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ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | February 13, 2000
It's been almost one year to the day since Chris Smith's "American Movie" took grand jury honors for best documentary at the Sundance Film Festival. You might expect that kind of exposure would catapult the film's principals into stardom -- in Smith's case, into the kind of fame and fortune every young director dreams of; in the case of Mark Borchardt, the struggling filmmaker Smith chronicles in "American Movie," into a production deal for the movie he so desperately wants to make. So did 1999 change everything for the two young men?
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2013
A new manufacturing documentary that will get an advance screening in Baltimore this week suggests that average Americans aren't powerless to stop job loss in the sector. It's a simple and surprisingly old message that has seen a resurgence since the rough recession: Buy American. The independent filmmakers behind "American Made Movie" - being released Aug. 30 - say they're not protectionists and are happy to hear about foreign-owned manufacturers with factories in this country.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 4, 2000
Midway through "American Movie," a filmmaker named Mark Borchardt and his girlfriend are watching the 1997 Oscars telecast. While Billy Crystal gives asinine lip-service to the "year of the independents," when "unusual films, risky plots, great direction" were the order of the day, Borchardt looks at the television uncomprehendingly, as if Crystal were speaking Urdu. It's difficult to imagine someone more independent and less a part of Crystal's universe than Mark Borchardt, the star and tenacious moral center of Chris Smith's giddily inspiring documentary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
This July 4th weekend the AFI Silver theater in Silver Spring hosts the brilliantly restored editions of "The Godfather" and "The Godfather Part II." In this dual masterpiece, director Francis Ford Coppola turns patriotic cliches on their head. But these movies are an apt cause for celebration on Independence Day. They epitomize American artists' freedom and vitality. The first speech we hear is an aggrieved Italian-American father, saying, "I believe in America. America has made my fortune."
NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | February 3, 1993
Comcast Cable viewers can now tune into more classic movies, science fiction, education programs and cartoons with the addition of four channels.Harford County's largest cable provider added Monday the American Movie Classics, the Sci-Fi Channel, the Learning Channel and the Cartoon Network, shown on channels 51 through 54.The entire package, dubbed People's Choice, is being offered free on a 25-day trial to all 39,732 Harford Comcast customers. The package will add $2.95 a month to the preferred basic fee after Feb. 25.American Movie Classics is the only cable channel featuring 24 hours of classic movies -- uncut, black-and-white and commercial-free.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 14, 2007
Starting Out in the Evening is a rapturous, ruefully funny flight of sympathetic imagination. Featuring the first movie role for Frank Langella that ranks with his best stage parts, it's a rare kind of American movie. It gets us arguing about all the characters - and enjoying the debates every step of the way, because we're so intimately involved with their dreams and passions. This movie tells the story of a young woman still thrashing out the shape of her life, who compels an aged man to look back without anger on his own experiences, including his complicated marriage and his fatherhood to a now 40-year-old daughter.
FEATURES
By COX NEWS SERVICE | October 1, 1995
It's Buster Keaton's year, and it's about time.There's a good, new biography ("Buster Keaton: Cut to the Chase," by Marion Meade), Keaton's classic films have been released by Kino Video, and a sterling lineup will be shown this week during American Movie Classic's Third Annual Film Preservation Festival.This year's festival focuses on comedy, with 24-hour marathons devoted to Laurel and Hardy, Bob Hope, Jerry Lewis and to Keaton (on Wednesday), which also happens to be his 100th birthday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 27, 2001
When you think of films about Pearl Harbor, the movie version of James Jones' novel "From Here to Eternity" may not come immediately to mind. After all, the Japanese surprise attack takes place only near the end of the film. And "From Here to Eternity" is better known as a serious slice of American life: an unblinking look at the pre-war U.S. Army. Moreover, though it was a huge hit and Academy Award-winner, it dates from 1953, when blockbusters could be adult movies. This weekend's new entry, "Pearl Harbor," is instead the unholy progeny of "Saving Private Ryan" and "Titanic."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 2000
Everclear Songs from an American Movie, Vol. One: Learning How to Smile (Capitol 7243 4 97061) Autobiography can be treacherous turf for rock and roll. It's reasonable enough to use the personal to illustrate the universal, as songwriters from John Lennon to Alanis Morissette have shown. Delve too deeply into private problems, however, and that "Song of Myself" runs the risk of being incomprehensible to anyone but the singer and his (or her) shrink. Given the length and ambition of its title, it's reasonable to worry that Everclear's "Songs from an American Movie, Vol. One: Learning How to Smile" will fall into the latter category.
NEWS
By BEN WATTENBERG | October 13, 1995
ASPEN, Colo. -- President Clinton is concerned about American isolationism. In his realm, that's appropriate. But in a more important arena -- global ''soft power'' -- there has been a recent positive quantum jump in American internationalism. After talking here with entertainment entrepreneurs at an Aspen Institute conference, one can look beyond the mountains and see the possibility of one more American Century.Such musings stem from the two new mega-mergers of corporate communications giants: Disney with Capital Cities/ABC and Time Warner with Turner Broadcasting.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 14, 2007
Starting Out in the Evening is a rapturous, ruefully funny flight of sympathetic imagination. Featuring the first movie role for Frank Langella that ranks with his best stage parts, it's a rare kind of American movie. It gets us arguing about all the characters - and enjoying the debates every step of the way, because we're so intimately involved with their dreams and passions. This movie tells the story of a young woman still thrashing out the shape of her life, who compels an aged man to look back without anger on his own experiences, including his complicated marriage and his fatherhood to a now 40-year-old daughter.
FEATURES
By Liz Smith and Liz Smith,Tribune Media Services | May 21, 2007
A BON commencement bonne fin!" A good beginning makes a good end, say the French. (They are saying a lot these days with their controversial new president, but we could apply this to the Cannes Film Festival as well.) Would you walk a mile down the Croisette to see a movie by the controversial Coen Brothers, or Hollywood's pet Quentin Tarantino, or the fabled Gus Van Sant, or the relatively unpublicized Hong Kong maestro Wong Kar-Wai? If so, maybe you belong in Cannes at the most famous of all movie festivals - this one being the French Riviera's glamorous 60th celebration.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 2, 2004
For a little bug that becomes a national obsession every 17 years, the cicada hasn't left much of an impression on America's movie screens. That's assuredly strange, given Hollywood's predilection for jumping on any trend that comes within earshot and milking it for every dollar possible. There have been movies about the Lambada, Halley's Comet, Valley Girls, Jim Jones, roller boogie, ninja turtles, The Gong Show and Martha Stewart. But those bizarre insects that show up seriously en masse every 17 years; that cause the squeamish to squeam even more than usual at the thought of squishing a handful of them with every step; that force educated people to cower in fear as though the sky were falling, moving spring cookouts indoors and warning their children to stay inside ... About those bugs, the movies have said practically nothing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 27, 2001
When you think of films about Pearl Harbor, the movie version of James Jones' novel "From Here to Eternity" may not come immediately to mind. After all, the Japanese surprise attack takes place only near the end of the film. And "From Here to Eternity" is better known as a serious slice of American life: an unblinking look at the pre-war U.S. Army. Moreover, though it was a huge hit and Academy Award-winner, it dates from 1953, when blockbusters could be adult movies. This weekend's new entry, "Pearl Harbor," is instead the unholy progeny of "Saving Private Ryan" and "Titanic."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | July 27, 2000
Everclear Songs from an American Movie, Vol. One: Learning How to Smile (Capitol 7243 4 97061) Autobiography can be treacherous turf for rock and roll. It's reasonable enough to use the personal to illustrate the universal, as songwriters from John Lennon to Alanis Morissette have shown. Delve too deeply into private problems, however, and that "Song of Myself" runs the risk of being incomprehensible to anyone but the singer and his (or her) shrink. Given the length and ambition of its title, it's reasonable to worry that Everclear's "Songs from an American Movie, Vol. One: Learning How to Smile" will fall into the latter category.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | February 13, 2000
It's been almost one year to the day since Chris Smith's "American Movie" took grand jury honors for best documentary at the Sundance Film Festival. You might expect that kind of exposure would catapult the film's principals into stardom -- in Smith's case, into the kind of fame and fortune every young director dreams of; in the case of Mark Borchardt, the struggling filmmaker Smith chronicles in "American Movie," into a production deal for the movie he so desperately wants to make. So did 1999 change everything for the two young men?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Movie Critic | May 2, 2004
For a little bug that becomes a national obsession every 17 years, the cicada hasn't left much of an impression on America's movie screens. That's assuredly strange, given Hollywood's predilection for jumping on any trend that comes within earshot and milking it for every dollar possible. There have been movies about the Lambada, Halley's Comet, Valley Girls, Jim Jones, roller boogie, ninja turtles, The Gong Show and Martha Stewart. But those bizarre insects that show up seriously en masse every 17 years; that cause the squeamish to squeam even more than usual at the thought of squishing a handful of them with every step; that force educated people to cower in fear as though the sky were falling, moving spring cookouts indoors and warning their children to stay inside ... About those bugs, the movies have said practically nothing.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 19, 1992
No movie I've seen in the past six months has lit me up as much as "Boomerang."It's such a rare feeling, too: the buzz, the increasing excitement, the sense of stepping through the membrane of the screen until you are completely inside the movie, wandering among the characters, desperate to know what happens next. And you know that when it's over, you'll want to hector people about it, try to get them to feel some of the excitement that you felt as it unspooled before your fascinated eyes.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 4, 2000
Midway through "American Movie," a filmmaker named Mark Borchardt and his girlfriend are watching the 1997 Oscars telecast. While Billy Crystal gives asinine lip-service to the "year of the independents," when "unusual films, risky plots, great direction" were the order of the day, Borchardt looks at the television uncomprehendingly, as if Crystal were speaking Urdu. It's difficult to imagine someone more independent and less a part of Crystal's universe than Mark Borchardt, the star and tenacious moral center of Chris Smith's giddily inspiring documentary.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach and Ann Hornaday and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 21, 1998
Now that the dust has settled, the American Film Institute's canonization of the "greatest 100 American movies of all time" has inspired a few random observations:United Artists - This studio was responsible for the most titles on the list - 18. Formed in 1919 by Charlie Chaplin, D.W. Griffith, Mary Pickford and Douglas Fairbanks Sr. as a refuge from the predations of exploitative studios, UA stayed true to its mission throughout economic busts and booms...
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