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By Dave Rosenthal | October 12, 2012
The National Portrait Gallery's new exhibition, “Poetic Likeness: Modern American Poets,” uses portraiture, biography and verse to explore the people who created a distinctive, American voice. Walt Whitman's free verse in "Leaves of Grass," (1855), was a shocking departure from literary tradition, the museum notes -- both for its form and for the inclusion of topics that described ordinary life. (That mirrors the equally shocking mid-century shift to realism by painters such as Courbet in France.)
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By Dave Rosenthal | October 12, 2012
The National Portrait Gallery's new exhibition, “Poetic Likeness: Modern American Poets,” uses portraiture, biography and verse to explore the people who created a distinctive, American voice. Walt Whitman's free verse in "Leaves of Grass," (1855), was a shocking departure from literary tradition, the museum notes -- both for its form and for the inclusion of topics that described ordinary life. (That mirrors the equally shocking mid-century shift to realism by painters such as Courbet in France.)
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By H. B. Johnson Jr | March 7, 1994
SIX AMERICAN POETS. Edited by Joel Conarroe. VintageBooks/Random House. 281 pages. $12.TC I FINALLY did it! I finally got through a book that otherwise would not have been a chore. I have AIDS, you see. The eyes burn, and I get too quickly tired. But enough about that. I want to talk about something more life-giving and life-sustaining. I want to talk about poetry.The wife of a dear friend of mine sent me a delicious meal last week, and his son sent me a collection of books. I consumed everything with gratitude.
NEWS
By Matt Schudel, The Washington Post | March 28, 2012
Adrienne Rich, one of the country's most honored and influential poets, whose finely tuned verse explored her identity as a feminist, a lesbian and an agent for political change, died Tuesday at her home in Santa Cruz, Calif. She was 82. She died of complications from rheumatoid arthritis, said her son, Pablo Conrad. In more than 60 years as a published poet, Ms. Rich examined the evolving lives of women in modern society and embodied many of those changes herself. She was a precocious child of a privileged Baltimore family, then a young wife and mother, and later dedicated herself to the ideals of feminism.
NEWS
December 23, 1994
Morris WeinsteinLiquor store ownerMorris Weinstein, who owned Orye's Liquors at 25th Street and Kirk Avenue for 10 years before retiring about eight years ago, died Wednesday of cancer at Sinai Hospital.The Pikesville resident, 68, had earlier been the owner of Shoppers Liquors on Liberty Road in Rockdale and the Suburban Bar at Walbrook Junction.Born in Baltimore, the City College graduate served in the Navy aboard ships in the Atlantic during World War II.As a young man, he had played on the Monitor Club basketball team of the Jewish Educational Alliance.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
For an hour and a half yesterday, Bulgarian poet Lyubomir Nikolov brought some of his world to students at Howard High School. Nikolov is this year's poet-in-residence for the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society (HoCoPoLitSo) and has been touring local schools to share his poetry and experiences. Yesterday's presentation brought thunderous applause from students and teachers - even when Nikolov read his work in his native tongue. "It makes me think you all understood what I said," Nikolov said jokingly as he stood before a group crowded into one of the drama department rooms.
NEWS
By Robin T. Reid and Robin T. Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2000
At the end of a poetry reading not too long ago, a boy walked up to Billy Collins and handed him a baseball. He asked the poet to sign it. "It was already signed by [U.S. poet laureate] Robert Pinsky," Collins recalls. "He was a young kid who went to a lot of poetry readings and was assembling this poetry baseball. I'm not sure of what the line-up would have been." Collins and the other heavy hitters who had signed the ball may not be household names like the names normally scribbled on baseballs.
NEWS
By CLARINDA HARRISS and CLARINDA HARRISS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1996
Poetry is a bomb that frags you with metaphor, explodes in your head where it heals rather than harms, delights and provokes as well as horrifies. When they get imbedded, fragments stay inside you forever. Last year a college-text publishing company led off an ad campaign with huge posters that asked, "Without poetry, would you die?" Poets and poetry readers shook their heads - the question was all backwards. In order to take poetry away you'd have to kill them: it's locked within.Here's the perfect way to attract notice to the United States' first National Poetry Month, April 1996: Make a solemn vow not to use any metaphors all month.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | November 3, 2006
When talking about poet Lucille Clifton this week, two of her colleagues quoted the same line from her poem "won't you celebrate with me": "come celebrate / with me that everyday / something has tried to kill me / and has failed." In the past five years, Clifton, 70, has survived a kidney transplant, two types of cancer and the deaths of two of her children. But she is still on the literary scene writing, teaching and reading. "I think her will is very strong," said Michael Glaser, a friend and fellow poet.
NEWS
By Matt Schudel, The Washington Post | March 28, 2012
Adrienne Rich, one of the country's most honored and influential poets, whose finely tuned verse explored her identity as a feminist, a lesbian and an agent for political change, died Tuesday at her home in Santa Cruz, Calif. She was 82. She died of complications from rheumatoid arthritis, said her son, Pablo Conrad. In more than 60 years as a published poet, Ms. Rich examined the evolving lives of women in modern society and embodied many of those changes herself. She was a precocious child of a privileged Baltimore family, then a young wife and mother, and later dedicated herself to the ideals of feminism.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,sun reporter | November 3, 2006
When talking about poet Lucille Clifton this week, two of her colleagues quoted the same line from her poem "won't you celebrate with me": "come celebrate / with me that everyday / something has tried to kill me / and has failed." In the past five years, Clifton, 70, has survived a kidney transplant, two types of cancer and the deaths of two of her children. But she is still on the literary scene writing, teaching and reading. "I think her will is very strong," said Michael Glaser, a friend and fellow poet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Collier | January 26, 2003
I used to be able to figure out exactly which semester and year of my undergraduate days it was that I took a class from Robert Hayden, who was a visiting writer at my school in the early '70s, but I have lost track of the pebbles of data that had helped me pinpoint it. Instead, Hayden, who was legally blind, is located in a kind of eternal present: vivid to me in his glasses that are as thick and distorting of his eyes as a glass brick, holding the...
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
For an hour and a half yesterday, Bulgarian poet Lyubomir Nikolov brought some of his world to students at Howard High School. Nikolov is this year's poet-in-residence for the Howard County Poetry and Literature Society (HoCoPoLitSo) and has been touring local schools to share his poetry and experiences. Yesterday's presentation brought thunderous applause from students and teachers - even when Nikolov read his work in his native tongue. "It makes me think you all understood what I said," Nikolov said jokingly as he stood before a group crowded into one of the drama department rooms.
NEWS
By Robin T. Reid and Robin T. Reid,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 1, 2000
At the end of a poetry reading not too long ago, a boy walked up to Billy Collins and handed him a baseball. He asked the poet to sign it. "It was already signed by [U.S. poet laureate] Robert Pinsky," Collins recalls. "He was a young kid who went to a lot of poetry readings and was assembling this poetry baseball. I'm not sure of what the line-up would have been." Collins and the other heavy hitters who had signed the ball may not be household names like the names normally scribbled on baseballs.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 25, 1999
Like our renowned orchestras, the world's great string quartets have fashioned personalized reputations for their music-making.For songful elegance, it's hard to beat the Quartetto Italiano, which did remarkable things with Beethoven and Schubert a generation ago.The Guarneri Quartet conveys a larger-than-life presence with a passionate devotion to inner harmonic detail, while plummy sound and jewel-like precision continue to guarantee the Alban Berg Quartet...
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 18, 1999
The man in the second row doesn't like being called "African-American." The label is more exclusive than inclusive, he says. It doesn't leave room for his Native American and European ancestors."
NEWS
By LOURDES SULLIVAN | January 14, 1994
If you feel that your brain is slowly freezing, turning into mush or hibernating, come to the lively discussion series at the Savage Library this winter.Every Tuesday night from Feb. 15 through April 26, the library will be the site of a reading and discussion series entitled, "Reinventing American Poetry: Three Modern Voices."These aren't the convoluted verses of your junior high literature courses. These poets know how to pack a punch into simple language (nary an "o'er" among them).Come read and discuss the works of Emily Dickinson, whose poems have been edited yet again, Robert Frost and Elizabeth Bishop.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Sun Staff Writer | February 20, 1994
Four poets whose work is included in "Fast Talk, Full Volume," a new anthology of poetry by young African-American writers, will participate in a free poetry reading Mar. 1 at Irina's Cafe.Kenneth Carroll, Melvin Lewis, Brian Gilmore and Alan Spears will read selections from the anthology as well as from the body of their own work. The program will begin at 8:30 p.m. and will be followed by an open reading.Irina's Cafe is located at 32nd and Barclay streets in the Charles Village neighborhood; for details, call (410)
NEWS
By CLARINDA HARRISS and CLARINDA HARRISS,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 31, 1996
Poetry is a bomb that frags you with metaphor, explodes in your head where it heals rather than harms, delights and provokes as well as horrifies. When they get imbedded, fragments stay inside you forever. Last year a college-text publishing company led off an ad campaign with huge posters that asked, "Without poetry, would you die?" Poets and poetry readers shook their heads - the question was all backwards. In order to take poetry away you'd have to kill them: it's locked within.Here's the perfect way to attract notice to the United States' first National Poetry Month, April 1996: Make a solemn vow not to use any metaphors all month.
NEWS
December 23, 1994
Morris WeinsteinLiquor store ownerMorris Weinstein, who owned Orye's Liquors at 25th Street and Kirk Avenue for 10 years before retiring about eight years ago, died Wednesday of cancer at Sinai Hospital.The Pikesville resident, 68, had earlier been the owner of Shoppers Liquors on Liberty Road in Rockdale and the Suburban Bar at Walbrook Junction.Born in Baltimore, the City College graduate served in the Navy aboard ships in the Atlantic during World War II.As a young man, he had played on the Monitor Club basketball team of the Jewish Educational Alliance.
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