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By Gregory Krolczyk | April 14, 1991
AMERICAN PSYCHO.Bret Easton Ellis.Vintage Contemporaries.399 pages. $11 (paperback).Patrick Bateman: the American Dream. He's in his mid-20s, living in a world where Armani, Hugo Boss, Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren rule. He uses his platinum AmEx card to snort cocaine in the bathrooms of the most elite clubs in New York, and makes daily trips to a health club that charges him only $5,000 a year for the privilege. He likes Genesis and Huey Lewis and the News, and watches the "Patty Winters Show" every day.He went to Harvard, then Harvard Business School.
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By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
For Duncan Sheik, June 7 will forever be a day mired in mixed emotions. It was then, earlier this year, that his seventh album, "Covers 80's," hit stores. The 12-track album features Sheik's deconstructions of his British new-wave favorites, such as New Order's "Low-Life" and Japan's "Gentlemen Take Polaroids. " As the 42-year-old singer-songwriter put it recently, the songs "seemed to capture that angst teenage moment I was going through in the '80s. " But on the day the album dropped, Sheik canceled his summer tour and entered a treatment center for alcohol addiction.
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By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | March 13, 1991
"American Psycho," by Bret Easton Ellis, 399 pages, Vintage Contemporaries, $11.AMERICAN Psycho," Bret Easton Ellis' slash and bash novel about a Wall Street serial killer, is this season's single most hated book.Feminists condemned it. So did the Wall Street Journal reviewer. Simon and Schuster, its first publisher, got cold feet and recalled it because of faulty taste. Vintage bought it on the rebound and now seems to hope nobody will notice.Both Gloria Steinem and Kate Millet are outraged.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
Things change. The film version of "American Psycho" opened Friday, becoming the weekend's No. 7 grossing movie at the box office and generating little outrage, although reviews were decidedly mixed. Mixed, however, is a step up for "American Psycho," which was pilloried when Bret Easton Ellis published it in 1991. The story of an '80s era Wall Street type who indulges in homicidal sprees, "American Psycho" prompted much outrage for its violence. Dropped by its original publisher, Simon & Schuster, the book sparked the National Organization for Women to call for a boycott and prompted a baker's dozen death threats against the author.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | December 8, 2011
For Duncan Sheik, June 7 will forever be a day mired in mixed emotions. It was then, earlier this year, that his seventh album, "Covers 80's," hit stores. The 12-track album features Sheik's deconstructions of his British new-wave favorites, such as New Order's "Low-Life" and Japan's "Gentlemen Take Polaroids. " As the 42-year-old singer-songwriter put it recently, the songs "seemed to capture that angst teenage moment I was going through in the '80s. " But on the day the album dropped, Sheik canceled his summer tour and entered a treatment center for alcohol addiction.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
All fears to the contrary, "American Psycho" does not mark the end of movies as we've come to know them. Directed and co-written with a sure and even-tempered hand by Mary Harron, "American Psycho" is a decidedly black farce that gets its point across just fine without dwelling on the gruesome killings and apparent anti-female sentiment that made Bret Easton Ellis' source novel such a pariah. Not that its central character, Wall Street hotshot Patrick Bateman, is the kind of guy you'd want to take home to mother (unless, perhaps, you're Norman Bates)
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | April 19, 2000
Things change. The film version of "American Psycho" opened Friday, becoming the weekend's No. 7 grossing movie at the box office and generating little outrage, although reviews were decidedly mixed. Mixed, however, is a step up for "American Psycho," which was pilloried when Bret Easton Ellis published it in 1991. The story of an '80s era Wall Street type who indulges in homicidal sprees, "American Psycho" prompted much outrage for its violence. Dropped by its original publisher, Simon & Schuster, the book sparked the National Organization for Women to call for a boycott and prompted a baker's dozen death threats against the author.
FEATURES
By Richard Bernstein and Richard Bernstein,New York Times | December 14, 1990
New York The few people who have actually read Bret Easton Ellis' novel "American Psycho," which has yet to be published, agree on one thing at least: There are descriptions of murder and sadism so gruesome and grisly that Simon & Schuster's decision not to publish the book on the grounds of taste is understandable.The novel certainly raises some deep questions about the capacity of a cultural product to shock and disturb.The main questions are these: Has a certain inconsistency, even degree of hypocrisy, entered the picture?
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | November 20, 1990
THERE WERE so many opportunities to reject Bret Easton Ellis' novel "American Psycho."There was the moment when the manuscript first landed on the editor's desk at Simon & Schuster, its pages filled with Armani ties, silk pumps, severed heads, nail guns, Bottega Veneta briefcases, mutilated corpses, microwave cannibalism and fabulous stereo equipment. There was the day when its editor gave excerpts from the most violent chapters to the editorial board, or the weeks when women at Simon & Schuster first read the novel and were appalled by its graphic descriptions of sexual torture-murders.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | June 10, 2005
High Tension is an inept Gallic version of an American psycho-killer/stalker movie. Intended for the global market - one girlfriend is French (Cecile De France), the other is American (Maiwenn Le Besco) - the action centers on a Yankee family's isolated French country home. The movie is a model of multinational incompetence, complete with dubbing and subtitling that criss-cross for no apparent reason. The picture tries to hook us with a shot of a working-class sadist (Philippe Nahon) who, after a sex act in his ugly van, tosses a female head from the driver's-side window.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | April 14, 2000
All fears to the contrary, "American Psycho" does not mark the end of movies as we've come to know them. Directed and co-written with a sure and even-tempered hand by Mary Harron, "American Psycho" is a decidedly black farce that gets its point across just fine without dwelling on the gruesome killings and apparent anti-female sentiment that made Bret Easton Ellis' source novel such a pariah. Not that its central character, Wall Street hotshot Patrick Bateman, is the kind of guy you'd want to take home to mother (unless, perhaps, you're Norman Bates)
NEWS
By Gregory Krolczyk | April 14, 1991
AMERICAN PSYCHO.Bret Easton Ellis.Vintage Contemporaries.399 pages. $11 (paperback).Patrick Bateman: the American Dream. He's in his mid-20s, living in a world where Armani, Hugo Boss, Brooks Brothers and Ralph Lauren rule. He uses his platinum AmEx card to snort cocaine in the bathrooms of the most elite clubs in New York, and makes daily trips to a health club that charges him only $5,000 a year for the privilege. He likes Genesis and Huey Lewis and the News, and watches the "Patty Winters Show" every day.He went to Harvard, then Harvard Business School.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | March 13, 1991
"American Psycho," by Bret Easton Ellis, 399 pages, Vintage Contemporaries, $11.AMERICAN Psycho," Bret Easton Ellis' slash and bash novel about a Wall Street serial killer, is this season's single most hated book.Feminists condemned it. So did the Wall Street Journal reviewer. Simon and Schuster, its first publisher, got cold feet and recalled it because of faulty taste. Vintage bought it on the rebound and now seems to hope nobody will notice.Both Gloria Steinem and Kate Millet are outraged.
FEATURES
By Richard Bernstein and Richard Bernstein,New York Times | December 14, 1990
New York The few people who have actually read Bret Easton Ellis' novel "American Psycho," which has yet to be published, agree on one thing at least: There are descriptions of murder and sadism so gruesome and grisly that Simon & Schuster's decision not to publish the book on the grounds of taste is understandable.The novel certainly raises some deep questions about the capacity of a cultural product to shock and disturb.The main questions are these: Has a certain inconsistency, even degree of hypocrisy, entered the picture?
NEWS
By Anna Quindlen | November 20, 1990
THERE WERE so many opportunities to reject Bret Easton Ellis' novel "American Psycho."There was the moment when the manuscript first landed on the editor's desk at Simon & Schuster, its pages filled with Armani ties, silk pumps, severed heads, nail guns, Bottega Veneta briefcases, mutilated corpses, microwave cannibalism and fabulous stereo equipment. There was the day when its editor gave excerpts from the most violent chapters to the editorial board, or the weeks when women at Simon & Schuster first read the novel and were appalled by its graphic descriptions of sexual torture-murders.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Venant Henry Scarupa, of The Sun's features staff, contributed to this article. and Elizabeth Venant Henry Scarupa, of The Sun's features staff, contributed to this article.,Los Angeles Times | December 14, 1990
Patrick Bateman is a Wall Street yuppie gone mad in the '80s who tortures, mutilates, rapes, murders, dismembers and even tries to make a meat loaf from the remains of one of his female victims.Bateman is the anti-hero of "American Psycho," the new novel by Bret Easton Ellis, who rose to national prominence five years ago with "Less Than Zero" and sank from sight with his second novel, "The Rules of Attraction." "American Psycho" has sparked torrid controversy in publishing circles and is now escalating into a national cause celebre, full of the sound and fury of moral outrage.
NEWS
By Dave Edelman | August 8, 1994
THE INFORMERS. By Bret Easton Ellis. Alfred A. Knopf. 226 pages. $22.SO WHAT do you do after you've written the sickest novel of the decade?That seems to be the defining question of Brat Pack writer Bret Easton Ellis' career these days, and it's not an easy one to answer. Three years ago, Mr. Ellis' incendiary novel "American Psycho," dominated the public imagination with its eerie depiction of a Wall Street hotshot who has a yen for blood. The scenes of female torture and mutilation -- which were widely misinterpreted as a sign of misogynistic tendencies on the part of the author himself -- turned thousands of stomachs and certainly caused more than one missed night of sleep.
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