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By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
I hate needles, and I've always deferred to doctors and scientists when it comes to questions of medical importance. Suffice it to say I've been ambivalent since I was a teen about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's ban on gay men donating blood. Should I be indignant? Or would that be presumptive? Should I be happy with my excuse not to get pricked? Or should I feel bad about not giving? After devouring the history of the gay rights movement in college and later spending a year working closely with HIV-positive adults and children in an AIDS-ravaged rural town in southern Africa -- partly on efforts to prevent mother-to-child transmission -- I'd come no closer to having an answer.
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NEWS
March 3, 2014
I'd like to address some of Michelle Minton's comments directed at the bills aimed to ban energy drinks to minors ( "No one cards at Starbucks," Feb. 27). First of all, to say that these bills are "knee jerk legislation based on anecdotal evidence and sensational news headlines" is simply untrue. These drinks not only contain large amounts of caffeine but also contain other ingredients with stimulant properties. Also, let's clarify that the caffeine listed on cans of energy drinks is a food additive.
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NEWS
May 16, 2004
Twenty-six percent of U.S. children ages 2-12 are overweight. -- American Medical Association
NEWS
July 12, 2013
Nearly 10 years ago, I reacted with horror and disdain as President George W. Bush gleefully took credit for extra-judicial killings and indefinite detention of suspected terrorists. I thought: "How could a president throw away the basic principle of trial by jury and shred our Constitution?" I agreed with those who saw the detention center at Guantanamo Bay as a terrible stain on our national values and called for its closure. As a supporter of the Green Party, I did not vote for President Obama in 2008.
NEWS
By Mary Beth Regan and Mary Beth Regan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 21, 2005
For the past five years, top-ranking Democratic Party official Bradley Marshall has squeezed time into his jammed schedule to visit Baltimore - for his annual physical. But getting an appointment isn't as easy as it used to be. Marshall is one of more than a thousand people who participate each year in Johns Hopkins Medicine's Executive Health Program, a project created a decade ago by Dr. George H. Sack Jr. in part to change the way doctors administer annual physical exams. "It used to be your doctor looked down your throat, checked your blood pressure and sent you on your way," says Marshall, 50, the chief financial officer for the Democratic National Committee in Washington.
FEATURES
November 12, 2007
Nov. 12 1987 The American Medical Association issued a policy saying it was unethical for a doctor to refuse to treat someone solely because that person had AIDS or was HIV-positive.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 15, 1991
The good news is that Queen Elizabeth II will watch th Baltimore Orioles at play. The bad news is that George Bush is assigned to explain the game to her.This is late in the game but the American Medical Association, which fought national health insurance to death, just caught on that it would mean more doctor work at good pay.
NEWS
June 26, 1991
Four internal medicine specialists of the Worthington Medical Group have joined the medical staff at Carroll County General Hospital:* Dr. John D. Milto received his medical degree from the Medical School of Autonomous University of Guadalajara in Mexico. He completed his internship in internal medicine and his residencies in medicine at South Baltimore General Hospital in Maryland. A member of the American Medical Association and the Baltimore County Med-Chi Faculty, he has also served as an instructor with the American Heart Association.
NEWS
April 2, 2001
Maryland ranked third in the nation in 1997 in the number of doctors per 100,000 people. The national rate is 245. State...Percent...Rank Massachusetts...402...1 New York...375...2 Maryland...362...3 Connecticut...344...4 Rhode Island...324...5 Vermont...288...6 New Jersey...287...7 Pennsylvania...282...8 Illinois...253...9 Hawaii...252...10 Virginia...233...16 Delaware...230...18 Source: American Medical Association
NEWS
August 9, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- James S. Wright, a psychiatrist with 30 years experience and a specialist in the care of adolescents and TC older adults, has joined the staff of Carroll County General Hospital.He is a graduate of University College Dublin Medical School in Ireland, with training at Altrincham General Hospital in Manchester, England, and Crichton Royal Hospital in Scotland.Dr. Wright served residencies in neurology in Belfast, Ireland; family practice at the University of Maryland in Baltimore; and training and fellowship at Seton Institute in Baltimore.
NEWS
June 23, 2013
Good luck to Jessica Weiderholdt in keeping her 70 pounds off ("Teacher adopts new diet, lifestyle," June 20). However, the article looks like an advertisement for Beachbody exercise and Shakeology drinks. The American Medical Association has agreed that obesity is a disease. I have told patients about it for 20 years. I rode my bike to work for four years before deciding that running there was better. I'm proud of so many patients who have discovered cheaper exercise regimes and fruit and vegetables.
FEATURES
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2013
I hate needles, and I've always deferred to doctors and scientists when it comes to questions of medical importance. Suffice it to say I've been ambivalent since I was a teen about the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's ban on gay men donating blood. Should I be indignant? Or would that be presumptive? Should I be happy with my excuse not to get pricked? Or should I feel bad about not giving? After devouring the history of the gay rights movement in college and later spending a year working closely with HIV-positive adults and children in an AIDS-ravaged rural town in southern Africa -- partly on efforts to prevent mother-to-child transmission -- I'd come no closer to having an answer.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2011
A federal jury convicted a retired Eastern Shore cardiologist Tuesday of health care fraud and related charges for placing unnecessary coronary stents in the arteries of dozens of patients, then billing private and public insurers hundreds of thousands of dollars for the procedures. John R. McLean, 59, who surrendered his medical privileges at Peninsula Regional Medical Center in 2007 after a hospital investigation, faces a maximum of 35 years in prison at his sentencing, scheduled for Nov. 10, according to the Maryland U.S. attorney's office.
NEWS
June 30, 2009
Delay execution regulations While we failed this year to repeal Maryland's violation of the Constitution's prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment, we will be back. The Baltimore Sun's admirable stance over the years against the death penalty has always been appreciated. Yet I am baffled by the editorial "A dishonest delay" (June 26). The writer seems confused: "legislators shouldn't drag out approvals of execution regulations to maintain a moratorium; the governor should commute death sentences instead."
NEWS
March 4, 2009
Liability limits save access to care Proven medical liability reforms, including a cap on noneconomic damages, are working to keep Maryland physicians caring for patients while still allowing injured patients access to the court system. In fact, as the column from the president of the Maryland trial lawyers association suggests, about the only people complaining are trial lawyers ("Time to treat malpractice victims fairly," Feb. 27). In states without such reforms, many cases result in runaway jury awards for noneconomic damages.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and David Kohn and Liz F. Kay and David Kohn,Sun Reporters | July 11, 2008
The nation's chief medical association apologized yesterday for decades of past discrimination against African-American physicians, when it effectively denied membership to many black doctors - which many believe has left a legacy of separate and unequal care. The American Medical Association released an article and commentary acknowledging discriminatory practices that, although ended decades ago, still affect medical care. For example, until 1968 it limited membership to doctors who were also members of a state-level affiliate - many of which were segregated.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | May 3, 2008
Dr. Harry S. Gimbel, an old-fashioned general practitioner who made house calls long after others had stopped, died Sunday in his sleep at his Pikesville home. He was 96. Dr Gimbel practiced for about 50 years, and patients who came to his Catonsville office were seen without appointments. His two sons are orthopedic surgeons who live in Phoenix, Ariz. Dr. Gimbel worked seven days a week and would leave work late in the afternoon, rest for half an hour, eat dinner at 5 p.m., and then return to his office, where he saw patients until 9 p.m. "He did this three or four nights a week," recalled one of his sons, Dr. Neal I. Gimbel.
FEATURES
November 12, 2007
Nov. 12 1987 The American Medical Association issued a policy saying it was unethical for a doctor to refuse to treat someone solely because that person had AIDS or was HIV-positive.
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