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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 23, 2000
Usually, when it gets to be boxed-set time for an artist, the idea is to assemble a selection of songs that sums up just what made this person a star. It's a statement of identity, a portrait in sound. But what Johnny Cash ended up with, after compiling the tunes for the three-CD set "Love, God, Murder" (ColumbiaAmericanLegacy 63809, arriving in stores today), wasn't the definitive statement on his own career, but a summation of country music itself. In this collection, Cash -- who chose every song personally -- reduces his career to three themes.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Lester S. Levy bagged his first-edition copy of "The Star-Spangled Banner" in 1940 for $170, appreciably less than an anonymous buyer plunked down — $506,5000 — 70 years later on Dec. 3 at Christie's Auction House in New York, for the rare two-page piece of sheet music, one of 11 copies extant. My colleague, Chris Kaltenbach, writing in The Baltimore Sun, reported that the sale doubled its pre-auction estimates and set a world record for a single piece of sheet music.
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NEWS
March 26, 1993
AMONG the qualities that made a star of singer Billy Eckstine, who died of a stroke earlier this month at age 78, were a velvet voice, a sophisticated musical ear and an unerring sense of style.He was one of the first great crossover artists, effortlessly crossing the arbitrary racial boundaries that segregated pop music of the 1930s and '40s. That he was enormously talented, and good looking as well, made those barriers seem all the more irrelevant.Mr. Eckstine came of age as a performer during a period of intense musical ferment.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2002
Music director J. Ernest Green ushered in the Annapolis Chorale's 30th season with a pops concert illustrating the art form that is American popular music. The chorale and Chamber Orchestra's program covered the golden age of the Broadway musical, from Jerome Kern's ground-breaking Showboat of 1927, through Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story and Rodgers and Hammerstein's Sound of Music. Although every song on the program was first heard more than 40 years ago, we seemed to be hearing many for the first time in contemporary arrangements.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 31, 2002
Music director J. Ernest Green ushered in the Annapolis Chorale's 30th season with a pops concert illustrating the art form that is American popular music. The chorale and Chamber Orchestra's program covered the golden age of the Broadway musical, from Jerome Kern's ground-breaking Showboat of 1927, through Leonard Bernstein's West Side Story and Rodgers and Hammerstein's Sound of Music. Although every song on the program was first heard more than 40 years ago, we seemed to be hearing many for the first time in contemporary arrangements.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 11, 2010
Lester S. Levy bagged his first-edition copy of "The Star-Spangled Banner" in 1940 for $170, appreciably less than an anonymous buyer plunked down — $506,5000 — 70 years later on Dec. 3 at Christie's Auction House in New York, for the rare two-page piece of sheet music, one of 11 copies extant. My colleague, Chris Kaltenbach, writing in The Baltimore Sun, reported that the sale doubled its pre-auction estimates and set a world record for a single piece of sheet music.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | February 2, 2006
If you're wondering like me why they brought the Super Bowl to Motown and then decided to book The Rolling Stones as the headline act of the glitzy Super Bowl halftime show, maybe we'll all find out today at the glitzy Super Bowl halftime show news conference. Don't blame Detroit. That was an NFL decision. It seems to me that there are a few local acts that might have been more appropriate, since this is one of the capital cities of American popular music, but I'm guessing that NFL officials went for the Stones because they were a safe choice with broad appeal that stretched across generational lines.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 15, 1992
A rare appearance by Harry Belafonte will be the highlight of an unusually glittering Baltimore Symphony Orchestra pops lineup next season.Belafonte, who will appear without the BSO, is one of the truly legendary figures in American popular music: He was the first singer to sell more than 1 million copies of an individual album, the first African-American to win an Emmy, and he was also a Tony winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center award.Other performers on the 1992-'93 roster, which the BSO released Wednesday, include the famed a cappella group the Swingle Singers, composer-conductor Henry Mancini, the Smothers Brothers comedy team and BSO music director David Zinman, who will lead the orchestra in music from "Porgy and Bess" and "Carmen Jones."
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | May 14, 1992
A rare appearance by Harry Belafonte will be the highlight of an unusually glittering Baltimore Symphony Orchestra pops lineup next season.Belafonte, who will appear without the BSO, is one of the truly legendary figures in American popular music: He was the first singer to sell more than 1 million copies of an individual album, he was the first African-American to win an Emmy, and he was also a Tony winner and a recipient of the Kennedy Center award.Other...
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 10, 1993
Helen O'Connell, the petite singer who along with Bob Eberly formed one of the most enduring duos in American popular music, died yesterday at a San Diego hospice.Her manager, Gloria Burke, said she was 73. With her when she died was her husband, Frank DeVol, the orchestra leader, arranger and composer, and three of her four daughters.Most recently she had become identified as a soloist, appearing throughout the country either on her own or with "ghost bands," who represented the remnants of the grandeur of dance music in the 1930s and '40s.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 23, 2000
Usually, when it gets to be boxed-set time for an artist, the idea is to assemble a selection of songs that sums up just what made this person a star. It's a statement of identity, a portrait in sound. But what Johnny Cash ended up with, after compiling the tunes for the three-CD set "Love, God, Murder" (ColumbiaAmericanLegacy 63809, arriving in stores today), wasn't the definitive statement on his own career, but a summation of country music itself. In this collection, Cash -- who chose every song personally -- reduces his career to three themes.
NEWS
March 26, 1993
AMONG the qualities that made a star of singer Billy Eckstine, who died of a stroke earlier this month at age 78, were a velvet voice, a sophisticated musical ear and an unerring sense of style.He was one of the first great crossover artists, effortlessly crossing the arbitrary racial boundaries that segregated pop music of the 1930s and '40s. That he was enormously talented, and good looking as well, made those barriers seem all the more irrelevant.Mr. Eckstine came of age as a performer during a period of intense musical ferment.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt | October 1, 1995
AMERICANS COMPLAIN constantly about the quality and content of their popular music. It is said to be vulgar, vicious, venal, cheap, superficial, noisy and inimical to the moral progress of society. In every decade from ragtime to rap, the verdict has been the same: Pop music is ruining the country.Yet here's the strange thing: From the earliest days of sheet music and piano rolls to the era of digital compact discs, those same complaining Americans continue to buy pop music in staggering quantities -- and so does much of the rest of the world.
NEWS
January 27, 1993
The body of religious songs popularly known as gospel music is by now so familiar to most Americans that they seem like collective creations, part of our national folk heritage.In fact, gospel music was the self-conscious product of many individual composers, of whom perhaps the most prolific and original was Chicago songwriter Thomas A. Dorsey, who died Sunday at the age of 93.Since at least the time of Martin Luther, who insisted that "the devil shouldn't have all the good tunes," religious songwriters have turned to popular music for inspiration.
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