendent and school system should be recognized for their continuing efforts to address the matter. On Tuesday, Superintendent Kevin Maxwell, school system staff, community leaders and the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People held what the sides called a productive meeting to discuss the complaint.
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2011
Anne Arundel County schools have not made sufficient progress in eliminating racial bias from its student disciplinary practices, according to a civil rights complaint filed by the NAACP. The complaint, filed with the civil rights office of the U.S. Department of Education on Friday, alleges that the numbers of African-American students referred for discipline and suspended have hardly changed since a similar complaint in 2004. That complaint led to an improvement plan agreed to in 2005 by the NAACP and the school system.
NEWS
By Marc Tucker and Jerry Weast | June 20, 2011
Maryland's schools have earned top rankings and plaudits in recent years. Yet as students from other countries continue to outscore their U.S. counterparts on international math, science and reading tests, even here the demands for lifting caps on the number of charter schools, tying teacher pay to student performance, and revising or abolishing teacher seniority and tenure rules have grown more insistent. Can any of these measures — or more traditional proposals, such as increasing education funding or reducing class size — propel the U.S. into the ranks of the top-performing nations?
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Along a road in Wamunyu, Kenya, sits a water tank with a sign that reads: "This tank was built with funds from Southern MS, Lothian, MD, USA. " During the Thanksgiving holiday, Southern Middle School teacher Laura Groo visited the East African country to see the water tank firsthand and relish the fruits of a school read-a-thon project last year that raised more than $3,000 to finance the tank. The read-a-thon was so successful that there were funds left over, which were used to buy gym equipment for Kyamatula Primary School, where the water tank is located.
NEWS
By JUSTIN MARTIN | January 19, 2006
AMMAN, JORDAN -- Much has been said in the last five years about the lack of Arabic speakers in the United States, especially those willing and qualified to work for the federal government. After 9/11, America scrambled to find qualified linguists to help fight terrorism. Long overshadowed by the more easily learned romance languages, Arabic got short shrift at most American colleges and universities. With the rare exceptions of schools such as Georgetown University and Middlebury College in Vermont, which has been recognized for its intensive summer language program, American universities simply did not have advanced Arabic programs or the professors to lead them.
NEWS
December 16, 2004
THE LATEST news about how well American students match up with their international peers is decidedly mixed. According to one study released this week, American eighth-graders are doing better in math than they did nine years ago. But fourth-graders have stagnated in math and regressed a little in science. During the same period, students in other countries improved even more, causing the United States to slip in the overall rankings. Another survey released last week showed that 15-year-olds in the United States are not as good at solving real-life math problems as their counterparts in other industrialized countries, including Finland, South Korea, Japan and Canada.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV | john-john.williams@baltsun.com | March 15, 2010
Perched on her skates, Justise Fleming watched intently as her instructor spun around on the ice with ease. Then the determined 7-year-old from Patterson Park dug her right toe pick into the ice, reached back and swiveled in place. As her spin slowed she wobbled a bit like a tightrope walker on the high wire. But a sly smile of accomplishment spread across her face. A few feet away, 14 other girls tried the same two-foot spin. Most succeeded, but several plopped down hard. A few shrieks pierced the cold air of the Dominic Mimi DiPietro Family Skating Center in Patterson Park.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Baltimore Sun reporter | February 10, 2010
Maryland again ranked first in the nation in the percentages of high school seniors taking and passing Advanced Placement exams, according to a report released Wednesday by the College Board. Maryland surpassed longtime leader New York last year and has improved its numbers since then, with 24.8 percent of high school seniors earning a score of 3 or higher on one AP test compared to 23.4 percent the previous year. Maryland also became the first state in which more than 40 percent of seniors took at least one AP exam.
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