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By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SOI-DISANT English has a complicated relationship with French. Thanks to the Normans, more than half of English words are of French or Latin derivation. French also enjoyed a very long span of prestige; it was commonly spoken at the royal courts of Europe and was the language of international diplomacy until Anglo-American political, military, and economic power gave English greater heft in the twentieth century.  So it is not surprising that English should have incorporated a large number of words wholesale from French, of which today's word, soi-disant  (pronounced SWAH-duh-SAHN)
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | May 12, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  SOI-DISANT English has a complicated relationship with French. Thanks to the Normans, more than half of English words are of French or Latin derivation. French also enjoyed a very long span of prestige; it was commonly spoken at the royal courts of Europe and was the language of international diplomacy until Anglo-American political, military, and economic power gave English greater heft in the twentieth century.  So it is not surprising that English should have incorporated a large number of words wholesale from French, of which today's word, soi-disant  (pronounced SWAH-duh-SAHN)
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BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 10, 1993
In what brokers called a "Clinton rally," stocks surged to record highs yesterday. On the first trading day after Congress passed the president's deficit-reduction bill, interest rates on 30-year government bonds sank to a record low (6.46 percent), pushing the Dow Jones industrial average ahead 15.65 points to a closing peak of 3,576.08.QUOTE OF THE WEEK: "If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see how much it costs when it's free." (P. J. O'Rourke, The American Spectator.
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | August 10, 1993
In what brokers called a "Clinton rally," stocks surged to record highs yesterday. On the first trading day after Congress passed the president's deficit-reduction bill, interest rates on 30-year government bonds sank to a record low (6.46 percent), pushing the Dow Jones industrial average ahead 15.65 points to a closing peak of 3,576.08.QUOTE OF THE WEEK: "If you think health care is expensive now, wait until you see how much it costs when it's free." (P. J. O'Rourke, The American Spectator.
FEATURES
By Tim Warren and Tim Warren,Book Editor | September 9, 1992
McLean, Va.--There's usually a twinkle in his eye when Bob Tyrrell speaks, which is good since he says so many nasty things. In that way, he's not unlike one of his models, H. L. Mencken, a writer who could be as outrageous as he could be charming.That's why Mr. Tyrrell is an appropriate choice to speak at the Enoch Pratt Free Library's annual Mencken Day festivities, which will take place Saturday at the Central Branch.When Mr. Tyrrell speaks, liberals get the most flak, as one might suspect about this fiercely conservative writer and editor of the American Spectator, but here's an observation about the current president, who happens to be a Republican (like Mr. Tyrrell)
FEATURES
By James Warren and James Warren,Chicago Tribune | January 2, 1994
"Ah, he'll be a picnic," R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. had said just a few weeks before the presidential inauguration of Bill Clinton, during a brief trek back to his native Chicago.Well, last week it was as if Mr. Tyrrell, a proud raconteur and provocateur, was having a picnic in which the wieners were exploding on the grill, ketchup bottles were flying and furious guests were racing for cover.Mr. Tyrrell is founder and editor in chief of the American Spectator, an acerbic, nervy, at times all-too brazen, political monthly of conservative bent whose circulation is soaring and is assured of going even higher after inspiring the biggest bimbo eruption to engulf Bill Clinton.
TOPIC
By Herbert London | August 22, 1999
NEW YORK -- Geraldo Rivera has made a reputation for himself with grand events such as the opening of gangster Al Capone's vault.The vault turned out to be empty, as have so many of the claims from the TV talk show host. Yet, stories such as these, devoid of factual content, haven't stood in the way of Rivera's rise to television fame.He commands a salary well into seven figures. His television persona (on display on the CNBC talk show "Rivera Live!") is based on indignation -- over the way President Clinton has been treated, over the O.J. Simpson verdict, over political views he doesn't share.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  DOUGHTY English has a very old word for being bold and resolute. Doughty  (pronounced DOWT-ee) appears in the Abingdon Chronicle  of A.D. 1030, the OED  tells us: a "dohtiga eorl," or doughty earl.  It's a thoroughly germanic word, the Old English version, dyhtig , deriving from the Old High German tuchtig , "fit," "good," "excellent.
NEWS
September 24, 1993
FROM "100 Reasons Why Jimmy Carter Was a Better Preident Than Bill Clinton" by P.J. O'Rourke in the September American Spectator:1. Jimmy Carter had a nicer wife.. . . 6. Carter had governed a more important state.. . . 12. Carter committed adultery only in his heart.. . . 14. As for military record, Carter was, comparatively speaking, a regular Audie Murphy.. . . 18. Jogging actually worked for Carter. Say what you want against the man, he was no double butt.. . . 47. Joseph Califano was prettier than Donna Shalala.
NEWS
By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 16, 2001
WASHINGTON - Theodore B. Olson's role as the politically savvy attorney who successfully argued George W. Bush's case before the Supreme Court in the contested presidential election last year may have helped him land the nomination for U.S. solicitor general. But the conservative lawyer's role as a Clinton antagonist during the Whitewater-Lewinsky years has turned that nomination into a battle. Last week, the Senate Judiciary Committee postponed until tomorrow a vote on Olson's nomination after doubts were cast on his account of his role in a conservative magazine's effort to uncover material damaging to Bill Clinton.
FEATURES
By Bruce McCabe and Bruce McCabe,Boston Globe | May 7, 1995
This week's biggest magazine news comes with a four-month lead time attached: Rupert Murdoch has agreed to back a national political weekly of conservative bent that will begin publication around Labor Day. The Standard, as the periodical is to be called, will have as its editor and publisher William Kristol, a leading Republican strategist and former chief of staff to Dan Quayle. Also aboard will be the New Republic's Fred Barnes, as executive editor, and New York Post television critic John Podhoretz, as deputy editor.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2014
Each week The Sun's John McIntyre presents a relatively obscure but evocative word with which you may not be familiar, another brick to add to the wall of your vocabulary. This week's word:  PENURIOUS  You can be poor, penniless, strapped, hard up, skint , or stony broke. But if you want to add a Latinate dignity to your impoverishment, you could be penurious  (pronounced puh-NOOR-e-us). It comes from the Latin penuria , "want," "need," from which we also get penury , "poverty.
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