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Editorial from The Aegis | March 27, 2014
It's the kind of power play that crops up when voters aren't paying close attention. The Republicans Harford County elected to the Maryland House of Delegates have introduced a legislative measure that would give them standing in certain matters that are decided by the county's Republican Central Committee. Ordinarily, it's the kind of move that has all the significance of re-arranging the deck furniture on a ship that isn't in any danger whatsoever. The reality of local politics is that the county central committees have rather limited roles in matters of public policy.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | April 9, 2014
Last week a majority of the Supreme Court decided that the First Amendment protects the right of individuals to pour as much as $3.6 million into a political party or $800,000 into a political campaign. The court said such spending doesn't corrupt democracy. That's utter baloney, as anyone who has the faintest familiarity with contemporary American politics well knows. The McCutcheon v. FEC decision would be less troubling were the distribution of income and wealth in America more equal.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 10, 2012
Going by the conventional rules of American politics, the Democratic Convention this week was an unmitigated disaster. And, going by the same rules, GOP convention was a disaster, too. So, either the rules of American politics have fundamentally changed, or at least one of the parties is taking an enormous gamble. Since the Nixon years, the GOP has enjoyed a marked advantage over the Democrats at the presidential level. Cultural issues -- race, religion, abortion, patriotism -- have worked to the Republicans' advantage.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | March 27, 2014
It's the kind of power play that crops up when voters aren't paying close attention. The Republicans Harford County elected to the Maryland House of Delegates have introduced a legislative measure that would give them standing in certain matters that are decided by the county's Republican Central Committee. Ordinarily, it's the kind of move that has all the significance of re-arranging the deck furniture on a ship that isn't in any danger whatsoever. The reality of local politics is that the county central committees have rather limited roles in matters of public policy.
NEWS
February 12, 2005
IT'S A GOOD BET that many if not most of the obituaries for Arthur Miller will work in one of the playwright's most well-known and anguished lines: "Attention must be paid." That's Linda Loman saying it, wife of Willy and mother of Biff and Happy, and she is bringing to it a mixture of distress and outrage over the hand her husband has been dealt. She had faith in him, even if he didn't - and what about everyone else? Death of a Salesman is about a discarded life, and it is a particularly American story.
FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | March 7, 2000
With all the grousing about the negative tone of the presidential campaign this year, one might well wonder how the Founding Fathers would react to the sniping and back-biting. They'd probably say something like this to today's candidates: YOU CREAM-PUFFS! YOU MILKSOPS! You don't know the first thing about negative campaigning! Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Alexander Hamilton, those are guys who could talk about what it's really like to get slammed. George W. Bush and Al Gore might feel aggrieved, but no one has yet called either of them a whoremonger, a charge Jefferson endured.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein | June 16, 1999
WASHINGTON -- Like converging weather systems, the old and new politics of gun control collided over Michigan this spring. Predictably, turbulence followed.Michigan has long been a stronghold of the National Rifle Association and few were surprised when the state legislature approved bills that would make it easier for state residents to carry concealed weapons -- a top NRA priority.Then came the shootings at Columbine High School in Littleton, Colo. Suddenly the weather changed. A formidable alliance of Michigan gun-control advocates announced that, if the bill became law, they would place a repeal referendum on next November's ballot.
NEWS
By J. Joseph Curran Jr | September 30, 2004
AFTER SERVING in the Air Force and in public service for nearly five decades, I have learned a few things about how people in politics use what is best in human nature to promote a sense of unity and purpose among their constituents and their countrymen. Unfortunately, I also have seen how people in politics use the worst elements of human nature not to better their country -- or even themselves -- but to hurt, or even destroy, others. We are seeing far too much of this in American politics these days, and this may be worth noting as the candidates for president embark tonight on the first of their three debates.
NEWS
August 22, 2004
Pendleton Herring, 100, a political scientist, writer and foundation executive who did pioneering work in the study of American politics, died Tuesday of pneumonia at his home in Princeton, N.J. He was born in Baltimore and received a bachelor's degree in English and a doctorate in political science from the Johns Hopkins University. As a scholar, he worked to understand the basic mechanics of government and to apply rigor to the emerging study of political science. Group Representation before Congress (Johns Hopkins, 1929)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Paul Taylor and Paul Taylor,Special to the Sun | July 25, 2004
Fat Man Fed Up: How American Politics Went Bad, by Jack W. Germond. Random House. 211 pages. $24.95. Jack Germond has been covering politics for a half a century and is among a handful of reporters for whom the adjective legendary is no stretch. He's a wonderful storyteller. He's got a great pair of ears, each with its own deadly bull detector. Best of all -- as anyone can attest who's read his columns in the Baltimore Sun or watched him crack wise on television -- he knows that the most productive way to watch the game of politics is with a naughty twinkle.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 18, 2013
One of the great things about American politics is its capacity for punishing hubris. For the ancient Greeks, hubris didn't merely describe god-like arrogance. It was a crime, usually defined as taking too much pleasure in the humiliation of your foes. In its modern usage it usually means the pride that comes before the fall. In the wake of Barack Obama's State of the Union address, both connotations seem at least a little apt. We are well into our fourth month of epidemic thumb-suckery over the question, "Are the Republicans doomed?"
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | October 25, 2012
One of the striking aspects of the third presidential debate was the frequent mention of Israel (34 times). Western Europe and the challenges facing the European Union or Latin America hardly registered. It is as if the Israel issue is a burning one in American politics, or that the American public is dying to see which candidate supports Israel more. Neither is close to the truth. Even aside from the fact that Americans are not much focused on foreign policy in any case in determining their electoral choices, the Israel issue is often misunderstood.
NEWS
Robert L. Ehrlich Jr | September 24, 2012
Some pundits are bemoaning the unremarkable one-year anniversary of the "Occupy" movement's entry into American politics. Indeed, it was not so long ago that daily street protests were the object of intense media coverage. For many progressives, hopes were high. Some viewed the angst-ridden movement as a convenient adjunct for the president's re-election campaign. The timing seemed perfect. Here was another opportunity to attack capitalism and all those wealthy folks who never seem to pay their "fair share.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 10, 2012
Going by the conventional rules of American politics, the Democratic Convention this week was an unmitigated disaster. And, going by the same rules, GOP convention was a disaster, too. So, either the rules of American politics have fundamentally changed, or at least one of the parties is taking an enormous gamble. Since the Nixon years, the GOP has enjoyed a marked advantage over the Democrats at the presidential level. Cultural issues -- race, religion, abortion, patriotism -- have worked to the Republicans' advantage.
NEWS
By Leonard Pitts | July 29, 2012
It was in 2008, the debate between vice-presidential candidates Joe Biden and Sarah Palin. Mr. Biden had just scored his opponent for failing to directly answer a question from moderator Gwen Ifill. But Ms. Palin was hardly apologetic. "I may not answer the questions the way that either the moderator or you want to hear," she snapped, "but I'm going to talk straight to the American people and let them know my track record also. " In other words, she felt no particular obligation to answer the questions she was asked.
NEWS
August 28, 2011
Del. Ron George from Annapolis objects to those who make light of the anti-Sharia movement in the U.S. ("Sharia law is a real threat to American liberties," Aug. 24.) He argues that imposing Sharia law is the stated goal of Islamic extremists like al-Qaeda, Hezbollah, the Taliban and Hamas. He may be right, but how does that lead to the conclusion that we in the U.S. are threatened by the imposition of Sharia law in this country? As a Republican, Delegate George surely doesn't believe that the Taliban, al-Qaida, Hamas or Hezbollah are poised to overrun us and establish Sharia law here by force.
NEWS
By J. Craig Barnes | March 12, 1996
THEY'RE BACK. Quadrennially these scolds of the political landscape descend upon us. Not the presidential candidates the academics who would reform, rationalize and reduce the process of electing a president.They have two favorite notions: Shorten the campaign season, and eliminate political-action committees. As Sam Rayburn said of John Kennedy, I'd feel better if one of them had ever run for sheriff.First, the shorter campaign. Ninety days, they say, is enough. No, it's not. A year or more is just right.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | February 18, 2013
One of the great things about American politics is its capacity for punishing hubris. For the ancient Greeks, hubris didn't merely describe god-like arrogance. It was a crime, usually defined as taking too much pleasure in the humiliation of your foes. In its modern usage it usually means the pride that comes before the fall. In the wake of Barack Obama's State of the Union address, both connotations seem at least a little apt. We are well into our fourth month of epidemic thumb-suckery over the question, "Are the Republicans doomed?"
NEWS
By Todd Eberly | October 24, 2010
There is a paradox at the center of contemporary American politics: Though the electorate is essentially moderate, our parties and elected officials are increasingly representative of political extremes. As a result, the era of elections as affirmation has ended. We are living in the era of elections as repudiation. There is little doubt that the 2010 midterm elections are going to produce sweeping political change in Washington and in statehouses across the United States. Just two years ago, pundits, politicians and political analysts were proclaiming the GOP's epitaph and the Democrats' resurgence.
NEWS
By Bruce Newsome | November 18, 2009
What has happened to democracies at war? Democratic nations used to avoid wars - but when they did engage, as in the two world wars and the Cold War, they usually emerged victorious. Now, however, democracies are mixed up in wars everywhere, and they will win few of them. Democracy is the problem, and the problem is getting worse. Historically, when democracies decided to fight, they would bring more allies and larger economies. Thus, they fought fewer wars but won more often.
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