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January 14, 2013
Members of the Governor William Paca Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution – from left, Emily Andrews, Dotty Meyer, Barbara Adams and Ginny Carlin – accept a proclamation from Harford County Executive Mr. David Craig proclaiming Constitution Week in Harford County the week of Sept. 17 to 23. This is the 225th anniversary of the Constitution. In 1955 DAR petitioned Congress to set aside the week of September 17-23 to honor the Constitution and the petition was signed into law by President Eisenhower the next year.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2014
Virginia L. Evans, a former Army nurse who while serving in Europe during World War II cared for Gen. George S. Patton Jr., died Sept. 24 at Hope Hospice in Coral Gables, Fla., of renal failure. She was 98. The daughter of Leonard Schmidt, a tailor, and Ascensia Schmidt, the former Virginia Lucille Schmidt was born and raised in Indianapolis, where she graduated from public schools. Mrs. Evans was a 1938 graduate of St. Vincent's Hospital School of Nursing in Indianapolis, where she earned her nursing degree.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2011
Ina W. Hubard, a homemaker who had been an active member of the Daughters of the American Revolution throughout her life, died April 13 of heart failure at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Lutherville resident was 94. Ina Walker, the daughter of a career Navy officer and a homemaker, was born and raised in Annapolis. She attended the Georgetown Visitation Preparatory School and graduated from the old Gunston Hall School in 1934. Two years later, she married Randolph Bolling Hubard, a West Point graduate and career Army officer.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Born and raised here, a true "Son of Baltimore," I have witnessed the evolution and controversy of the "O!" sung during "The Star-Spangled Banner" since its origins in the cheap seats of Memorial Stadium some 30-plus years ago ( "Stop desecrating the anthem," Sept. 18). To those who accuse us of disrespect and desecration, I have the following to say. My family, like many, came to the docks of Locust Point poor and hopeful and never left - the immigrant working-class backbone of a young country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | February 7, 1992
If The American Revolution Tavern and Rugby Pub ever held a slogan contest, an appropriate entry would be: "Give me rugby or give me death!"Make what you will of the unusual merger of history and sports, but this upstairs-downstairs operation features a first-floor tavern evoking the colonial period and a sportier second-floor pub that also serves as a meeting room for the 75-member Chesapeake Bay Rugby Club.Frankly confused, I called the manager of this new midtown bar, Gonzalo Jouan, for a sporting explanation.
NEWS
By Michael James and Michael James,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1996
Carrying out the cryptic last wishes of a reclusive multimillionaire, a Baltimore County court ended a battle of wills yesterday and awarded nearly $1 million of the fortune to the Daughters of the American Revolution.The will of Olive Swindells -- a Lochearn resident who died in squalor in March despite having amassed a $4.4 million stock portfolio -- had pitted the DAR and Gallaudet University against each other in a legal struggle for part of the riches.Mrs. Swindells' will left 80 percent of her estate to Gallaudet, the college for the deaf in Washington, and the remaining 20 percent to "the Daughters of the American Revolution Nursing Home for the use of the destitute members."
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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 1, 2012
Elizabeth Ann Daly, who was a past Maryland state regent of the Daughters of the American Revolution, died of congestive heart failure Monday at her Woodbine home. She was 91. Born Elizabeth Ann Prentiss in Baltimore and raised in Howard Park, she was a 1937 Forest Park High School graduate. She later attended Strayer Business College and went to work as a secretary. She married H. Kenneth Daly, a manufacturer's representative for science lab equipment, in 1941. They lived in Lochearn for many years.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | January 9, 2009
Emma Carroll, who established an antiques and consignment business at Glencoe Gardens in Baltimore County and headed the Daughters of the American Revolution in Maryland, died of a stroke Jan. 1 at her Sparks home. She was 90. Born Emma Mosner in Baltimore and raised on Walker Avenue, she was a 1936 Eastern High School graduate. She attended Towson University and was a Baltimore Business College graduate. She was office manager for the Prudential Insurance Co. many years ago. After her marriage to landscaper and Towson Nurseries owner William C. Price, she developed an antiques and Christmas decorating business at Glencoe Gardens, an 1830s brick and stone barn that stands on the west side of York Road in Sparks.
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | July 3, 2014
The celebration of America's birthday rarely includes references to Thomas Paine, the author of the pre-Revolutionary War pamphlet "Common Sense. " But Paine's role in the break with Great Britain was important, and his life has a way of reminding us that our nation has had enormous tolerance for wayward individuals - a sobering contrast to the consistent propriety exemplified by history-makers such as George Washington or John Adams. Paine was born in 1737 in Thetford, a village 70 miles northeast of London, the son of a staymaker or corsetmaker.
NEWS
By Will Englund and Will Englund,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 22, 2000
SHCHERBINKA, Russia - The people who run this little city a few miles south of Moscow want to put it on the map and figure that John Paul Jones is just the man to do it for them. Here - across from the railroad tracks, next to the new church built by a philanthropic entrepreneur, not far from the Otis Elevator factory, and about 500 miles from the nearest salt water - Shcherbinka hopes to raise a memorial to the fiery hero of the American Revolution. John Paul Jones? The one who's buried at the Naval Academy in Annapolis?
NEWS
By Thomas V. DiBacco | July 3, 2014
The celebration of America's birthday rarely includes references to Thomas Paine, the author of the pre-Revolutionary War pamphlet "Common Sense. " But Paine's role in the break with Great Britain was important, and his life has a way of reminding us that our nation has had enormous tolerance for wayward individuals - a sobering contrast to the consistent propriety exemplified by history-makers such as George Washington or John Adams. Paine was born in 1737 in Thetford, a village 70 miles northeast of London, the son of a staymaker or corsetmaker.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg, For The Baltimore Sun | May 24, 2014
With his fife's high-pitched notes soaring over the enthusiastic throngs that gather each year at historic sites to celebrate Memorial Day, Dave Embrey is an attention-getter. Clad in historically accurate attire, the longtime Savage resident performs on one of his walnut or rosewood fifes, depending on which war he is helping to commemorate. The notes of the piccolo-like instrument enhance the 15 or so ceremonies he participates in each year. Welcome to the world of re-enacting with "Fifer Dave," whose musical talent and passion for living history have made him a regular at the National Memorial Day Parade in the nation's capital and at other locales from Mount Vernon to Fort McHenry.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2014
Molly O. Molter, the last surviving member of the family that owned Owens Yacht Co., who was known as "The Lady Boat Builder," died May 2 of respiratory failure at Genesis Eldercare Spa Creek Center in Annapolis. She was 104. The daughter of Charles C. Owens, a vice president of Westinghouse Electric Corp., and Mary Agnes Glynn Owens, a homemaker, the former Molly Glynn Owens was born in Brooklyn, N.Y., and moved with her family to Detroit in 1912. In 1925, they settled in Annapolis, where Mrs. Molter graduated from high school.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
On Easter Sunday 75 years ago -- April 9, 1939 -- Marian Anderson gave a concert on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial for a crowd of about 75,000 who braved the cool weather, and a huge national audience listening on radio. The African American contralto, who, Arturo Toscanini famously said, had a voice "such as one hears once in a hundred years," had been barred by segregationist policies from singing at Constitution Hall, run by the Daughters of the American Revolution. With help from the FDR Administration, Lincoln Memorial was made available to Anderson as an alternate site.
NEWS
January 24, 2014
Sunday, Jan. 26 Theater Final performance of "Shrek the Musical" will be held at 2 p.m. at the Children's Theatre of Annapolis, 1661 Bay Head Road. Tickets are $12-$15. Information: 410-757-2281 or childrenstheatreofannapolis.org. Monday, Jan 27 Photo club The Digital Photography Club of Annapolis meets at 7 p.m. at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, 801 Chase St. in Annapolis. Information: 410-267-0461 or digitalphotoclub.net. Wednesday, Jan. 29 Luncheon series Sculptor Kelly Richard will speak on "Not Your Mama's Papier-Mache" at the Shady Side Rural Heritage Society's Winter Luncheon Series at the Captain Salem Avery House Museum, 1418 E. West Shady Side Road.
NEWS
November 23, 2013
I've lived in Maryland for my entire life, and I didn't even know that Frederick County had its own holiday on November 23rd until this week. On this week's episode of J. Doug at Night , House of Delegates candidate Darren Wigfield introduced us to the concept of Repudiation Day, the first act of defiance by British Colonists against the stamp act. The day was made a holiday by the Maryland General Assembly during its 1894 session....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ray Raphael and By Ray Raphael,Special to the Sun | May 29, 2005
1776 By David McCullough. Simon & Schuster, 386 pages, $32. Opening Words "On the afternoon of Thursday, October 26, 1775, His Royal Majesty George III, King of England, rode in royal splendor from St. James Palace to the Palace of Westminster, there to address the opening of Parliament on the increasingly distressing issue of war in America." 1776, by David McCullough In Revolutionary days, when people objected to decisions reached in official chambers, they resolved issues on their own "out-of-chambers," as they said at the time.
NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | June 21, 2011
Forget hope and change; victimization is in. Dropped by the president and dismissed as a racist by many Americans, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright still draws crowds with his sometimes crotch-grabbing, always riveting soliloquies about black oppression. The former pastor of Barack Obama drew thousands last week to the 8,000-member Empowerment Temple in Baltimore City. Overflow lots at the church were filled, and five blocks on either side of the massive stadium-like stucco building in Park Heights - a part of town where Orthodox Jews mix sometimes uneasily with blacks - were wall to wall with cars.
EXPLORE
By Kevin Dayhoff, kevindayhoff@gmail.com | June 10, 2013
Friday, June 14, is Flag Day. It's a day in which we not only honor the flag of our nation, but also the freedom and the way of life it symbolizes. It was the Second Continental Congress, which sat in session from May 10, 1775 to March 1, 1781, which passed the Flag Act of 1777 on June 14, 1777, during the American Revolution. A representative from New Jersey, Francis Hopkinson, is accepted by history as having been the designer of the first flag. He was a poet and an artist who began serving on the Continental Navy Board in November 1776.
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May 15, 2013
At the Saturday, Feb. 9 Harbor of Grace Chapter meeting of the Daughters of the American Revolution, the membership was treated to a presentation by Dawn Fairchild, "Image of a Hero - Recreating George Washington's Revolutionary War Uniform. " Fairchild discussed her construction of George Washington's uniform using authentic materials. Her husband, Bill Myers, attended the meeting modeling one of the uniforms.
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