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NEWS
June 2, 2013
I adamantly disagree with former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s perspective on the Affordable Care Act ("Lost jobs, higher costs: Obamacare hits home," May 26). The real facts are clear. The Affordable Care Act is improving Maryland's fiscal and physical health right now. Since the law's enactment, more than 1.5 million people in Maryland now have access to no-cost preventive services, 2.2 million no longer have to worry about lifetime caps on coverage limits and 46,000 additional young people receive coverage from their parents' plans.
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NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
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NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
NEWS
June 2, 2013
I adamantly disagree with former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s perspective on the Affordable Care Act ("Lost jobs, higher costs: Obamacare hits home," May 26). The real facts are clear. The Affordable Care Act is improving Maryland's fiscal and physical health right now. Since the law's enactment, more than 1.5 million people in Maryland now have access to no-cost preventive services, 2.2 million no longer have to worry about lifetime caps on coverage limits and 46,000 additional young people receive coverage from their parents' plans.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | November 1, 2002
Dr. Georges Benjamin, Maryland's health secretary since 1999, has been selected to head the nation's leading organization of public health professionals, the group said yesterday. His selection as executive director of the 50,000-member American Public Health Association was announced in its November newsletter, which said he will assume the post in January. He was chosen from more than 70 candidates, the newsletter said. Benjamin, who was out of town yesterday, declined to comment on his appointment but said through a spokesman that he has no plans to leave his current position before the end of the year.
NEWS
October 26, 1990
Robert B. Mancke, a senior health educator with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, died Tuesday of pneumonia at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 47 and lived on Eutaw Place.A memorial service for Mr. Mancke was being held today at Brown Memorial Park Avenue Presbyterian Church, 1316 Park Ave.He had worked for the state since last year after serving since 1975 as director of the Bureau of Health Education and Promotion for the Baltimore Health Department.Before coming to the city, he held a similar post in Prince George's County for three years after starting in health education work with the state in 1967.
NEWS
September 13, 1999
Here is an excerpt of an editorial from the New York Times, which was published Friday.SINCE 1983, consumption of sugars and other caloric sweeteners by Americans has risen nearly 30 percent. Twenty years ago, children consumed twice as much milk as soda. Today the reverse is true. This national appetite for empty calories is crowding out important nutrients found in fruits, vegetables, whole grains and dairy products.Last month, a coalition of concerned nutrition experts and groups, including the American Public Health Association, urged the Food and Drug Administration to supply consumers who want to cut back on sugar with important information that is not now readily available to them.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,Staff Writer | January 30, 1994
An obituary Sunday on Eleanor L. McKnight Snyder incorrectly listed the name of one organization and deleted the ,, other. Memorial donations may be made to the Maryland Dietetics Association Foundation, 212 Witherspoon Road, Baltimore 21212, or Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 811 Cathedral Baltimore 21201.The Sun regrets the error.Eleanor L. McKnight Snyder, retired chief of the Division of Nutrition of the Baltimore Health Department, died of a heart attack Jan. 18 at her home in the Carrollton Condominiums in the city.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2001
Dr. Helen Abbey, a retired Johns Hopkins University professor, died Sunday of pneumonia at Stella Maris Hospice. She was 85 and lived in Towson. A professor of biostatistics at the School of Hygiene and Public Health, Dr. Abbey taught generations of public health scientists from 1949 until ill health forced her retirement in 1999. She also wrote scholarly articles on medical genetics and chronic diseases. Dr. Abbey was recalled as a teacher who spoke clearly and with enthusiasm for her subject.
NEWS
March 26, 1992
Harriette Dryden Vera, retired director of research and quality control for Becton Dickinson Microbiology Systems and an expert on culture media for growing bacteria, died of pneumonia March 14 at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center.A memorial service for Dr. Vera, who was 83, will be held at 3 p.m. tomorrow at Edenwald, 800 Southerly Road, the Towson retirement community where she lived.She retired 10 years ago after holding the same post since going to work for what was the Baltimore Biological Laboratory in the early 1940s.
NEWS
December 25, 1990
A memorial service for Dr. George Entwisle, a retired medical researcher and former professor at the University of Maryland medical school, will be held at 7 p.m. Thursday in the chapel of Towson Presbyterian Church.Dr. Entwisle died yesterday at Union Memorial Hospital from the complications of a stroke. He was 68.Born in Bolton, England, he emigrated to Boston with his parents as a boy. Dr. Entwisle attended the University of Massachusetts and received his medical degree from Boston University.
NEWS
March 6, 1994
Young, Dorsch elected to school's boardThe Maryland School for the Blind board of directors elected two new members at a recent meeting.Michael J. Young, vice president, finance for Carpet Fair Inc., has worked with other local nonprofit organizations such as the Baltimore Association of Retarded Citizens and the United Way of Central Maryland.A Bel Air resident and graduate of Towson State University, he is on Central Maryland chapter of the Association of Certified Public Accountants' executive committee.
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