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By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2002
MEMBERS OF the deaf community shared folklore from deaf culture, told children's stories and even a few jokes last week as the central branch of the library celebrated Deaf Awareness Week with an evening of American Sign Language storytelling. The event was also an opportunity to promote the new American Sign Language (ASL) video collection at the library. The collection contains more than 200 videos, including classic literature translated into ASL, popular movies with closed captioning, basic ASL lessons and ASL stories that appeal to children.
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NEWS
By Caroline Solomon and Jeffrey Archer Miller | April 25, 2014
In the midst of the misery of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the media fell in love with then-New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's sign language interpreter, Lydia Callis, who captivated audiences with her expressive renderings of Mr. Bloomberg's humdrum press conferences. "A bright light during dark days: Bloomberg's sign language star," swooned National Public Radio. New York Magazine praised her as "a legitimate reason to smile" in difficult times. And Saturday Night Live, in a sign she had truly arrived, impersonated her during an opening skit.
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NEWS
By Caroline Solomon and Jeffrey Archer Miller | April 25, 2014
In the midst of the misery of Hurricane Sandy in 2012, the media fell in love with then-New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's sign language interpreter, Lydia Callis, who captivated audiences with her expressive renderings of Mr. Bloomberg's humdrum press conferences. "A bright light during dark days: Bloomberg's sign language star," swooned National Public Radio. New York Magazine praised her as "a legitimate reason to smile" in difficult times. And Saturday Night Live, in a sign she had truly arrived, impersonated her during an opening skit.
NEWS
December 24, 2013
I read with interest Kelby Brick's recent op-ed on the signing impostor at Nelson Mandela's memorial service ( "Fake interpreter draws ire," Dec. 17). As an attorney who regularly represents deaf individuals, I can confirm that Mr. Brick is absolutely correct about the often dangerous conditions that many deaf people face due to communication breakdowns. With frightening regularity, I encounter hospitals that rely on "signing" nurses who lack basic proficiency in American Sign Language, cursory handwritten notes and rudimentary gestures to convey complex information about medical conditions, test results and treatments.
FEATURES
August 26, 1998
"I like 'Koko's Kitten' by Francine Patterson. She taught a female baby gorilla American Sign Language. American Sign Language is used by deaf people in order to talk with their hands. When Dr. Patterson ask Koko what she wanted on her 12th birthday, Koko signed 'cat.' "- Lanika HinesSeneca Elementary"If you like books about angels, you will like 'The High Rise Glorious Skittle Skat Roarious Sky Pie Angel Food Cake' by Nancy Willard. It is about a girl who tries to make a cake for her mother with her great-grandmother's recipe.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | September 1, 1992
A study of a deaf child's linguistic abilities is stirring up an ancient debate over the nature of language. Is the human brain uniquely programmed to make and learn languages or does it simply pick up on ordered structures perceived when a child is first exposed to speech?The subject, a 9-year-old boy named Simon, is uniquely appropriate for the experiment of asking whether language is learned or innate because he learned an error-riddled form of American Sign Language from his parents, who are also deaf, and a quite different sign language, with different grammatical rules, at his school.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | December 3, 1996
Several teen fashions will be barred from Anne Arundel schools under a proposal to strengthen the dress code.Crop tops, short shorts and underwear-revealing baggy pants are among the targeted clothing. The school board will review the proposal at its meeting tomorrowand could put it into effect ++ in January.An initial revision of the one-paragraph dress code failed to win board approval in June.The proposed policy would bar clothes and accessories that depict obscenity or violence; promote the use or abuse of tobacco, drugs or alcohol; pose a health or safety risk; or disrupt school.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2005
Trix Bruce has earned a reputation for making her audiences laugh without saying a word. The Seattle-based performer, who has been profoundly deaf since she was 6 months old, is bringing her improv comedy act to Anne Arundel Community College tomorrow. She'll perform at the Pascal Center for Performing Arts from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The show will be in American Sign Language (ASL), with an interpreter for audience members who don't know the language. "It's going to be a very funny show," said Nan Pennington, vice president of the college's American Sign Language Club, which is sponsoring the event.
NEWS
December 24, 2013
I read with interest Kelby Brick's recent op-ed on the signing impostor at Nelson Mandela's memorial service ( "Fake interpreter draws ire," Dec. 17). As an attorney who regularly represents deaf individuals, I can confirm that Mr. Brick is absolutely correct about the often dangerous conditions that many deaf people face due to communication breakdowns. With frightening regularity, I encounter hospitals that rely on "signing" nurses who lack basic proficiency in American Sign Language, cursory handwritten notes and rudimentary gestures to convey complex information about medical conditions, test results and treatments.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The day after protesters at Gallaudet University, the world's premier university for the deaf, prevailed in their battle to oust the incoming president, they pressed forward with their broader demands, saying that students must have a greater say in the search for a new president and that the next choice should be a more forceful advocate for deaf culture and a strong deaf identity. "We are looking for a person who's sensitive enough, who has respect for all cultures and for American Sign Language," Noah Beckman, president of the student government, signed through an interpreter.
NEWS
By Kelby Brick | December 17, 2013
Among the distinguished heads of state and dignitaries at Nelson Mandela's memorial service, one man stood out for the wrong reasons. The event featured a fraudster on stage pretending to be a sign language interpreter. Wilma Newhoudt-Druchen, the first deaf woman to be elected to the South African parliament (and one of the few deaf elected politicians in the world) immediately demanded that the man be removed. The impostor deprived deaf South Africans the opportunity to participate with their country in mourning, honoring and celebrating Mr. Mandela and his commitment to civil and human rights - a brazenly oppressive act that drew wide outrage.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 31, 2006
WASHINGTON -- The day after protesters at Gallaudet University, the world's premier university for the deaf, prevailed in their battle to oust the incoming president, they pressed forward with their broader demands, saying that students must have a greater say in the search for a new president and that the next choice should be a more forceful advocate for deaf culture and a strong deaf identity. "We are looking for a person who's sensitive enough, who has respect for all cultures and for American Sign Language," Noah Beckman, president of the student government, signed through an interpreter.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 5, 2005
Trix Bruce has earned a reputation for making her audiences laugh without saying a word. The Seattle-based performer, who has been profoundly deaf since she was 6 months old, is bringing her improv comedy act to Anne Arundel Community College tomorrow. She'll perform at the Pascal Center for Performing Arts from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. The show will be in American Sign Language (ASL), with an interpreter for audience members who don't know the language. "It's going to be a very funny show," said Nan Pennington, vice president of the college's American Sign Language Club, which is sponsoring the event.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2004
Jumping to their feet, the 10 children playing charades clamored to be the first to give the right answers. "Fireman?" "Teacher?" "Cat?" All three were correct. The eager pupils were rattling off guesses to the clues - just in a different language. They were signing in response to the pantomime. The children, all from the Maryland School for the Deaf in Frederick, were learning about everyday heroes at McDaniel College's summer literacy camp. More importantly, they were learning to improve their English - both reading and writing - as well as American Sign Language.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 2004
Before moving to Maryland, the Weidig family regularly drove more than an hour so their two deaf sons could attend a Catholic church that had a Mass with sign-language interpretation. Now residents of Ellicott City, the Weidigs attend Mass at that community's Church of the Resurrection, which has a ministry for the deaf. "If it wasn't for the signed Masses, it would be a huge drain on my own faith," Hans Weidig said, because he and his wife would have to sign the liturgy for their sons.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 2, 2002
MEMBERS OF the deaf community shared folklore from deaf culture, told children's stories and even a few jokes last week as the central branch of the library celebrated Deaf Awareness Week with an evening of American Sign Language storytelling. The event was also an opportunity to promote the new American Sign Language (ASL) video collection at the library. The collection contains more than 200 videos, including classic literature translated into ASL, popular movies with closed captioning, basic ASL lessons and ASL stories that appeal to children.
NEWS
By Kelby Brick | December 17, 2013
Among the distinguished heads of state and dignitaries at Nelson Mandela's memorial service, one man stood out for the wrong reasons. The event featured a fraudster on stage pretending to be a sign language interpreter. Wilma Newhoudt-Druchen, the first deaf woman to be elected to the South African parliament (and one of the few deaf elected politicians in the world) immediately demanded that the man be removed. The impostor deprived deaf South Africans the opportunity to participate with their country in mourning, honoring and celebrating Mr. Mandela and his commitment to civil and human rights - a brazenly oppressive act that drew wide outrage.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 7, 2004
Before moving to Maryland, the Weidig family regularly drove more than an hour so their two deaf sons could attend a Catholic church that had a Mass with sign-language interpretation. Now residents of Ellicott City, the Weidigs attend Mass at that community's Church of the Resurrection, which has a ministry for the deaf. "If it wasn't for the signed Masses, it would be a huge drain on my own faith," Hans Weidig said, because he and his wife would have to sign the liturgy for their sons.
NEWS
By Maria Blackburn and Maria Blackburn,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2001
When the doorbell rings at McDaniel House, lights flash. When residents of the Western Maryland College dormitory want to get one another's attention, they stomp their feet on hardwood floors. And when the young women who live there want to talk, they use their hands. As one of only a few American Sign Language-immersion houses in the nation, the 11-student dorm was designed to teach hearing students about sign language and deaf culture by having them live in what the school calls a "deaf-friendly" environment.
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