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By Chris Kaltenbach | July 22, 1997
One of the greatest films of all time gets an airing tonight and tomorrow night in two parts on USA.Francis Ford Coppola was pretty much an unknown when he was chosen to direct "The Godfather" (9 p.m.-11 p.m. both nights). So were stars Al Pacino, James Caan and Robert Duvall. And Marlon Brando, chosen to play Don Corleone, was a has-been. All that changed when the film became not only a critical favorite, but a box-office smash.Coppola's film presents the saga as not just the story of an American family, but of an American myth: Don Corleone as a Lear surrounded by men with guns.
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By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 12, 2006
YOUNG MR. LINCOLN / / The Criterion Collection / $39.95 John Ford understood that democracy isn't just a form of government. It's a feeling that mingles liberty, possibility and fellowship -- and it can't be faked, no matter how hard politicians try. Ford's 1939 masterpiece Young Mr. Lincoln (due out Tuesday) portrays the Republican statesman as a small-D democrat to his bones. It's neither a biography nor a tract. It's a loving riff on Lincoln as the embodiment of the best in American character.
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By A. ZOLAND LEISHEAR | May 8, 1991
On the outside of my window is an ash-gray circle. It is all that remains of a wasp's nest that was built during the summer. They began building it in early June. I say ''they'' because I can't believe it was the work of a single wasp and yet I only saw one at any given moment.I watched him closely. It became an obsession. When I first noticed the nest, it was the size of a walnut. By the time I realized the window was down from the top and permitted entry into the room, it had spread to the window frame.
NEWS
By George Baca | September 19, 2005
The tragedy sweeping through the Gulf Coast in Hurricane Katrina's wake reveals how deeply racism and class inequality divide this country. Some media critics, by focusing solely on President Bush's inadequacies, have tended to obscure the key issues at play. His administration surely failed to respond appropriately or efficiently to the disaster, magnifying its destructive power. But the disintegration of New Orleans has a much longer history, embodied in a make-the-federal-government-weaker philosophy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | February 15, 2004
The Working Poor: Invisible in America, by David K. Shipler. Knopf. 336 pages. $25. More than 30 million working Americans live in poverty, and, as the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Shipler writes, their plight "test[s] the American doctrine that hard work cures poverty." In this moving and meticulous study, Shipler interviews not only the working poor but also their employers, social workers, and job trainers. He tries to "challenge and undermine assumptions at both ends of the spectrum," from the "American myth ... that any individual from the humblest origins can climb to well-being" to the "American anti-myth, which holds the society largely responsible for the individual's poverty."
NEWS
By George Baca | September 19, 2005
The tragedy sweeping through the Gulf Coast in Hurricane Katrina's wake reveals how deeply racism and class inequality divide this country. Some media critics, by focusing solely on President Bush's inadequacies, have tended to obscure the key issues at play. His administration surely failed to respond appropriately or efficiently to the disaster, magnifying its destructive power. But the disintegration of New Orleans has a much longer history, embodied in a make-the-federal-government-weaker philosophy.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1997
Behind the wheel of his Ford Taurus, Julian Lapides zips through Baltimore like a bus driver 30 minutes behind schedule.Two years have passed since he left a seven-term career in the Maryland State Senate to run unsuccessfully for city comptroller, and he seems busier than ever. He drives like a man trying to make up for lost time."I've divided my life into thirds," he says. "At 31, I finished college, law school and the service and was elected to the House of Delegates in '62. Then I ran for the Senate seat in '66 and served for seven consecutive terms -- for a total of 32 years in the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1997
Thursday is the 100th birthday of the greatest 20th century American writer of prose fiction.William Faulkner won't be here to join the celebration, of course. He made damn sure that wouldn't happen. If the drinking didn't get him then another fall from a horse would have, which he considered no reason to stop drinking or riding. He pushed his physical constitution and his luck no less than the limits of narrative form. In each case he rode to the precipice, and, much to the gain of American literature if not his health, jumped.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 11, 1994
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tony Kushner is dressed in a conservative dark suit and bow tie, with a small gold hoop earring in his left ear lobe. A mass of black curls crowns his bespectacled face.His appearance gives off mixed signals -- serious (the glasses and suit), jovial (the curls and bow tie) and forthright (the earring).It's a look that serves as an apt metaphor for the seemingly contradictory juxtapositions in his hit Broadway play, "Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes."
NEWS
By Frank Wu | November 1, 1995
CRITICISM OF THE model minority myth of Asian-Americans has become so familiar that it is taken for granted by many of us.But every generation should be reminded of the lies of the myth and their use for political purposes.Anyone who studies Asian-Americans knows about the model minority myth.Since the arrival of Asian immigrants in the 19th century, and most notably since the 1960s, this superminority image has suggested that Asian-Americans achieve economic success and gain societal acceptance through conservative values and hard work.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to the Sun | February 15, 2004
The Working Poor: Invisible in America, by David K. Shipler. Knopf. 336 pages. $25. More than 30 million working Americans live in poverty, and, as the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Shipler writes, their plight "test[s] the American doctrine that hard work cures poverty." In this moving and meticulous study, Shipler interviews not only the working poor but also their employers, social workers, and job trainers. He tries to "challenge and undermine assumptions at both ends of the spectrum," from the "American myth ... that any individual from the humblest origins can climb to well-being" to the "American anti-myth, which holds the society largely responsible for the individual's poverty."
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | October 26, 1997
Behind the wheel of his Ford Taurus, Julian Lapides zips through Baltimore like a bus driver 30 minutes behind schedule.Two years have passed since he left a seven-term career in the Maryland State Senate to run unsuccessfully for city comptroller, and he seems busier than ever. He drives like a man trying to make up for lost time."I've divided my life into thirds," he says. "At 31, I finished college, law school and the service and was elected to the House of Delegates in '62. Then I ran for the Senate seat in '66 and served for seven consecutive terms -- for a total of 32 years in the General Assembly.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1997
Thursday is the 100th birthday of the greatest 20th century American writer of prose fiction.William Faulkner won't be here to join the celebration, of course. He made damn sure that wouldn't happen. If the drinking didn't get him then another fall from a horse would have, which he considered no reason to stop drinking or riding. He pushed his physical constitution and his luck no less than the limits of narrative form. In each case he rode to the precipice, and, much to the gain of American literature if not his health, jumped.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | July 22, 1997
One of the greatest films of all time gets an airing tonight and tomorrow night in two parts on USA.Francis Ford Coppola was pretty much an unknown when he was chosen to direct "The Godfather" (9 p.m.-11 p.m. both nights). So were stars Al Pacino, James Caan and Robert Duvall. And Marlon Brando, chosen to play Don Corleone, was a has-been. All that changed when the film became not only a critical favorite, but a box-office smash.Coppola's film presents the saga as not just the story of an American family, but of an American myth: Don Corleone as a Lear surrounded by men with guns.
NEWS
By Frank Wu | November 1, 1995
CRITICISM OF THE model minority myth of Asian-Americans has become so familiar that it is taken for granted by many of us.But every generation should be reminded of the lies of the myth and their use for political purposes.Anyone who studies Asian-Americans knows about the model minority myth.Since the arrival of Asian immigrants in the 19th century, and most notably since the 1960s, this superminority image has suggested that Asian-Americans achieve economic success and gain societal acceptance through conservative values and hard work.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | March 11, 1994
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Tony Kushner is dressed in a conservative dark suit and bow tie, with a small gold hoop earring in his left ear lobe. A mass of black curls crowns his bespectacled face.His appearance gives off mixed signals -- serious (the glasses and suit), jovial (the curls and bow tie) and forthright (the earring).It's a look that serves as an apt metaphor for the seemingly contradictory juxtapositions in his hit Broadway play, "Angels in America: A Gay Fantasia on National Themes."
NEWS
By MICHAEL SRAGOW | February 12, 2006
YOUNG MR. LINCOLN / / The Criterion Collection / $39.95 John Ford understood that democracy isn't just a form of government. It's a feeling that mingles liberty, possibility and fellowship -- and it can't be faked, no matter how hard politicians try. Ford's 1939 masterpiece Young Mr. Lincoln (due out Tuesday) portrays the Republican statesman as a small-D democrat to his bones. It's neither a biography nor a tract. It's a loving riff on Lincoln as the embodiment of the best in American character.
NEWS
By Arthur Hirsch and Arthur Hirsch,SUN STAFF | November 16, 1997
In January 1936, William Faulkner had just completed his latest novel and begun his latest drinking binge. He handed the new manuscript to a friend and said, "I want you to read this. ... I think it's the best novel yet written by an American."It sounded like the bourbon talking, but Faulkner was right. Still is. The fellow whom Faulkner had met while working for Warner Bros. held in his hands the world's only copy of what would become - after some revision -"Absalom, Absalom!", the publication of which should have by now settled the question of what is The Great American Novel.
NEWS
By A. ZOLAND LEISHEAR | May 8, 1991
On the outside of my window is an ash-gray circle. It is all that remains of a wasp's nest that was built during the summer. They began building it in early June. I say ''they'' because I can't believe it was the work of a single wasp and yet I only saw one at any given moment.I watched him closely. It became an obsession. When I first noticed the nest, it was the size of a walnut. By the time I realized the window was down from the top and permitted entry into the room, it had spread to the window frame.
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