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By Anthony Flint and Anthony Flint,BOSTON GLOBE | January 7, 1996
When Robert D. Putnam quit as dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government three years ago, he gave the usual line about wanting to return to life as a scholar. But it was no mere face-saving rhetoric.During the last year Mr. Putnam has become one of the leading academic observers of American political life, quoted by Anthony Lewis and George Will alike, even praised in the pages of People magazine.He's done it by grabbing hold of what promises to be a fundamental underlying issue in the next presidential campaign, and that is the cynicism and disaffection that keep so many Americans from engaging in any kind of civic or political activity today, much less actually casting a vote.
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NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 2, 2014
The Greens, the evangelical Christians who own 500 craft shops called Hobby Lobby, aren't the people on whom we should be focusing our anger this week. Neither is the Mennonite Hahn family, owners of Conestoga Wood Specialties They aren't the bad guys. The five male justices on the Supreme Court who supported the companies' refusal to provide contraceptive care to their female employees on religious grounds aren't the enemy here, either, although many might dispute that point.
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NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 23, 2013
President Barack Obama is right: All Americans could benefit from some soul-searching about race in America. This is not a message that many white Americans - or many nonwhite Americans - want to hear. The only thing people like less than being told to do some soul-searching is being told they're racist. In his speech last week following the George Zimmerman trial verdict, the president didn't use the term "racist," even if the label accurately applies to more of us than we care to admit.
NEWS
Thomas F. Schaller | July 23, 2013
President Barack Obama is right: All Americans could benefit from some soul-searching about race in America. This is not a message that many white Americans - or many nonwhite Americans - want to hear. The only thing people like less than being told to do some soul-searching is being told they're racist. In his speech last week following the George Zimmerman trial verdict, the president didn't use the term "racist," even if the label accurately applies to more of us than we care to admit.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | July 2, 2014
The Greens, the evangelical Christians who own 500 craft shops called Hobby Lobby, aren't the people on whom we should be focusing our anger this week. Neither is the Mennonite Hahn family, owners of Conestoga Wood Specialties They aren't the bad guys. The five male justices on the Supreme Court who supported the companies' refusal to provide contraceptive care to their female employees on religious grounds aren't the enemy here, either, although many might dispute that point.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- It has been political warfare with no winners. All those involved -- Republicans, Democrats, Congress, the president, the press and the voters -- have been losers.Both sides walk away from the impeachment of Bill Clinton with bitterness and anger as they face the possibility and perhaps the prospect of several ugly months ahead while the Senate deals with his case.Nor is it the usual sham anger that politicians employ for public consumption, then quickly put aside once an issue is settled.
FEATURES
By Scot Lehigh and Scot Lehigh,BOSTON GLOBE | September 28, 1997
Robert Reich, President Clinton's former labor secretary, and Jeff Faux, president of the Economic Policy Institute, have written cogent critiques of the Democratic status quo in the November-December issue of American Prospect. "How the debate is framed -- what options are put before the public -- makes all the difference," writes Reich, who contends that Democratic timidity has, in a few short years, telescoped the debate from the high purpose of whether to provide universal health care to a wrangle on Republican turf over how taxes should best be cut.Why has the Democratic Party become so quiescent?
BUSINESS
By Julius Westheimer | April 28, 1999
SUGGESTIONS for wiser investing:"Despite recent underperformance, small-cap stocks belong in all portfolios. This bull market has been driven by large-company stocks but small caps have outperformed large-cap stocks over time and may do so again." (ARS Financial Services)"If you put 10 percent of a $70,000 salary in a 401(k) with a 50 percent employer match on the first 6 percent you contribute, and your investment grows at a modest 10 percent annual rate, by year-end your money will have almost doubled.
NEWS
By Don Aucoin and Don Aucoin,BOSTON GLOBE | November 24, 1996
The sunstruck hordes staggering through Disney World might be surprised to learn of the ruthless corporate culture lurking behind Mickey and Goofy.That culture is the setting of a piece in the December Vanity Fair about the slow-motion humiliation of erstwhile Hollywood super-agent Michael Ovitz, who has struggled to stay afloat as president of Walt Disney Co.Plainly, the long knives are out for Ovitz. Just look at the number of Disney executives eager to tell co-authors Bryan Burrough and Kim Masters about Ovitz's misguided projects, petty power trips (employing half a dozen secretaries, keeping limo drivers on call even when he wasn't going anywhere)
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | May 22, 1991
Washington. -- Is there a growing epidemic of crime? Of starving American children? Of dead babies? Of ill-educated teen-agers? Or is it a growing epidemic of media mindlessness and maliciousness?Data-doctoring has long been an American public-policy disaster. It comes with the noble territory of a free press and free politics. But is statistics-spinning getting worse? Can something done?In recent weeks, we heard:* That the violent crime rate is going up.* That ''a startling number of American children [are]
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 20, 1998
WASHINGTON -- It has been political warfare with no winners. All those involved -- Republicans, Democrats, Congress, the president, the press and the voters -- have been losers.Both sides walk away from the impeachment of Bill Clinton with bitterness and anger as they face the possibility and perhaps the prospect of several ugly months ahead while the Senate deals with his case.Nor is it the usual sham anger that politicians employ for public consumption, then quickly put aside once an issue is settled.
NEWS
By Anthony Flint and Anthony Flint,BOSTON GLOBE | January 7, 1996
When Robert D. Putnam quit as dean of Harvard's Kennedy School of Government three years ago, he gave the usual line about wanting to return to life as a scholar. But it was no mere face-saving rhetoric.During the last year Mr. Putnam has become one of the leading academic observers of American political life, quoted by Anthony Lewis and George Will alike, even praised in the pages of People magazine.He's done it by grabbing hold of what promises to be a fundamental underlying issue in the next presidential campaign, and that is the cynicism and disaffection that keep so many Americans from engaging in any kind of civic or political activity today, much less actually casting a vote.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | April 29, 1991
Washington. - I subscribe to many small journals and to the Small Journal Theory of History, which is: Such publications are incubators of the large ideas that are history's propellant. The recent founding by some liberals of The American Prospect was politically significant as a sign that at least some of the liberal remnant have noticed how important The Public Interest has been in the vigor of conservatism.The American Prospect grapples with a subject that has helped to make liberalism unpalatable to many Americans.
FEATURES
By Maureen Ryan and Maureen Ryan,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 13, 2003
It's a classic dream come true: A young would-be writer from a small town in Alabama comes to New York City, and within months of penning her first words for a hot new publication, she's snatched up by a big-time magazine. But there's a high-tech twist to this story. The publication that got Elizabeth Spiers her job at New York magazine never saw print. Her witty synthesis of media news and celebrity gossip was showcased on a frequently updated Web log (or "blog") called Gawker.com, which made its debut late last year and soon became a daily stop for more than 40,000 Web surfers, including much of Manhattan's media elite.
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