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By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | September 17, 2006
Evelyn Foster Hill, a pioneering clinical psychologist who didn't begin practicing until her mid-50s, died Wednesday at the Brighton Gardens of Towson assisted-living facility, three months after suffering a stroke. She was 95. After twice putting family obligations before professional aspirations -- first to help out her parents in the Bronx, N.Y., during the Depression and then to raise children in Baltimore -- she enrolled at Goucher College in 1956 at age 45. Eight years later, she had a doctorate in psychology from the Catholic University of America in Washington.
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NEWS
By Ned Holstein | October 8, 2014
A little-noticed research revolution confirms that our family courts are damaging the health of our children on a daily basis. In 2014, three separate and independent groups of experts reviewed decades of child development research. They found that after parents separate or divorce, children do much better with shared parenting - joint custody - on multiple measures of wellbeing than with single parenting. Yet in more than eight out of 10 custody cases today, one parent (usually the mother)
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NEWS
By Staff Report | December 9, 1992
Dr. Saleem A. Shah, an expert on the law and mental health who died Nov. 25, was described yesterday as having helped establish forensic psychiatry as a specialty.Though himself a psychologist, the 60-year-old Catonsville resident had helped to establish the specialty and was instrumental in organizing the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law through a fellowship program he administered at the National Institute of Mental Health. At the time of his death, he was a senior scientist there.
NEWS
By Gadi Dechter and Gadi Dechter,Sun reporter | September 17, 2006
Evelyn Foster Hill, a pioneering clinical psychologist who didn't begin practicing until her mid-50s, died Wednesday at the Brighton Gardens of Towson assisted-living facility, three months after suffering a stroke. She was 95. After twice putting family obligations before professional aspirations -- first to help out her parents in the Bronx, N.Y., during the Depression and then to raise children in Baltimore -- she enrolled at Goucher College in 1956 at age 45. Eight years later, she had a doctorate in psychology from the Catholic University of America in Washington.
NEWS
March 26, 1998
Antonio Ribeiro,69, the Roman Catholic cardinal of Lisbon, Portugal, died Tuesday of cancer. He became active in movements that sought to adapt the church to modern times after the reforms of Vatican II. He was elevated to cardinal in 1971.John S. Alessio,87, who built a multimillion-dollar business empire and helped develop safety helmets for jockeys, died Tuesday of cancer in La Jolla, Calif. His holdings over the years included the Hotel del Coronado, Mr. A's restaurant, the Kona Kai Club and insurance, finance and investment companies.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1999
Warren S. Torgerson, a professor emeritus of psychology at the Johns Hopkins University who was internationally known for his work in psychological measurement, died Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after surgery resulting from a fall at his home in Fallston. He was 74.In 1964, Dr. Torgerson was appointed professor of psychology at Hopkins, and served as chairman of the department until 1969. He continued to teach quantitative psychology and the history of psychology until retiring in 1997.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Tribune News Service | September 5, 1995
You do not need to be a genius to look after yourself. Yet, millions of Americans suffer or die every year from diseases and accidents that they can clearly -- and easily -- prevent.Increasingly, psychologists are asking why they do not.Traffic accidents do not have genetic roots. No one has a predisposition to AIDS. Smoking-related lung cancer is not hereditary. And more: Women usually need abortions only when their pregnancies are unplanned. People get heart disease by not exercising and eating unhealthy food.
NEWS
By Ned Holstein | October 8, 2014
A little-noticed research revolution confirms that our family courts are damaging the health of our children on a daily basis. In 2014, three separate and independent groups of experts reviewed decades of child development research. They found that after parents separate or divorce, children do much better with shared parenting - joint custody - on multiple measures of wellbeing than with single parenting. Yet in more than eight out of 10 custody cases today, one parent (usually the mother)
FEATURES
February 28, 1992
The American Psychological Association says that TV programming re-enforces racial and gender stereotypes and places more value on women's looks than on competency. Callers to SUNDIAL agree. Of 260 callers, 158 (61 percent) said they believe television does indeed perpetuate stereotypes, and 177 (68 percent) agreed that women's roles are based more on looks than on talent."It's Your Call" represents a sampling of opinions from certain segments of the community, but it is not balanced demographically as would be done in a scientific public opinion poll.
FEATURES
By From staff reports | December 17, 1991
Free mental health counseling in the aftermath of natural disasters will be available as the result of a new agreement between the American Red Cross, American Psychological Association and the Maryland Psychological Association.Psychologists of the Maryland group will be on call to assist Red Cross relief operations when disasters are declared."We recognize that a crucial aspect of disaster relief, beyond providing food and shelter, is helping victims and survivors cope with their losses through compassionate mental health counseling," said Elizabeth H. Dole, Red Cross president, in announcing the agreement.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 7, 1999
Warren S. Torgerson, a professor emeritus of psychology at the Johns Hopkins University who was internationally known for his work in psychological measurement, died Monday at Johns Hopkins Hospital after surgery resulting from a fall at his home in Fallston. He was 74.In 1964, Dr. Torgerson was appointed professor of psychology at Hopkins, and served as chairman of the department until 1969. He continued to teach quantitative psychology and the history of psychology until retiring in 1997.
NEWS
March 26, 1998
Antonio Ribeiro,69, the Roman Catholic cardinal of Lisbon, Portugal, died Tuesday of cancer. He became active in movements that sought to adapt the church to modern times after the reforms of Vatican II. He was elevated to cardinal in 1971.John S. Alessio,87, who built a multimillion-dollar business empire and helped develop safety helmets for jockeys, died Tuesday of cancer in La Jolla, Calif. His holdings over the years included the Hotel del Coronado, Mr. A's restaurant, the Kona Kai Club and insurance, finance and investment companies.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder Tribune News Service | September 5, 1995
You do not need to be a genius to look after yourself. Yet, millions of Americans suffer or die every year from diseases and accidents that they can clearly -- and easily -- prevent.Increasingly, psychologists are asking why they do not.Traffic accidents do not have genetic roots. No one has a predisposition to AIDS. Smoking-related lung cancer is not hereditary. And more: Women usually need abortions only when their pregnancies are unplanned. People get heart disease by not exercising and eating unhealthy food.
NEWS
By Staff Report | December 9, 1992
Dr. Saleem A. Shah, an expert on the law and mental health who died Nov. 25, was described yesterday as having helped establish forensic psychiatry as a specialty.Though himself a psychologist, the 60-year-old Catonsville resident had helped to establish the specialty and was instrumental in organizing the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law through a fellowship program he administered at the National Institute of Mental Health. At the time of his death, he was a senior scientist there.
NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 20, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The American Psychological Association has adopted a resolution it hopes will limit treatment designed to change the behavior of homosexual men and women. Known as ''reparative therapy,'' the technique seeks to help homosexuals troubled by their lives.What's wrong with that, you might ask, so long as people are not coerced or intimidated?From the gay-rights lobby's point of view, there is plenty wrong. If homosexuals can change their behavior, then their argument for special protection under civil-rights laws designed for people whose status has nothing to do with behavior (racial minorities, women, the disabled)
NEWS
October 25, 2012
I was a little confused by Marie-Alberte Boursiquot's recent letter ("Catholic doctors for traditional marriage," Oct. 20). The headline over it says traditional marriage, but in her letter she uses the term "authentic marriage. " I had never heard that expression and neither Google or Wikipedia was of any help. Seems they have never heard it either. Ms. Boursiquot says that the best published scientific evidence indicates that marriage between one man and one woman in a stable relationship is the optimal situation for the healthy development of children.
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