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By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Joseph Brodsky began his literary career in a country that took poetry seriously -- seriously enough to send him to a labor camp for writing it. In a Russian tradition that predated the Soviet era, his poems infuriated the authorities, turned him into a major public figure and attracted devoted readers who risked arrest merely by possessing underground copies of his work."
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By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | August 21, 2007
Four decades ago, an 11-year-old girl sat up front during a play at Center Stage. It was an English-language production of Moliere's comedy Tartuffe, and Mary Jo Salter reacted to the proceedings the way other girls her age might to the latest Nancy Drew mystery. "I was in the second row center, and people were speaking in rhyming couplets," says Salter, now 53. "I'd just never had so much fun in my life."
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | August 31, 2003
The Best American Poetry 2003, edited by Yusef Komunyakaa and David Lehman. Scribner. 288 pages. $16. In the introduction to this comprehensive, inspiring collection, poet Yusef Komunyakaa writes: "Whether attempting to see into the mystery of things or the human soul, poetry has long been the instrument and path." In this, the 17th edition of Scribner's American Poetry series, Komunyakaa and David Lehman spotlight the country's best bards. Initiated by Lehman for Scribner in 1988, the series is guest-edited by Komunyakaa, author of numerous books of poems, most of them about his experience in the Vietnam War. This edition includes a diverse and refreshing mix of award-winners and new voices, including the works of Billy Collins, Rita Dove, Stephen Dunn, W. S. Merwin and Robert Pinsky.
NEWS
August 16, 2004
William D. Ford, 77, a Democrat who dedicated himself to expanding educational opportunities for children while serving for three decades in Congress, died Saturday of complications from a stroke at his home in Ypsilanti Township, Mich. A House member from 1965 to 1995, he served as chairman of the House Committee on Education and Labor and as chairman of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service. He wrote the Middle Income Student Assistance Act and the Plant Closing Act and orchestrated the passage of the Family Medical Leave Act. In 1994 the Federal Direct Student Loan Program was named for him. A Navy veteran, he was a delegate to the Michigan Constitutional Convention and a member of the Michigan Senate before representing Michigan's 15th and 13th congressional districts.
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | December 20, 1992
THE BEST AMERICAN POETRY, 1992.Edited by Charles Simicand David Lehman.Scribner's.263 pages. $25."Every day men die from the lack of it . . . " said physician and poet William Carlos Williams. He could have been referring to an adequate diet, for instance. He certainly had lusty sympathy for the poor people he treated. But Williams was referring to poetry. Like physician and writer Anton Chekhov, Williams knew and felt the dangerous grittiness of life. Like Chekhov, he did not loll about on the narrow top of an ivory tower.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | October 2, 1994
A free performance of "Hamlet" by Shakespeare On Wheels, the traveling theater, is scheduled next weekend as part of an outdoor celebration of the new season of performing arts and visual-arts exhibitions at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Mona Van Duyn, a writer admired for her intelligence and wit, was named poet laureate of the United States yesterday.Her breadth can be seen in her latest collection, "Letters From a Father and Other Poems" (Atheneum), which presents images both of shared joy and the last decline of her aged parents, and in an observation of hers that might have sprung from Ogden Nash:The world's perverse,but it could have been worse.In announcing Ms. Van Duyn's selection, the librarian of Congress, James H. Billington, said, "I look forward to welcoming Ms. Van Duyn to the library, and I am particularly pleased to have a distinguished poet of such wide range joining us to promote public awareness of poetry and literature."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1998
WASHINGTON -- On this brilliant spring morning, poetry is not only in the air, Andrew Carroll is passing it out at the White House like, well, Johnny Appleseed planting trees.Carroll's on the first leg of his cross-country, National Poetry Month book tour, the Great APLseed Giveaway, a joint project of the Academy of American Poets and the American Poetry and Literacy Project (the APL of the giveaway), with the support from -- who else? -- apple growers.He's driving coast-to-coast in a Ryder rental truck filled with copies of "101 Great American Poems," "African American Poetry" and a couple of other anthologies.
NEWS
August 16, 2004
William D. Ford, 77, a Democrat who dedicated himself to expanding educational opportunities for children while serving for three decades in Congress, died Saturday of complications from a stroke at his home in Ypsilanti Township, Mich. A House member from 1965 to 1995, he served as chairman of the House Committee on Education and Labor and as chairman of the House Committee on Post Office and Civil Service. He wrote the Middle Income Student Assistance Act and the Plant Closing Act and orchestrated the passage of the Family Medical Leave Act. In 1994 the Federal Direct Student Loan Program was named for him. A Navy veteran, he was a delegate to the Michigan Constitutional Convention and a member of the Michigan Senate before representing Michigan's 15th and 13th congressional districts.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,sun reporter | August 21, 2007
Four decades ago, an 11-year-old girl sat up front during a play at Center Stage. It was an English-language production of Moliere's comedy Tartuffe, and Mary Jo Salter reacted to the proceedings the way other girls her age might to the latest Nancy Drew mystery. "I was in the second row center, and people were speaking in rhyming couplets," says Salter, now 53. "I'd just never had so much fun in my life."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight | August 31, 2003
The Best American Poetry 2003, edited by Yusef Komunyakaa and David Lehman. Scribner. 288 pages. $16. In the introduction to this comprehensive, inspiring collection, poet Yusef Komunyakaa writes: "Whether attempting to see into the mystery of things or the human soul, poetry has long been the instrument and path." In this, the 17th edition of Scribner's American Poetry series, Komunyakaa and David Lehman spotlight the country's best bards. Initiated by Lehman for Scribner in 1988, the series is guest-edited by Komunyakaa, author of numerous books of poems, most of them about his experience in the Vietnam War. This edition includes a diverse and refreshing mix of award-winners and new voices, including the works of Billy Collins, Rita Dove, Stephen Dunn, W. S. Merwin and Robert Pinsky.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 4, 1998
WASHINGTON -- On this brilliant spring morning, poetry is not only in the air, Andrew Carroll is passing it out at the White House like, well, Johnny Appleseed planting trees.Carroll's on the first leg of his cross-country, National Poetry Month book tour, the Great APLseed Giveaway, a joint project of the Academy of American Poets and the American Poetry and Literacy Project (the APL of the giveaway), with the support from -- who else? -- apple growers.He's driving coast-to-coast in a Ryder rental truck filled with copies of "101 Great American Poems," "African American Poetry" and a couple of other anthologies.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
"The United States of Poetry," a five-part, 2 1/2 -hour series debuting on MPT at 11 tonight, is not so much about verse as about diversity, about finding the artistic muse everywhere, about how all-encompassing the word "talent" is.Thus, this scattershot anthology of American poets embraces everyone from a freckle-faced Idaho third-grader to a woman of 70-plus years living in Arkansas with her husband and 50 cats. It features the work of a homeless man living in L.A. and a former president of the United States.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1996
Joseph Brodsky began his literary career in a country that took poetry seriously -- seriously enough to send him to a labor camp for writing it. In a Russian tradition that predated the Soviet era, his poems infuriated the authorities, turned him into a major public figure and attracted devoted readers who risked arrest merely by possessing underground copies of his work."
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | October 2, 1994
A free performance of "Hamlet" by Shakespeare On Wheels, the traveling theater, is scheduled next weekend as part of an outdoor celebration of the new season of performing arts and visual-arts exhibitions at the University of Maryland Baltimore County."
NEWS
By Stephen Margulies | December 20, 1992
THE BEST AMERICAN POETRY, 1992.Edited by Charles Simicand David Lehman.Scribner's.263 pages. $25."Every day men die from the lack of it . . . " said physician and poet William Carlos Williams. He could have been referring to an adequate diet, for instance. He certainly had lusty sympathy for the poor people he treated. But Williams was referring to poetry. Like physician and writer Anton Chekhov, Williams knew and felt the dangerous grittiness of life. Like Chekhov, he did not loll about on the narrow top of an ivory tower.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 1, 1996
"The United States of Poetry," a five-part, 2 1/2 -hour series debuting on MPT at 11 tonight, is not so much about verse as about diversity, about finding the artistic muse everywhere, about how all-encompassing the word "talent" is.Thus, this scattershot anthology of American poets embraces everyone from a freckle-faced Idaho third-grader to a woman of 70-plus years living in Arkansas with her husband and 50 cats. It features the work of a homeless man living in L.A. and a former president of the United States.
NEWS
By Merrill Leffler | December 4, 1994
Credit David Lehman for piloting what has become, since 1988, an annual fest of American poetry, though neither you nor the poets included should be misled by this being the best there is. Each year, a prominent poet, with Mr. Lehman's assistance, navigates the rocky waters of literary magazines (not books) to choose, from thousands of poems, 75 for enshrinement. In addition, there are some 40 to 50 pages of biographies and comments by poets on their poems (pages that could have been better put to printing poems)
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | June 15, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Mona Van Duyn, a writer admired for her intelligence and wit, was named poet laureate of the United States yesterday.Her breadth can be seen in her latest collection, "Letters From a Father and Other Poems" (Atheneum), which presents images both of shared joy and the last decline of her aged parents, and in an observation of hers that might have sprung from Ogden Nash:The world's perverse,but it could have been worse.In announcing Ms. Van Duyn's selection, the librarian of Congress, James H. Billington, said, "I look forward to welcoming Ms. Van Duyn to the library, and I am particularly pleased to have a distinguished poet of such wide range joining us to promote public awareness of poetry and literature."
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