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By Masaaki Niwa, Evening Yomiuri Shimbun Fresh and Balanced Expression | December 20, 1994
Here are excerpts from some of the reviews of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's recent tour of Japan.Skillful Use of Forte and Pianissimo SoundsAmerica's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra made its first appearance in Japan on the evening of November 11 at Suntory Hall under the baton of its musical director, David Zinman. Its program consisted of Copland's ''El Salon Mexico,'' Elgar's E-minor ''Cello Concerto,'' and Rachmaninoff's E-minor, ''Second Symphony.''Although this orchestra . . . is not as well known in Japan as the New York Philharmonic or Boston Symphony, it presented a performance which can be considered the best of all the overseas orchestras that have visited Japan this year.
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NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - In the empty concert hall of the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts - its sea of turquoise seats set against sand-colored walls practically shouts "Florida" - four musicians rehearse Mozart's elegant E-flat major Quartet for piano and strings. Cellist Troy Stuart furrows his brow, saying, "Something's not right." Violinist Tai Murray agrees and asks the pianist to come in "more joyfully." She kicks up her fur boot-covered feet in a little dance to demonstrate the mood she's after.
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FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | July 18, 1993
A little more than a year ago the annual conference of the American Symphony Orchestra League issued a report saying American orchestras were in big trouble. Their graying audiences were dying off, their funding sources were drying up, and they were running deficits that pushed more and more orchestras near -- and in some cases into -- bankruptcy.Last month at its annual meeting, the ASOL issued a 200-page report, called "Americanizing the American Orchestra," that seeks to address the problem.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | December 16, 2001
Now that the jet lag is wearing off, it's time to start evaluating the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 19-day, 12-city, $2-million-plus European tour. Was it worth it? Absolutely. Could it have been even better? Sure. But what matters most is that the BSO successfully re-established contact with a European public that had not encountered the orchestra since 1987. And, as BSO president John Gidwitz pointed out on the eve of the trip, great orchestras tour; it's one of the things they have to do to claim and maintain their eminence.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 11, 1996
Ivan Fischer would seem to be a near-perfect candidate to succeed David Zinman as the Baltimore Symphony's music director.Fischer, who will lead the orchestra's subscription concerts this week, has guest-conducted here several times with success. The players appear to like and respect him.His abilities as an orchestra builder and trainer have been dramatically demonstrated by the way he has nurtured the Budapest Festival Orchestra to international status in the 13 years since he founded it in 1983.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 2, 1999
The moment David Zinman leaves Baltimore, it seems, he gets famous -- profiting from his years here while making us look bad for losing him.Just kidding, folks, just kidding.Actually, anything that's good for David Zinman reflects favorably on the Baltimore Symphony and vice versa.Nevertheless, it seems that there's been more mention made of Zinman in the international music press in the last few days than in all 13 years of his tenure as our orchestra's music director.In the Arts and Leisure section of Sunday's New York Times, for example, music critic Greg Sandow, in his "Looking for Listeners Who Can Love New Music," mentions Zinman's "enthusiastically played" performances of "a lot of contemporary work" and calls the BSO, along with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the San Francisco Symphony, the "three major American orchestras that play the most new music."
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 29, 1996
This has been a dispiriting year for classical music lovers.In September, David Zinman announced he will not renew his contract as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra after next season, thus ending an enormously successful 13-year partnership and leaving the orchestra's future in doubt.The national music scene has been equally grim: Several important orchestras -- Philadelphia, San Francisco and Atlanta -- have gone on strike; and because of sharply falling sales, death knells have been sounding for the classical record industry.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | December 16, 2001
Now that the jet lag is wearing off, it's time to start evaluating the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's 19-day, 12-city, $2-million-plus European tour. Was it worth it? Absolutely. Could it have been even better? Sure. But what matters most is that the BSO successfully re-established contact with a European public that had not encountered the orchestra since 1987. And, as BSO president John Gidwitz pointed out on the eve of the trip, great orchestras tour; it's one of the things they have to do to claim and maintain their eminence.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 17, 1992
BETTY SCOTT is president of an organization that she'd like to see go out of business as quickly as possible.It's the Women Composers Orchestra, which gives the first of two concerts this year tomorrow evening in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory. The orchestra -- a chamber-orchestra sized group whose membership ranges from 20 to 50 players -- is made up equally of men and women, but it performs only music by women composers.Tomorrow's concert features composers who range from the relatively well-known and established (Ruth Schonthal and Tina Davidson)
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 17, 1992
Betty Scott is president of an organization that she'd like to see go out of business as quickly as possible.It's the Women Composers Orchestra, which gives the first of two concerts this year tomorrow evening in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory. The orchestra -- a chamber-orchestra sized group whose membership ranges from 20 to 50 players -- is made up equally of men and women, but it performs only music by women composers.Tomorrow's concert features composers who range from the relatively well-known and established (Ruth Schonthal and Tina Davidson)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | July 11, 1999
The great game of musical chairs -- or, more accurately, of orchestral podiums -- has begun again. And everyone's guessing about who's going where.The classical music world buzzes with expectations every 10 or 12 years when the music directorships of one or more of the world's major orchestras becomes available. The last round in this sweepstakes occurred in the 1980s when the orchestras of New York, Philadelphia, Cleveland, Berlin and Chicago were up for grabs. This time the stakes seem even higher, partly because several job searches are taking place simultaneously and because the number of qualified contenders is smaller than ever.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 2, 1999
The moment David Zinman leaves Baltimore, it seems, he gets famous -- profiting from his years here while making us look bad for losing him.Just kidding, folks, just kidding.Actually, anything that's good for David Zinman reflects favorably on the Baltimore Symphony and vice versa.Nevertheless, it seems that there's been more mention made of Zinman in the international music press in the last few days than in all 13 years of his tenure as our orchestra's music director.In the Arts and Leisure section of Sunday's New York Times, for example, music critic Greg Sandow, in his "Looking for Listeners Who Can Love New Music," mentions Zinman's "enthusiastically played" performances of "a lot of contemporary work" and calls the BSO, along with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the San Francisco Symphony, the "three major American orchestras that play the most new music."
NEWS
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | December 29, 1996
This has been a dispiriting year for classical music lovers.In September, David Zinman announced he will not renew his contract as music director of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra after next season, thus ending an enormously successful 13-year partnership and leaving the orchestra's future in doubt.The national music scene has been equally grim: Several important orchestras -- Philadelphia, San Francisco and Atlanta -- have gone on strike; and because of sharply falling sales, death knells have been sounding for the classical record industry.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 11, 1996
Ivan Fischer would seem to be a near-perfect candidate to succeed David Zinman as the Baltimore Symphony's music director.Fischer, who will lead the orchestra's subscription concerts this week, has guest-conducted here several times with success. The players appear to like and respect him.His abilities as an orchestra builder and trainer have been dramatically demonstrated by the way he has nurtured the Budapest Festival Orchestra to international status in the 13 years since he founded it in 1983.
NEWS
By Masaaki Niwa, Evening Yomiuri Shimbun Fresh and Balanced Expression | December 20, 1994
Here are excerpts from some of the reviews of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra's recent tour of Japan.Skillful Use of Forte and Pianissimo SoundsAmerica's Baltimore Symphony Orchestra made its first appearance in Japan on the evening of November 11 at Suntory Hall under the baton of its musical director, David Zinman. Its program consisted of Copland's ''El Salon Mexico,'' Elgar's E-minor ''Cello Concerto,'' and Rachmaninoff's E-minor, ''Second Symphony.''Although this orchestra . . . is not as well known in Japan as the New York Philharmonic or Boston Symphony, it presented a performance which can be considered the best of all the overseas orchestras that have visited Japan this year.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 24, 1994
The Baltimore Symphony's "Dance Mix" concert earlier this month did not achieve the BSO's salvation, but it took a step toward addressing some fundamental issues faced by orchestras.In the "Dance Mix" program, music director David Zinman -- purportedly in the hope of attracting an audience mostly under 30 -- presented 12 short, rhythmically driven pieces rooted in the pop music idioms of baby-boom and post-baby-boom America.Skeptics suspected the "Dance Mix" program, performed only once in public, was an excuse to prepare the orchestra for sessions in the succeeding two days to record the pieces for the Argo label.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 24, 1994
The Baltimore Symphony's "Dance Mix" concert earlier this month did not achieve the BSO's salvation, but it took a step toward addressing some fundamental issues faced by orchestras.In the "Dance Mix" program, music director David Zinman -- purportedly in the hope of attracting an audience mostly under 30 -- presented 12 short, rhythmically driven pieces rooted in the pop music idioms of baby-boom and post-baby-boom America.Skeptics suspected the "Dance Mix" program, performed only once in public, was an excuse to prepare the orchestra for sessions in the succeeding two days to record the pieces for the Argo label.
NEWS
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,tim.smith@baltsun.com | December 7, 2008
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. - In the empty concert hall of the Times-Union Center for the Performing Arts - its sea of turquoise seats set against sand-colored walls practically shouts "Florida" - four musicians rehearse Mozart's elegant E-flat major Quartet for piano and strings. Cellist Troy Stuart furrows his brow, saying, "Something's not right." Violinist Tai Murray agrees and asks the pianist to come in "more joyfully." She kicks up her fur boot-covered feet in a little dance to demonstrate the mood she's after.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | July 18, 1993
A little more than a year ago the annual conference of the American Symphony Orchestra League issued a report saying American orchestras were in big trouble. Their graying audiences were dying off, their funding sources were drying up, and they were running deficits that pushed more and more orchestras near -- and in some cases into -- bankruptcy.Last month at its annual meeting, the ASOL issued a 200-page report, called "Americanizing the American Orchestra," that seeks to address the problem.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | January 17, 1992
BETTY SCOTT is president of an organization that she'd like to see go out of business as quickly as possible.It's the Women Composers Orchestra, which gives the first of two concerts this year tomorrow evening in Friedberg Hall at the Peabody Conservatory. The orchestra -- a chamber-orchestra sized group whose membership ranges from 20 to 50 players -- is made up equally of men and women, but it performs only music by women composers.Tomorrow's concert features composers who range from the relatively well-known and established (Ruth Schonthal and Tina Davidson)
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