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NEWS
September 16, 2014
Michael Foucault, the French philosopher who wrote on asylums, hysterical administrators and irrational bureaucrats, allegedly asked his host when he visited America to show him a high school. After closely observing the structure of an American school, its rules and procedures, he complained: "No, no! I asked to see a school, not a prison. " The recent disciplining of a Howard County high school student for unfurling a Confederate flag at a football game is a splendid example of free speech being mocked ( "Rally scheduled Monday in wake of Confederate flags at Howard Co. school," Sept.
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NEWS
September 16, 2014
Michael Foucault, the French philosopher who wrote on asylums, hysterical administrators and irrational bureaucrats, allegedly asked his host when he visited America to show him a high school. After closely observing the structure of an American school, its rules and procedures, he complained: "No, no! I asked to see a school, not a prison. " The recent disciplining of a Howard County high school student for unfurling a Confederate flag at a football game is a splendid example of free speech being mocked ( "Rally scheduled Monday in wake of Confederate flags at Howard Co. school," Sept.
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NEWS
February 3, 1991
During the week of Feb. 3-9, Anne Arundel County Schools will celebrate the contributions school counselors make to the academic and social well-being of students, during National School Counseling Week.This year's observance is sponsored by the American School CounselorAssociation and Sylvan Learning Centers. The theme, "School Counselors: Power Based Professionals Initiating Change," and will focus on counselors as agents for positive change in students' lives.Activities during the week will highlight the vital counseling services and encourage students and parents to consult counselors for assistance in the in the areas of career choice, academic difficulty, solutions to personal problems, and counseling for family issues.
NEWS
By James Campbell | January 7, 2013
Education policy wasn't a significant issue in the 2012 presidential election, but it needs to be one in 2013. Americans are increasingly dissatisfied with public education, and no small wonder: studies continue to show that our schools, once the envy of the world, have fallen to the middle of the pack or worse. Such concern prompted a task force led by former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and former New York City School Chancellor Joel I. Klein to issue a report for the Council on Foreign relations stating that the "The United States' failure to educate its students leaves them unprepared to compete and threatens the country's ability to thrive in the global economy.
NEWS
April 30, 2000
Ann Eckhardt Moylan, 66, historic preservationist Ann Eckhardt Moylan, who was active in Washington County historic preservation circles, died Tuesday of cancer at her home, The Long Meadows near Hagerstown. She was 66. She was a volunteer with the Save Historic Antietam Foundation. She was a member of the Washington County Historical Society. In the 1970s, she restored her home, The Long Meadows and worked to have it listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Born in Glyndon, the former Ann Eckhardt was a 1955 graduate of Western Maryland College, where she received a bachelor of arts degree in psychology.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 13, 2003
OPELIKA, Ala. - When 17-year-old Tianna Summers puts a fork full of fresh lima beans in her mouth in the school lunchroom here, she is eating a vegetable seldom seen in any other American school. "Junk food is not the center of our universe," Summers said, polishing off a meal of barbecued pork, the lima beans and a salad. But in most of the country, it is. A school lunch often looks like an exercise in fat loading, with a supersize soft drink from a vending machine, followed by a candy bar from another machine.
NEWS
By Laura Shovan and Laura Shovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 5, 2003
Cultural diversity is more than just a popular educational theme in Howard County - it is a reality. More than 1,500 county students receive ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) services. These children come from 81 countries and speak 73 languages. Many of them have parents who speak little English and are unfamiliar with how an American school system operates. "There are lots of things blocking them from helping their children," said Young-chan Han, ESOL family outreach liaison.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
On visits to several county schools in recent days, Du Gun was surprised to see principals out of their offices mingling with students and teachers. She was struck by the fact that teachers and students interact as much as they do. And she was impressed by how special-needs students and other students are taught in one classroom. Gun, principal of an elementary school in Beijing, is among a group of educators from China who are visiting Howard County schools to learn more about American education.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | August 31, 1999
Mary Smithson had some larger-than-usual students in her class.Smithson, an Annapolis Elementary School second-grade teacher, taught her first lesson of the school year yesterday -- to parents along with her pupils."
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF | September 9, 1996
With all contracts awarded, South Shore Elementary School will cost nearly $6.2 million, some $465,000 over the estimate of $5.7 million.However, the school system will have to pay only the $5.7 million it originally budgeted for the project, said Rodell E. Phaire Sr., director of facilities planning and construction.The reason is a new system that used a construction management firm to develop the cost estimate. Baltimore-based Whiting-Turner Contracting Co. guaranteed it would bring the project in on time and at the estimate it developed.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | December 31, 2012
After a tragedy like the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Newtown, Conn., the injection of anything short of seriousness into the subsequent public discourse about guns is touchy. But the National Rifle Association blasted numerous rounds into that particular barrier with NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre's mouth. The organization's hysteric solution to gun violence in America is to put designated sitting ducks - er, "armed police officers" - in every American school.
NEWS
By Phillip J. Closius | June 4, 2012
The Golden Age of American legal education is dead. Every law dean knows it, but only some of them will feel it. Elite schools (the top 25 in U.S. News & World Report's rankings) and the 43 non-elite state "flagship" law schools are almost immune to market pressures. Those at risk will come from the other 132 law schools - the ones that produce the majority of law graduates. Law schools have increased tuition drastically for almost 20 years, beginning in the 1990s when universities refused to continue subsidizing the affordable public law schools.
NEWS
By Nick Madigan, The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2010
Baltimore County police have arrested and charged two people in the stabbing of a 21-year-old man Monday in Woodlawn's Security Square Mall. Andre A. Wright, a student at North American Trade School, was assaulted by two people who had attempted to rob him earlier in the day, police said. Wright, who lives in East Baltimore, was taken to Maryland Shock Trauma Center and was released Thursday. One of the suspects, Roland Clayton, 27, of Ridgehill Avenue in West Baltimore, was arrested Wednesday.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | December 11, 2008
On visits to several county schools in recent days, Du Gun was surprised to see principals out of their offices mingling with students and teachers. She was struck by the fact that teachers and students interact as much as they do. And she was impressed by how special-needs students and other students are taught in one classroom. Gun, principal of an elementary school in Beijing, is among a group of educators from China who are visiting Howard County schools to learn more about American education.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | October 19, 2008
Lawrence E. "Larry" Walker, Sr., 50, had always been involved in the schools his two sons attended, but when they entered high school he and other fathers began to see the need to mentor African-American boys there. Last spring, he won the first Comcast Parent Involvement Matters Award, given by the Maryland State Department of Education. Tell us a little bit about your background. I moved to Columbia at age 15 from the rough urban streets of Pittsburgh to live with my Aunt Marie and Uncle Haywood; they could only imagine the impact it would have on life.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts Jr | September 23, 2007
This week, it is 50 years since the 101st Airborne Division of the U.S. Army took nine children to school. American soldiers sworn to defend American soil and American interests had to descend upon an American city with bayonets fixed to protect American children from a mob of American adults screaming blood and murder at their attempt to attend an American school. Because, you see, the adults had pale skin, and the children's skin was dark. From the vantage point of half a century, it seems an absurd drama.
NEWS
By BRIAN SULLAM | June 30, 1996
IF WE WANT to solve the problems of our school systems, maybe we should restart the Cold War.When the Soviet Union launched Sputnik into space in October 1957, a complacent attitude about the nation's schools was transformed into one of deep concern.Almost 40 years later, American school systems are struggling, and very few of us are paying attention.A good indication of our lack of interest is the decrepit state of our many of our school buildings.Last week, the General Accounting Office, Congress' investigative arm, reported that nearly one-third of American schools are in need of major repair.
NEWS
By Rachel Marsden | December 31, 2012
After a tragedy like the Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre in Newtown, Conn., the injection of anything short of seriousness into the subsequent public discourse about guns is touchy. But the National Rifle Association blasted numerous rounds into that particular barrier with NRA Executive Vice President Wayne LaPierre's mouth. The organization's hysteric solution to gun violence in America is to put designated sitting ducks - er, "armed police officers" - in every American school.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | July 1, 2004
On Dec. 4, 1831, 10-year-old Mary Pets put the last of hundreds and hundreds of elegant stitches in a sampler she made for "her dear parents" while a pupil at the School for Colored Girls of the Oblate Sisters of Providence. Mary Pets' sampler is still in the archives of the Oblate Sisters, at their mother house west of Arbutus, the oldest in the Sisters' collection definitely made by one of their students. The only older sampler known to be by an Oblate pupil is in the Maryland Historical Society.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Lem Satterfield,SUN STAFF | November 12, 2003
Making adjustments is nothing new for Joseph Toto. He has gone from being the go-to guy at Milford Mill in the lowest division of the Baltimore County soccer leagues to being a contributor on an Archbishop Curley High squad that competes in Baltimore's premier conference and was ranked as high as No. 3 nationally. The Liberian native has gone from a public school where, Toto said, wearing designer clothes and impressing female classmates was the norm, to a Catholic boys school where the dress code requires slacks, button-down shirts and ties.
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