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NEWS
October 24, 2012
Your recent editorial argued that Question 6 is about equal rights and that "the gay marriage law strongly protects religious liberties" no matter what opponents say ("Gallaudet's mistake," Oct. 12). It seems disingenuous to argue that Maryland's gay marriage law will protect religious liberties for any extended period of time. Recently the New York Times reported that Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee, who signed the a union bill there, did so even though he thought the religious protections of the legislation were overly broad.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | November 30, 2013
Harry F. Reid Jr., who was internationally known for his work with synthetic lubricants, died Nov. 17 of pneumonia at Carroll Hospice's Dove House in Westminster. He was 96. Harry Fairfax Reid Jr. was born and raised in Baltimore and graduated in 1935 from the Polytechnic Institute. He earned a bachelor's degree in 1938 from Swarthmore College, where he was also an All-American lacrosse player. In 1940, he was commissioned a lieutenant in the Army Reserves. Later that year, he volunteered for active duty and was sent to the Ordnance Training Center at the Aberdeen Proving Ground.
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,SUN STAFF | June 4, 1998
COLLEGE PARK -- If the summit convened here yesterday by Maryland Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend had been strictly about the working poor, about day care solutions for blue-collar families, or about the plight of single mothers, the debate would have taken a more unified, less meandering path.But the daylong summit's topic -- "Solutions: Women's Juggle for Time" -- cast a wide net, attempting to examine the needs of all women, from the most affluent working moms to those most disenfranchised and with little sense of dignity and hope.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | May 23, 2013
Regardless of how most of us feel about individual elected officials or their leanings on particular policies, it's a fair observation that a lot of people get involved with politics because they want to make a difference. Some lose their moral compasses and succumb to the temptations presented to those who end up with authority for allocating public money or hiring public employees. Others may well have been no good from the start. History tells us all political parties are afflicted with people who give in to temptation or got into politics to have access to such temptations.
FEATURES
By Alice Steinbach and Alice Steinbach,SUN STAFF | December 31, 1995
NEW YORK -- Stanley Crouch, as always, is running late. "Come back in 30 minutes," he booms out over the intercom from his third-floor Greenwich Village apartment. His disembodied voice is deep and musical, evoking visions of James Earl Jones delivering a sultry Barry White song, one that might be titled, given Mr. Crouch's passion for jazz and blues, something like: "I've Got the Come Back in 30 Minutes Blues."Thirty minutes later, as promised, the body that goes with the voice appears at the doorway to his apartment.
FEATURES
By ANN HORNADAY and ANN HORNADAY,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 4, 1998
Spike Lee can be called many things, but subtle isn't one of them.Take the lead character of his new film, "He Got Game," a high school basketball star played by the Milwaukee Bucks' Ray Allen. On the eve of graduation from high school, he finds himself caught up in a vortex of agents, college recruiters, friends and family members. Everybody wants a piece of him.Allen's character is called Jesus Shuttlesworth, which is a double whammy. There's the first name, which not only has obvious connotations, but was also a nickname for Earl "The Pearl" Monroe when he was coming up in North Philadelphia.
NEWS
February 2, 1994
An erroneous item appeared in the Black History Month calendar published Monday. "The Contributions of African-American Women to American Society" will be discussed from noon to 1:30 p.m. Feb. 25 in the VIP lounge at Loyola College. The event is free. There will be no lecture on gospel music.The Sun regrets the errors.
FEATURES
February 13, 2006
Feb. 13 1795: The University of North Carolina became the first U.S. state university to admit students with the arrival of Hinton James. 1914: The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers was founded. 1920: The League of Nations recognized the perpetual neutrality of Switzerland.
BUSINESS
July 15, 2006
Acquisitions Phillips Edison & Co. a Baltimore-based shopping center owner/management company, bought Lakway Shopping Center in Truth or Consequences, N.M. Terms were not disclosed. CVP Wind Ventures of Silver Spring acquired the wind project design portfolio of Distribution Generation Systems Inc. of Lakewood, Colo. Kudos David H. Fishman of the Baltimore firm of Gordon, Feinblatt, Rothman, Hoffberger & Hollander LLC, has been named to the International Who's Who of Business Lawyers 2006 and Who's Who Legal USA: Real Estate 2006.
NEWS
September 24, 2003
Mark Fineman, 51, a veteran Los Angeles Times reporter, died yesterday of an apparent heart attack while on assignment in Baghdad. Mr. Fineman had worked for the paper for 18 years. He had reported from the Philippines, India, Cyprus and Mexico City, been the paper's Caribbean correspondent based in Florida, and at his death was on assignment in Iraq for the Times' Washington bureau. He received a variety of honors, including an Overseas Press Club award in 2001, a National Headliners award in 1991, an American Society of Newspaper Editors award for deadline writing in 1987 and a George Polk award in 1985.
NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | May 20, 2013
While the political winds seem to be propelling the first comprehensive immigration reform in more than a quarter-century, every day our broken immigration system takes a cruel and little-noticed toll on countless hardworking, law-abiding individuals and their families. On any given day, approximately 34,000 immigrants are behind bars and more than 1,000 are deported - often for minor, technical violations of laws that are too byzantine for all but the most seasoned immigration lawyers to understand.
NEWS
February 27, 2013
Sunday night, many Americans watched the Academy Awards; celebrating Hollywood's finest, analyzing red carpet entrances, and critiquing stars' fashion choices. For a few hours we are offered a glimpse into a world of glitter and wealth foreign to most Americans. For many people, the Oscars offer a welcome distraction from the impending sequestration, the bitter partisan political atmosphere, the economic downturn, and the myriad crises playing out around the world. The Oscars acknowledge the year's top film professionals, from actors and directors, to cinematographers and editors.
NEWS
October 24, 2012
Your recent editorial argued that Question 6 is about equal rights and that "the gay marriage law strongly protects religious liberties" no matter what opponents say ("Gallaudet's mistake," Oct. 12). It seems disingenuous to argue that Maryland's gay marriage law will protect religious liberties for any extended period of time. Recently the New York Times reported that Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee, who signed the a union bill there, did so even though he thought the religious protections of the legislation were overly broad.
HEALTH
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2012
Before she joined the sea of pink-clothed people who turned out for a breast cancer walk in Baltimore Sunday morning, Janet Warren filled out a medical history and gave a blood sample. It was a different way to show her commitment to the cause - one that will last for years. The American Cancer Society is recruiting adults who haven't had cancer to take part in a broad, long-lasting prevention study, the latest in a string of studies that date back 60 years. The nonprofit group hopes that by collecting health and lifestyle information from 300,000 Americans, it can help researchers find more clues to the frustrating mystery that is cancer - and develop more ways of battling it. Participants agree to send updates every few years for the next two to three decades.
NEWS
October 7, 2012
Ravens center Matt Birk has entered the debate over same-sex marriage, both here and in his native Minnesota. He has done so in a thoughtful and respectful way that is rooted in his Roman Catholic faith and rejects hateful language or homophobia. He raises serious questions about the reason for government's involvement in marriage, the institution's place in society and the effect that allowing same-sex marriage will have. They deserve serious answers. Mr. Birk first made his arguments in the context of a proposed constitutional amendment that would ban same-sex marriage in Minnesota.
NEWS
By Joe Pettit | February 22, 2012
Imagine a report that reached the following three conclusions: In Maryland, 35 percent of males passed Advanced Placement exams, but only 8 percent of females passed them; 70 percent of males who took the AP exams could pass them, but only 28 percent of females could; and nationally, an estimated 79 percent of females who could succeed in AP courses were not even being offered them. The outcry over such differences by gender in achievement and access to AP tests would result in a massive public outcry over obvious systemic failures to educate males and females equally.
BUSINESS
October 17, 2004
The following events are scheduled for the Baltimore Convention Center. Oct. 17-20 National Association of Campus Activities convention. Estimated attendance: 1,500. Oct. 18-24 American Society of Civil Engineers convention. Estimated attendance: 4,000+. Oct. 24-26 American Association of Blood Banks convention. Estimated attendance: 7,000+. Contact number: 301-215-6591. Oct. 26-28 Fire Protection Publications meeting. Estimated attendance: 2,500. Contact number: 405-744-8309. Oct. 26-30 National Conference of Nurse Practitioners meeting.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 22, 2011
David Lucien Gaudreau, a retired engineer and builder, died of congestive heart failure July 12 at his Naples, Fla., home. He was 93. Born in Braintree, Mass., he was the son of architect Lucien E.D. Gaudreau, who moved to Baltimore in the 1920s as a project architect for the construction of St. Mary's Seminary in Roland Park. Mr. Gaudreau was a 1937 graduate of Calvert Hall College High School, where he earned 10 varsity letters in football, baseball, basketball and swimming. He was named to the All-Maryland team by local sports writers.
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